Free historical fiction Kindle books for 11 Dec 13

Rob Roy

by Sir Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) was a popular Scottish writer in the 19th century. Scott’s most famous work is Ivanhoe and he also wrote many other famous historical novels. This version of Scott’s Rob Roy includes a table of contents.



The Burden

by Ryan King

Ethan Mathews is worried about his mother. Visiting the nursing home is difficult when your own mother may or may not recognize you. But this time she tells him an incredible family secret that makes him doubt her sanity. Worse yet, her story might actually be true. Regardless, Ethan knows he will never see his life the same way again.



Mr. Midshipman Easy

by Frederick Marryat

Frederick Marryat (1792-1848) was an English Royal Navy officer turned writer. Marryat is best known for the semi-autobiographical novel Mr. Midshipman Easy as well as The Children of the New Forest. This version of Marryat’s Mr. Midshipman Easy includes a table of contents.



Ivanhoe

by Sir Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) was a popular Scottish writer in the 19th century. Scott’s most famous work is Ivanhoe and he also wrote many other famous historical novels. This version of Scott’s Ivanhoe includes a table of contents.



The Queen’s Favourite

by Laura Dowers

Enter into the dangerous world of the Tudors with this historical novel, based on the life of Robert Dudley, the Earl of Leicester.

Opportunist! Murderer! Traitor!

Robert Dudley is born into a family already stained by treason.

With a grandfather executed by Henry VIII, Robert witnesses his own father, John Dudley, determined to raise his family from ignominy and obscurity. Placed in the Royal Household, Robert spends his childhood years at the Royal Court, playmate to the children of Henry VIII, Edward and Elizabeth Tudor.

Robert watches his father grow in power and influence, but when John tries to make a Tudor cousin, Lady Jane Grey, queen, Mary Tudor, eldest daughter of Henry VIII, proves more than a match for him. John is forced to renounce Jane Grey and proclaim Mary queen. For their part in the Nine Days Queen affair, John and his sons are imprisoned in the Tower of London, to await trial and probable execution. Forced to renounce his Protestant faith, John and his son, Guildford, are executed on Tower Hill. Growing content in her new marriage to King Philip of Spain, Queen Mary releases the remaining Dudley brothers.

Desperate like his father to restore the family’s name and fortune, Robert persuades his brothers to join King Philip in a war against the French. The Dudleys prove themselves in battle and the taint of attainder is removed from their name. The Dudleys are traitors no longer.

The Way Back.

Unwanted at court, Robert is forced to leave London and settle down with his wife, Amy Robsart, in Norfolk, hoping one day he will be able to return to the court. His chance comes with a change of Tudor queens, when Mary dies and Elizabeth Tudor ascends the throne. Abandoning his wife, Robert rushes to her side. Elizabeth soon falls in love with Robert, and sordid rumours spread throughout Europe about their relationship, made worse when Robert’s wife dies in mysterious circumstances, and he is suspected of having her murdered. Exiled from the court, Robert has to wait to be cleared of suspicion before Elizabeth allows him to return to her.

Robert Dudley is now a free man, but Elizabeth, ever fearful of relinquishing her power, and haunted by the beheadings of her mother, Anne Boleyn, and her stepmother, Katherine Howard, will not agree to marry him, while keeping him jealously by her side.

But Robert keeps hoping, and with his heart set on becoming king, he is forced to live a double life. That is, until he falls in love with Elizabeth’s cousin, the pretty and seductive, Lettice Knollys. Lettice demands marriage and Robert, tired of waiting for Elizabeth, agrees.

The Statesman.

Meanwhile, Robert’s growing reputation as a politician means that Europe looks to him to solve their religious and territorial problems. Ever eager to improve his reputation and to prove that he is more than just the favourite of Tudor queens, Robert launches into war, and is offered the governorship of the Dutch, a title which would make him a king in all but name. He accepts the title, but when Elizabeth hears of it, she is furious, insisting that he renounce it. Robert is forced to make a humiliating exit.

He returns to England, disappointed in spirit and broken in body. Forced to take up arms again when the Spanish Armada threatens England, Robert becomes too ill to celebrate the English victory. He plans to visit the spa waters at Buxton, but does not get very far, dying en route. When Elizabeth hears the news, she is struck down and locks herself in her room, and grieves for her lost love alone.

A historical novel that offers a different perspective on the character of Robert Dudley.

Currently available as a historical fiction kindle book.



The Children of the New Forest

by Frederick Marryat

Frederick Marryat (1792-1848) was an English Royal Navy officer turned writer. Marryat is best known for the semi-autobiographical novel Mr. Midshipman Easy as well as The Children of the New Forest. This version of Marryat’s The Children of the New Forest includes a table of contents.



Democracy, An American Novel

by Henry Adams

Henry Adams (1838-1918) was the great grandson of America’s 2nd President John Adams and the grandson of America’s 6th President John Quincy Adams. Henry was also a well accomplished writer best known for the autobiography The Education of Henry Adams. This version of Adams’ Democracy, An American Novel includes a table of contents.



Esther

by Henry Adams

Henry Adams (1838-1918) was the great grandson of America’s 2nd President John Adams and the grandson of America’s 6th President John Quincy Adams. Henry was also a well accomplished writer best known for the autobiography The Education of Henry Adams. This version of Adams’ Esther includes a table of contents.



The Dark Side of the Fylfot

by Andrew Greenfield Lockhart

The Dark Side of the Fylfot is set in mediaeval Saxony, in a time of pestilence and superstition, when the Church teaches that disease is the result of sin and people fear science as akin to black magic.

Gretl is a child when the Great Mortality – the Black Death – strikes Brunswick, and not all her grandfather Sano’s learning can protect the family from tragedy. And when Gretl becomes a victim of the bitter and lustful Akhtar, Sano must confront the past and his own guilt to heal her hurt.
The Black Death returns. Gretl and her father are determined to discover the cause and find a cure. To do so, they must confront ignorance, superstition and religious dogma. Not only that – still casting his malevolent eye on the family is Akhtar, intent on pursuing his mad, perverted ambition.
But who is Akhtar and what is the origin of the strange power he wields over people?
Will Gretl learn too late that all magic is in the mind?



The Bells of Hell – Volume Three

by Peter Fischer

The third and final volume in the trilogy, follow the stories of Peter Marlow, Emma, Jake and others



The Expatriate Diaries

by Emmeline Costa-Wagner

A novella all about being an expatriate, as experienced by two different people from Durban, South Africa. The countries they emigrate to are Germany and England. There is poetry written by a third expatriate and the life story of a fourth expatriate. All of their collective life experiences are expressed in a very personal, biographical, diary format. The views and experiences are deeply emotional and at times melancholic, touching on feelings of homesickness, isolation as well as hope.



Motumbo Series II, A Slave Named Abdu (The Motumbo Series)

by Cassandra Brown

A Story of Silent Rage, Injustices and Acceptances

All while enduring the complexities of American history during slavery!

From the western shores of Africa and the royal family, to the shores of America, as a slave, This book, “A Slave Named Abdu” takes you on a path of freedom to slavery, and back to freedom.

A journey that must be true for a few. A positive story during dark times in our history, takes the reader on a journey through the mind of one exceptional African slave. A must read for fictional historians.

Scroll up and grab a copy today.



Jiro’s Dream

by Philip Groves

Jiro’s Dream is a coming-of-age story about a young Japanese boy–Jiro–who dreams of being a fighter pilot with the Imperial Japanese Navy. His family is in the silk farming and distribution business, and with a sibling already in the navy, there is no interest in serving the emperor with further military obligations. With World War II on the horizon, Jiro is sent to America on the pretext of doing a work-study program. Blending in with the Japanese/American community he makes friends and falls in love, only to witness the murder of his sweetheart by a white boy. Jiro returns to Japan and lives his dream, engaging in air combat while seeking to bring the murderer to justice.



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