Free travel Kindle books for 25 Dec 13

The GoldenYearsTravel.com GUIDE TO HOME EXCHANGE Discover how to swap your home for free accommodations around the world.

by Samuel Robbins

If you like to travel and you have more time than money, you definitely need to know about home exchange and how to do it. Let this book be your guide.

Sam and Judy Robbins have been avid home exchangers for over 20 years

and have completed more than 70 exchanges in many different parts of the world.

In this book they explain the ins and outs of home exchange and tell you exactly how to join in the adventure of exploring our world inexpensively and with the comforts of home. You and your family, by sharing your home when you are away, can find partners who will share their homes and sometimes autos, even boats, with you.

In the process you will find that you can make many new friends who will enrich

your life and expand your horizons.

At the end of the book, the authors relate the story of just one of their exchange adventures. This story illustrates in meaningful ways the wonderful world of home exchange.



How to Avoid Bed Bugs When Traveling

by B Wellman

How to Avoid Bed Bugs When Traveling. A practical guide to avoiding bed bugs in your hotel room, ships cabin, train car, and public transportation. How to guard against bringing bed bugs home in your luggage. Check list of signs to look for bed bug infestation. Check list on how to pack your luggage to avoid bed bugs. How to clean your car and keep bed bugs from infesting your car and what to do if they are living in your car.



Bermuda. Low Season, highlights. A travel guide. (Travel and Adventure)

by Hina Pandya

Written for the low season traveller in mind, this very short guide, 15 pages in normal format, Kindle readers will have more.

It includes two magazine type articles on relaxation ideas to sporting activities, bars and restaurants and suggestion for a day out in St Georges, as well as offering broad information about the basics of Bermuda, reasons to visit in low season and a little about the history of this paradise island. It includes names and addresses of places to visit and suggested food and drink, adding a few signature recipes of the island, so you can get in the mood before you leave home.

This is not intended to be an exhaustive guide of Bermuda, but light and interesting to the short term or cruise traveller. Leaving you with a small arsenal of knowledge not just for low season but also for anytime in Bermuda.



Postcards From Portland

Where do the locals eat in Portland? Where are the best places to stay? And what are the hidden gems that other tourists have never heard of?

The รข??Postcards From’ series is a collection of five short essays on different elements of a destination. Our travel writers look for interesting and unusual elements to a city, composing a collection of portraits that will introduce the reader to some of the least known aspects of the destination. These collections are essential reading for the would-be traveller. Each book is around 7,500 words in length.



A Bark In The Park: the 37 Best Places To Hike With Your Dog In Pennsylvania Dutch Country (Doggin’ America)

by Doug Gelbert

Places where you won’t be able to wipe the wag off your dog’s tail…

Have you ever considered how far you walk with your dog? If you walk just 15 minutes a day you will have walked far enough in your dog’s lifetime to cross the United States. With all that walking ahead of you, aren’t you ready for a new place to take a hike with your dog?

Pennsylvania Dutch country is a great place to hike with your dog. Within a short drive your dog can climb mountains that leave him panting, walk on some of the most historic grounds in America, explore dark ravines or circle lakes for miles and never lose sight of the water. A Bark In The Park: the 37 Best Places To Hike With Your Dog In Pennsylvania Dutch Country explores the region’s top trails with your best friend in mind…

What makes a great place to take your dog hiking? Well, how about a paw-friendly surface to trot on? Grass and sandy soil are a lot more appealing than asphalt and rocks. A variety of hikes is always good – long ones for athletic dogs and short ones for the less adventurous canine. Dogs always enjoy a refreshing place to swim as well. For dog-friendly parks our guides describe the trail options for your dog, evaluate park traffic from other users, tell you whether you will need a guide dog to find your way around and, of course, tell you how to get to the park.

While walking the dog around Pennsylvania Dutch Country, we bring along generous helpings of local history, botany, geology, architecture and more. So what are you waiting for? Your dog will want to hike past the remains of Stabe Tavern (page 83), hike past America’s largest patch of pawpaw trees north of Washington DC (page 75), hike to the world’s first bald eagle sanctuary (page 19), visit Pennsylvania’s first hard-surfaced, high-crowned road (page 53)…

THE BEST OF THE BEST…

BEST PLACE FOR YOUR DOG TO SWIM
Nolde Forest Environmental Education Center
Dogs looking to get in some dock diving practice will appreciate North Pond at Nolde Forest. Secluded North Pond is tucked away from many of the trails, use the Beech Trail to reach the Pond Loop or drive to a small parking lot on Church Road.

BEST ONE-HOUR WORKOUT FOR YOUR DOG
Susquehannock State Park
The star walk is the 1.2-mile Rhodedendron Trail that rolls through dense growth of the namesake plants; expect this rollercoaster terrain to leave your dog panting in places – especially if you take advantage of the Phites Eddy Trail to drop down to Susquehanna River for a swim.

PRETTIEST HIKE FOR YOUR DOG
Tucquan Glen Nature Preserve
Two trails envelop the Tucquan Creek. The southern leg supports most of the foot traffic as it hugs the banks all the way to the Susquehanna River and provides the best experience for enjoying the many waterfalls in the stream.

BEST HIKE TO VIEWS WITH YOUR DOG
The Pinnacle
This is not a casual canine hike. Expect to devote a solid five hours to completing the 9-mile loop to the Pinnacle and back but your dog will get the best view in Pennsylvania.

BEST HALF-HOUR HIKE WITH YOUR DOG
Kellys Run Natural Area
Near the parking area, the 3/4-mile Oliver Patton Trail was named a National Recreation Trail in 1992. This lively little track traverses a stand of Norway spruce and white pine planted in 1968.

MOST HISTORIC HIKE WITH YOUR DOG
Lebanon Valley Rail Trail
This was Robert Coleman’s Cornwall & Lebanon Railroad, the last of Cornwall’s grea tiron barons. To keep his line busy Coleman built the Mt. Gretna retreat for the rich and exhausted.

BEST PLACE TO CIRCLE A LAKE WITH YOUR DOG
Wildwood Lake Sanctuary
The main canine hike here is a circle of a little more than three miles around the lake. The lake is shoehorned into a few hundred acres dominated by major roadways and an industrial park but once the barrage of vehicular noise and public address pages disappear into background noise, the magic of the sanctuary reveals itself.



Classic American Road Trips: Walking Tours of Towns along the Baltimore Pike (Look Up, America!)

by Doug Gelbert

By 1911 it was apparent the automobile was not going to be a passing fad. Henry Ford had sold his first Model T from an assembly line in 1908 and the price of the car targeted at the middle class was dropping every year. Enthusiastic motorists formed automobile clubs which promoted the building of roads and opportunistic promoters lobbied to bring those roads into their towns.

Many of these efforts took their cues from the Good Roads Movement that was founded in May of 1880 to improve the nations roadways for bicycles. In 1912 the Good Roads Movement inspired the Lincoln Highway Association determined to build a navigable road across the continental United States. Carl Fisher, who manufactured headlights and was a co-funder of the Indianapolis Speedway, was the leading cheerleader for the transcontinental road that eventually covered 3,389 miles and passed through more than 700 cities when it opened in 1913.

In the wake of the Lincoln Highway’s success other multi-state auto trails were created, often by giving a route a name and painting it on telephone poles along the road. Hundreds of auto trails were created in America, many that brought about road improvements and amenities that more or less matched the promises of colorful advertising brochures in the competition for tourist dollars. Others not so much. The era of the auto trail was short-lived. In the 1920s automobile registration tripled and in 1926 the federal government created the U.S. Highway system utilizing numbers. Today many of the roads that made up these historic auto trails can still be traveled by adventurous motorists.

The Baltimore Pike has its roots in the stagecoach roads of the early 1800s. Heavy Conestoga wagons were following this route long before automobiles began puttering between Baltimore and Philadelphia. When the auto trail was developed it carried travelers from Maryland’s Charm City directly into the heart of Philadelphia on Market Street. With the coming of the United States Numbered Highway System in the 1920s most of Baltimore Pike was usurped by the famous US 1, the country’s longest north-south route that stretched from Fort Kent, Maine to Key West, Florida. When I-95 was dropped east of US 1 most of its importance waned but the road today still links Baltimore and Philadelphia and in places you can still get off and find the original Baltimore Pike.

There is no better way to see the towns of the Baltimore Pike than on foot. And there is no better way to appreciate what you are looking at than with a walking tour. Whether you are visiting a new town or just out to look at your own town in a new way, a walking tour is ready to explore when you are. Each walking tour describes a mix of historical and architectural and ecclesiastical landmarks. A quick primer on identifying architectural styles seen on America’s streets can be found at the end of the book.

So hit the road and look up, America!

Tour towns include:

Baltimore – Downtown East
Baltimore – Downtown West
Havre de Grace
Port Deposit
Kennett Square
Media
Philadelphia – Old City
Philadelphia – Center City



Classic American Road Trips: Walking Tours of Towns along the Dupont Highway (Look Up, America!)

by Doug Gelbert

By 1911 it was apparent the automobile was not going to be a passing fad. Henry Ford had sold his first Model T from an assembly line in 1908 and the price of the car targeted at the middle class was dropping every year. Enthusiastic motorists formed automobile clubs which promoted the building of roads and opportunistic promoters lobbied to bring those roads into their towns.

Many of these efforts took their cues from the Good Roads Movement that was founded in May of 1880 to improve the nations roadways for bicycles. In 1912 the Good Roads Movement inspired the Lincoln Highway Association determined to build a navigable road across the continental United States. Carl Fisher, who manufactured headlights and was a co-funder of the Indianapolis Speedway, was the leading cheerleader for the transcontinental road that eventually covered 3,389 miles and passed through more than 700 cities when it opened in 1913.

In the wake of the Lincoln Highway’s success other multi-state auto trails were created, often by giving a route a name and painting it on telephone poles along the road. Hundreds of auto trails were created in America, many that brought about road improvements and amenities that more or less matched the promises of colorful advertising brochures in the competition for tourist dollars. Others not so much. The era of the auto trail was short-lived. In the 1920s automobile registration tripled and in 1926 the federal government created the U.S. Highway system utilizing numbers. Today many of the roads that made up these historic auto trails can still be traveled by adventurous motorists.

Thomas Coleman du Pont, one of the three cousins who transformed the family gunpowder business into one of the world’s great corporations in the early years of the 20th century, was one of the first to dream about great auto trails. In 1908 he sketched out a plan for a divided highway that would stretch the entire length of the state of Delaware with separate lanes for automobiles, trolley lines and horse-drawn vehicles. He poured a good chunk of his fortune into the project, declaring that rather than building a monument to the sky he was laying his on the ground. A two-lane ribbon of pavement covering 103.69 miles from the Pennsylvania border at Marcus Hook to the Maryland border at Delmar was ready for traffic in 1924. By that time the visions of trolleys and horse-drawn surreys had disappeared and replaced with plans for additional automobile lanes. In 1933 the Dupont Highway became the first divided highway in the world.

With the coming of the United States Numbered Highway System the Dupont Highway became US 13 and was known interchangeably as both by Delawareans for decades. Route 13 became a multi-state route when it was extended all the way down the Delmarva Peninsula through the Eastern Shores of Maryland and Virginia. As the Delaware beaches developed as resort destinations for motorists after World War II a Route 113 spur was developed and then a high-speed toll road, Delaware Route 1, that siphoned much of the traffic off the Dupont Highway. But the world’s first divided highway can still be driven today, passing through the same towns that welcomed it a century ago.

There is no better way to see the towns of the Dupont Highway and Route 13 than on foot. And there is no better way to appreciate what you are looking at than with a walking tour. Whether you are visiting a new town or just out to look at your own town in a new way, a walking tour is ready to explore when you are. Each walking tour describes a mix of historical and architectural and ecclesiastical landmarks. A quick primer on identifying architectural styles seen on America’s streets can be found at the end of the book.

So hit the road and look up, America!

Tour towns include:

Wilmington
New Castle
Middletown
Smyrna
Dover
Seaford
Laurel
Salisbury
Princess Anne
Pocomoke City



Classic American Road Trips: Walking Tours of Towns along the Jackson Highway (Look Up, America!)

by Doug Gelbert

By 1911 it was apparent the automobile was not going to be a passing fad. Henry Ford had sold his first Model T from an assembly line in 1908 and the price of the car targeted at the middle class was dropping every year. Enthusiastic motorists formed automobile clubs which promoted the building of roads and opportunistic promoters lobbied to bring those roads into their towns.

Many of these efforts took their cues from the Good Roads Movement that was founded in May 0f 1880 to improve the nations roadways for bicycles. In 1912 the Good Roads Movement inspired the Lincoln Highway Association determined to build a navigable road across the continental United States. Carl Fisher, who manufactured headlights and was a co-funder of the Indianapolis Speedway, was the leading cheerleader for the transcontinental road that eventually covered 3,389 miles and passed through more than 700 cities when it opened in 1913.

In the wake of the Lincoln Highway’s success other multi-state auto trails were created, often by giving a route a name and painting it on telephone poles along the road. Hundreds of auto trails were created in America, many that brought about road improvements and amenities that more or less matched the promises of colorful advertising brochures in the competition for tourist dollars. Others not so much. The era of the auto trail was short-lived. In the 1920s automobile registration tripled and in 1926 the federal government created the U.S. Highway system utilizing numbers. Today many of the roads that made up these historic auto trails can still be traveled by adventurous motorists.

Driving an automobile in 1911 was a rough business, starting with cranking the motor. A few car manufacturers made concessions for women drivers but they were few and far between as motoring was mostly a man’s game. The Jackson Highway was one of the few auto trails conceived and promoted by a woman. She was Miss Alma Rittenberry as she was known around her hometown of Birmingham, Alabama. And she was well known, with active memberships in the Birmingham Equal Suffrage Association, the Poetry Society of Alabama, and the United Daughters of the Confederacy. It was Alma Rittenberry’s idea in 1911 to link Chicago with New Orleans with an easterly route through General and 7th United States President Andrew Jackson’s old stomping grounds of Nashville, Tennessee.

Rittenberry organized the Jackson Highway Association and worked feverishly to shepherd it into existence. But by 1917 in-fighting within the organization over routing led her to resign. By 1923 when the federal government assumed control of interstate roads the Jackson Highway was already a footnote in American automobile history. Today U.S. Routes 31 and 231 approximate the route of the Jackson Highway that Alma Rittenberry envisioned.

There is no better way to see the towns of the Jackson Highway than on foot. And there is no better way to appreciate what you are looking at than with a walking tour. Whether you are visiting a new town or just out to look at your own town in a new way, a walking tour is ready to explore when you are. Each walking tour describes a mix of historical and architectural and ecclesiastical landmarks. A quick primer on identifying architectural styles seen on America’s streets can be found at the end of the book.

So hit the road and look up, America!

Tour towns include:

Chicago
Indianapolis
Louisville
Nashville
Huntsville
Birmingham
Jackson
New Orleans



Classic American Road Trips: Walking Tours of Major League Baseball Teams in the Midwest (Look Up, America!)

by Doug Gelbert

There is no more classic American road trip than combing through the schedules of Major League Baseball teams and charting a course to hit as many ballparks and see as many games as possible.

There is no better way to see the big league towns of the Midwest than on foot. And there is no better way to appreciate what you are looking at than with a self-guided walking tour, ready to explore when you are on game day. Each walking tour describes a mix of historical and architectural and ecclesiastical landmarks. A quick primer on identifying architectural styles seen on America’s streets can be found at the end of the book.

So hit the road and look up, America!

Tour towns include:

Pittsburgh
Cleveland
Cincinnati
Detroit
Milwaukee
Chicago
St. Louis
Kansas City



Classic American Road Trips: Walking Tours of Towns along the Liberty Highway (Look Up, America!)

by Doug Gelbert

By 1911 it was apparent the automobile was not going to be a passing fad. Henry Ford had sold his first Model T from an assembly line in 1908 and the price of the car targeted at the middle class was dropping every year. Enthusiastic motorists formed automobile clubs which promoted the building of roads and opportunistic promoters lobbied to bring those roads into their towns.

Many of these efforts took their cues from the Good Roads Movement that was founded in May 0f 1880 to improve the nations roadways for bicycles. In 1912 the Good Roads Movement inspired the Lincoln Highway Association determined to build a navigable road across the continental United States. Carl Fisher, who manufactured headlights and was a co-funder of the Indianapolis Speedway, was the leading cheerleader for the transcontinental road that eventually covered 3,389 miles and passed through more than 700 cities when it opened in 1913.

In the wake of the Lincoln Highway’s success other multi-state auto trails were created, often by giving a route a name and painting it on telephone poles along the road. Hundreds of auto trails were created in America, many that brought about road improvements and amenities that more or less matched the promises of colorful advertising brochures in the competition for tourist dollars. Others not so much.

The era of the auto trail was short-lived. In the 1920s automobile registration tripled and in 1926 the federal government created the U.S. Highway system utilizing numbers. Today many of the roads that made up these historic auto trails can still be traveled by adventurous motorists. The Liberty Highway auto trail linked New York City with Cleveland, Ohio, then the nation’s fifth largest city. Most of the Liberty Highway became New York State Route 17 when roads were numbered. In the expressway era Route 17 was supplanted by interstate roads but today you can still get off the highway and follow large chunks of the Liberty Highway. You can even spot an occasional “Liberty Highway” sign while rumbling through the towns of the original Liberty Highway across New York’s southern tier, especially in the eastern stretch.

There is no better way to see the towns of the Liberty Highway than on foot. And there is no better way to appreciate what you are looking at than with a walking tour. Whether you are visiting a new town or just out to look at your own town in a new way, a walking tour is ready to explore when you are. Each walking tour describes a mix of historical and architectural and ecclesiastical landmarks. A quick primer on identifying architectural styles seen on America’s streets can be found at the end of the book.

So hit the road and look up, America!

Tour towns include:

Paterson
Binghamton
Elmira
Corning
Jamestown
Erie
Cleveland



Classic American Road Trips: Walking Tours of Major League Baseball Teams on the West Coast (Look Up, America!)

by Doug Gelbert

There is no more classic American road trip than combing through the schedules of Major League Baseball teams and charting a course to hit as many ballparks and see as many games as possible.

There is no better way to see the big league towns of the West Coast than on foot. And there is no better way to appreciate what you are looking at than with a self-guided walking tour, ready to explore when you are on game day. Each walking tour describes a mix of historical and architectural and ecclesiastical landmarks. A quick primer on identifying architectural styles seen on America’s streets can be found at the end of the book.

So hit the road and look up, America!

Tour towns include:

Phoenix
San Diego – Downtown
San Diego – Balboa Park
Los Angeles – Downtown
Los Angeles – Hollywood
San Francisco – Business District
San Francisco – Fisherman’s Wharf
Oakland
Seattle – Pioneer Square
Seattle – Pike Place Market



Classic American Road Trips: Walking Tours of Major League Baseball Teams in the Northeast (Look Up, America!)

by Doug Gelbert

There is no more classic American road trip than combing through the schedules of Major League Baseball teams and charting a course to hit as many ballparks and see as many games as possible.

There is no better way to see the big league towns of the Northeast than on foot. And there is no better way to appreciate what you are looking at than with a self-guided walking tour, ready to explore when you are on game day. Each walking tour describes a mix of historical and architectural and ecclesiastical landmarks. A quick primer on identifying architectural styles seen on America’s streets can be found at the end of the book.

So hit the road and look up, America!

Tour towns include:

Boston – Fenway
Boston – Beacon Hill
New York City – Manhattan Midtown
New York City – Greenwich Village
Philadelphia – Old City
Philadelphia – Center Center
Baltimore – Inner Harbor
Baltimore – Mount Vernon Place
Washington DC – The National Mall
Washington DC – The Capitol



Classic American Road Trips: Walking Tours of Major League Baseball Teams on the Southern Swing (Look Up, America!)

by Doug Gelbert

There is no more classic American road trip than combing through the schedules of Major League Baseball teams and charting a course to hit as many ballparks and see as many games as possible.

There is no better way to see the big league towns of the South than on foot. And there is no better way to appreciate what you are looking at than with a self-guided walking tour, ready to explore when you are on game day. Each walking tour describes a mix of historical and architectural and ecclesiastical landmarks. A quick primer on identifying architectural styles seen on America’s streets can be found at the end of the book.

So hit the road and look up, America!

Tour towns include:

Miami
Miami Beach
Tampa
Atlanta – Downtown
Atlanta – Midtown
Houston
Dallas
Fort Worth



Up and Up in Colorado (To Travel, Hopefully)

by Derek Knight

I admit it – I’m in love with the USA.

For a Brit it has the fascination of a place we kinda know, but it still surprises us with the odd quirk that we didn’t expect.

The countryside is just amazing, the people range from the very strange (and sometimes scary) to the most loving and welcoming people you could imagine.

This Book is about my adventures in the Colorado Rocky Mountains – wonderful, breathtaking, and scary – and the really wonderful places I went and people I met.



From Piers to Eternity

by Hazel Preller

Grand old ladies stand proudly with their legs in water! Some slightly weather-beaten, in need of a face lift, but still giving lots of pleasure and definitely worth looking after! A romantic kiss at the end of what is now considered the biggest and best pier in the world, Weston-super-Mare’s Grand Pier, prompted the author to visit and photograph 60 piers – not only to find out their history and vital statistics, but to kiss her partner (now husband!) at the end of each one. Hazel Preller’s fascinating and beautifully descriptive story, with photographs, is told with a delicious sense of humour – a wonderful history of these quintessentially Victorian seaside status symbols. May they be preserved for future generations. Go and visit!



101 Amazing Things To Do In Australia And New Zealand

by Harry Warraich

This is the fourth and final edition in the best selling 101 Travel Series.

And what a booklet it is!

Harry once again brings you 101 amazing things to do in both Australia and New Zealand, whetting your South Pacific Appetites. The booklet is filled to the brim with useful hints and tips and excellent ideas for adventures. Most of the things are cheap or free to do, giving you no excuses on your quest for backpacking or travelling glory.

Go and see the world, and ultimately, have fun whilst you do it.



Banned

by Kevin Michael

This is the book Nudists, Vegas, and the Amish don’t want you to read. It’s rude, crude, and full of attitude.

Harry never thought he’d wake up on a pool table beside a Nudist Beauty Queen. But since he caught his long time girlfriend cheating on him with a Port-O-Potty salesman the night they were supposed to move to California together, Harry has gone buck wild. From Redneck Regatta to small talk with a Sword Swallower, Cougar Bait to Hipster Heartland Hunk, Harry and Tom have embarked on the cross country Spring Break road trip that Harry’s girlfriend never let him take in college.

Also check out “Kevin Michael 30 Book Boxed Set.”



AN UNUSUAL OBSERVER (THE UNUSUAL OBSERVER)

by Federic One

The 1st ebook-diary about persons who used a famous website for social renting and had their journey in the ethereal city Rome, in Italy.

The whole diary is told by…an unusual observer.



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