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Calamity Jane: The Masquerade of Masculinity

by Audry Grant

Women of the western frontier were usually given two choices in life: being someone’s loving housewife, or turning tricks at the local whorehouse. The “cowboy’s female counterpartâ??who can rope and wrangle, who understands land and stock and confronts the elements on a daily basisâ??is somehow missing from folklore.” One woman decided that she needed more from life than existing only for the pleasure of men. She refused the silk stockings and donned beaver-skin slacks. She chose freedom over marriageâ??but the transition into the man’s world was not as simple for her as changing clothes.
She had to become a â??man’ to successfully transition into their world. And thus her persona was born. A woman tougher than men, who could drink and shoot with the bestâ??Calamity Janeâ??a psychological manifestation of an independent woman driven by the needs of a woman who refused to be gendered in a world of men.

Born Martha Jane Canary (1852-1903) in Princeton Missouri, Calamity Jane was the oldest child in a family of five children, which may have propelled her drive for attention and her natural instincts for independence. Even as a child, she “always had a fondness for adventureâ?¦and for horses .” Most of her childhood was spent in the company of men, and in just a few short years she became a fearless rider and an amazing marksman.

CALAMITY JANE: THE MASQUERADE OF MASCULINITY is a literary journey of the woman behind the hell-raising persona. She was a woman who couldn’t just exist among the men, either. She had to engender their trust and respect by being better than they could ever be. From this desire, she concocted the most intriguing and frightening stories she could imagine to gain their admiration. She fancied herself a woman who could take on a legion of murderers, or get herself thrown out of brothels for being more crass and disgusting than any of the men. With her stories, Calamity Jane convinced her male counterparts that she was a feisty hell-raiser who should not be crossedâ??although she was probably cowering on the inside at what her persona was suggesting. But her stories worked and both men and society began to take notice of this curious woman. If a woman could do even half of the things she talked about, then she had to be something worth respecting.



DOUBLE HARNESS

by ANTHONY HOPE

SOME VIEWS OF THE INSTITUTION

THE FAIRY RIDE

THE WORLDLY MIND

INITIATION

THE BIRTH OF STRIFE

NOT PEACE BUT A SWORD

A VINDICATION OF CONSCIENCE

IDEALS AND ASPIRATIONS

A SUCCESSFUL MISSION

THE FLINTY WALL

THE OLIVE BRANCH

IMAGES AND THEIR WORK

THE DEAD AND ITS DEAD

FOR HIS LOVE AND HIS QUARREL

IN THE TEETH OF THE STORM

THE UPPER AND THE NETHER STONE

WANDERING WITS

THE RISING GENERATION

IN THE CORNER

THE HOUR OF WRATH

AN UNCOMPROMISING EXPRESSION

ASPIRATIONS AND COMMON SENSE

A THING OF FEAR

FRIENDS

PICKING UP THE PIECES

THE GREAT WRONG

SAMPLES OF THE BULK

TO LIFE AND LIGHT AGAIN

WITH OPEN EYES

DOUBLE HARNESS
CHAPTER I
SOME VIEWS OF THE INSTITUTION
The houseâ??a large, plain white building with no architectural pretensionsâ??stood on a high swell of the downs and looked across the valley in which Milldean village lay, and thence over rolling stretches of close turf, till the prospect ended in the gleam of waves and the silver-grey mist that lay over the sea. It was a fine, open, free view. The air was fresh, with a touch of salt in it, and made the heat of the sun more than endurableâ??even welcome and nourishing. Tom Courtland, raising himself from the grass and sitting up straight, gave utterance to what his surroundings declared to be a very natural exclamation:
“What a bore to leave this and go back to town!”
“Stay a bit longer, old chap,” urged his host, Grantley Imason, who lay full length on his back on the turf, with a straw hat over his eyes and nose, and a pipe, long gone out, between his teeth.
“Back to my wife!” Courtland went on, without noticing the invitation.
With a faint sigh Grantley Imason sat up, put his hat on his head, and knocked out his pipe. He glanced at his friend with a look of satirical amusement.
“You’re encouraging company for a man who’s just got engaged,” he remarked.
“It’s the devil of a businessâ??sort of thing some of those fellows would write a book about. But it’s not worth a book. A page of strong and indiscriminate swearingâ??that’s what it’s worth, Grantley.”
Grantley sighed again as he searched for his tobacco-pouch. The sigh seemed to hover doubtfully between a faint sympathy and a resigned boredom.
“And no end to itâ??none in sight! I don’t know whether it’s legal cruelty to throw library books and so on at your husband’s headâ??â??”
“Depends on whether you ever hit him, I should think; and they’d probably conclude a woman never would.”
“But what an ass I should look if I went into court with that sort of story!”
“Yes, you would look an ass,” Grantley agreed. “Doesn’t she give youâ??well, any other chance, you know?”
“Not she! My dear fellow, she’s most aggressively the other way.”
“Then why don’t you give her a chance?”
“What, you meanâ??â???”
“Am I so very cryptic?” murmured Grantley as he lit his pipe.
“I’m a Member of Parliament.”
“Yes, I forgot. That’s a bit awkward.”
“Besides, there are the children. I don’t want my children to think their father a scoundrel.” He paused, and added grimly: “And I don’t want them to be left to their mother’s bringing-up either.”



CAPTAIN ARTHUR & THE ELOISE

by Ripley A. (Bud) Garland

A collection of authentic stories centered around the lives of a fisherman’s family primarily in and around the City of Biloxi Mississippi and extending through the Louisiana Marsh and over to Port O’Connor, Texas and the Island of Matagorda.
At times you will chuckle, picturing yourself involved in their lives. At times you will be brought to tears as you suffer the trials and experiences with them.
The stories were passed down to the author directly by word of mouth and by sharing some of the experiences first hand with each one of the family members.
I’m certain that each one of you that reads these accounts will have had a similar life’s experience and I encourage you to keep a diary so you will be able to share your story with your family, friends, and readers as I have. It will reward you immensely as you relive them.
“You can believe it, if it’s by Ripley “



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