Free history Kindle books for 26 Feb 15

Other Views of Naval Battles

by Gatot Soedarto

Was the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor a failure? What caused the defeat of Allies fleet in the Battle of Java Sea ? What caused the defeat of Japanese fleet in the Battle of Midway? This book try to find the answer.

The battle in Coral Sea was a very specific sea war, because for the first time in history of sea war, a task force of carrier ships confronted with another task force of carrier ships. In the Coral Sea battle, it was quite obvious that the sea state and bad weather gave a lot of influence to the morality and nuance of both sides in war. Under such a chaotic, doubtful condition and each not knowing exactly the results of their attacks, both sides tried to “mutually flee away” to save their remaining power.



Sun Tzu and Naval Strategy

by Gatot Soedarto

Analysis and review on Sun Tzu’s teaching in this book has direct context with the historical events of sea wars during this 20th century, namely the Pacific War (1941-1945) and Falklands War (1982). In Pacific War, it was proven that Sun Tzu strategy was effective at the sea battle at the Pacific Ocean, while in 1982 it was also effective as the biggest British maritime campaign since the World War II.

Those two sea battles have the principles and operations as taught by Sun Tzu for the field operation at the sea.



Sun Tzu and Naval Strategy

by Gatot Soedarto

What makes this book more interesting is that apart from description on the tactics and naval operation at sea, it also discusses various subjects that we might have forgotten for a long time in executing the management in dealing with the battle, such as the importance of team work cooperation and firmed and clear command, moral strength, discipline, leadership ethics and also quality of a certain decision as well as its momentum. Through this book, the writer has reminded and revitalized some important subjects that may not be neglected in battle management. ( Welcoming Speech of The Chief Of Naval Staff Of The Indonesian Navy, Admiral Bernard Kent Sondakh ).

Analysis and review on Sun Tzu’s teaching in this book has direct context with the historical events of sea wars during this 20th century, namely the Pacific War (1941-1945) and Falklands War (1982).

In Pacific War, it was proven that Sun Tzu strategy was effective at the sea battle at the Pacific Ocean, while in 1980s it was also effective as the biggest British maritime campaign strategy since the World War II. Those two sea battles have the principles and operations as taught by Sun Tzu for the field operation at the sea.

( Preface By Aristides Katoppo, Chairperson at Sinar Harapan, Indonesia Newspapers ).



Other Views of Naval Battles: The Battle of Malay, Java Sea, Coral Sea,Midway,and Bismarck Sea

by Gatot Soedarto

This book constituting a review on the event of naval battles in Pacific War : the Java Sea battle, the Coral Sea battle, the battle of Midway, the battle of Bismarck Sea, a review on the Falklands conflict of 1982, and some principles about the battle field at sea in relation with morality and instinct in battles.



Lessons Of The Falklands War

by Gatot Soedarto

This book constituting a review on the event of Falklands War in 1982, is trying to reveal the facts that the occurrence of such a war was caused by the political and military miscalculations. General Leopoldo Galtieri had a strategic assumption that he was so confident about, namely that the military force planned to seize Falklands would not make British mobilize its military power, but it would settle it down at the negotiation. And the quick response of British becomes the main factor determining its victory in Falklands.

The occurrence of Argentinean invasion to Falklands was due to the fact that Clausewitz’s teaching on war are still valid. The Clausewitz’s concept about a war contains three principles, and can be illustrated in the form of Model of War Triangle.

Outputs of this study are expected to be able to be used in the efforts to settle the problems containing the dispute potency among countries, so that the unnecessary victims and losses can be prevented from happening among the parties in dispute.



Portrait of a Hero

by Randall H Miller

Portrait of a Hero is the story of Lieutenant Colonel Truman Bishop Ransom who resigned the presidency of Norwich University (the nation’s oldest private military college and birthplace of the citizen soldier) to lead the 9th U.S. Infantry in the Mexican-American War. Ransom met his fate at the Fortress of Chapultepec, leaving behind a widow with four children to raise. Unfortunately, Ransom’s death in battle foreshadowed the mixture of heroism and tragedy that hovered over his three sons like a dark cloud as they eventually fought their way through the U.S. Civil War’s bloodiest battles.

Portrait of a Hero is one of several stories from the book Norwich Heroes, covering flashpoints in military history where graduates of Norwich University (the nation’s oldest private military college) have distinguished themselves on the battlefield.



Sun Tzu and Naval Strategy

by Gatot Soedarto

What makes this book more interesting is that apart from description on the tactics and naval operation at sea, it also discusses various subjects that we might have forgotten for a long time in executing the management in dealing with the battle, such as the importance of team work cooperation and firmed and clear command, moral strength, discipline, leadership ethics and also quality of a certain decision as well as its momentum. Through this book, the writer has reminded and revitalized some important subjects that may not be neglected in battle management. ( Welcoming Speech of The Chief Of Naval Staff Of The Indonesian Navy, Admiral Bernard Kent Sondakh ).

Analysis and review on Sun Tzu’s teaching in this book has direct context with the historical events of sea wars during this 20th century, namely the Pacific War (1941-1945) and Falklands War (1982).

In Pacific War, it was proven that Sun Tzu strategy was effective at the sea battle at the Pacific Ocean, while in 1980s it was also effective as the biggest British maritime campaign strategy since the World War II. Those two sea battles have the principles and operations as taught by Sun Tzu for the field operation at the sea.

( Preface By Aristides Katoppo, Chairperson at Sinar Harapan, Indonesia Newspapers ).



Lessons Of The Falklands War

by Gatot Soedarto

This book constituting a review on the event of Falklands War in 1982, is trying to reveal the facts that the occurrence of such a war was caused by the political and military miscalculations. General Leopoldo Galtieri had a strategic assumption that he was so confident about, namely that the military force planned to seize Falklands would not make British mobilize its military power, but it would settle it down at the negotiation. And the quick response of British becomes the main factor determining its victory in Falklands.

The occurrence of Argentinean invasion to Falklands was due to the fact that Clausewitz’s teaching on war are still valid. The Clausewitz’s concept about a war contains three principles, and can be illustrated in the form of Model of War Triangle.



Lessons of the Falklands War: The Greatest British Maritime Campaign in History

by Gatot Soedarto

For British, the moral factor was even built up and materialized and became a very determining power. The mobilization of British military power to Falklands at a distance of approximately 8000 miles from their homeland, including the execution of direct air raid “Black Buck Operation” classified as being too determined, was a very brave decision in a critical condition.

This is in line with the Sub Tzu’s teaching: “In critical time, a troop leader shall act just like a man climbing a certain peak by using a ladder, and then kicking his ladder backward down.” This was the thing that motivated the British combating spirit in Falklands, and brought them into a victory.



The Most Famous Landmarks of New York City: The History of the Brooklyn Bridge, Statue of Liberty, Central Park, Grand Central Terminal, Chrysler Building and Empire State Building

by Charles River Editors

*Includes pictures

*Includes accounts of the construction of each landmark by those who worked on it.

*Includes bibliographies for further reading

*Includes a table of contents

Of all the great cities in the world, few personify their country like New York City. As America’s largest city and best known immigration gateway into the country, the Big Apple represents the beauty, diversity and sheer strength of the United States, a global financial center that has enticed people chasing the “American Dream” for centuries.

New York City has countless landmarks and tourist spots, but few are as old or as associated with the city as the Brooklyn Bridge, the giant suspension bridge that spans nearly 1,600 feet as it connects lower Manhattan to Brooklyn. Indeed, the bridge is so old that Manhattan and Brooklyn represented the largest and third largest cities in America at the time of its construction, and the East River posed a formidable enough challenge that taking a ferry across could be dangerous.

Among America’s countless monuments and landmarks, none embody the principles of the nation quite like Lady Liberty, the colossal statue that stands on Liberty Island in New York Harbor. A gift from the French that was built and transported in the late 19th century, the Statue of Liberty has been a symbol of the United States’ guaranty of individual freedom, and its location took on added meaning as it welcomed millions of immigrants sailing across the Atlantic to nearby Ellis Island.

When Central Park was designed, it was an ambitious project on an almost unprecedented affair. As serene as Central Park is today, it’s hard to imagine that its creation was an entirely manmade affair consisting of dynamite blasts, tons of imported topsoil, and the labor of thousands of workers. Before the area’s transformation, the land was swampy terrain used by impoverished squatters and people who let their livestock roam the grounds, but after nearly 15 years of work, the metamorphosis was nearly complete.

Like Manhattan itself, Grand Central Station, which recently celebrated its 100th birthday, manages to be both historic and modern. Built upon the site of a former railroad depot, the current structure and layout was phased in over the course of nearly a decade in the early 20th century. Whereas the first railroad stations depressed the value of land nearby in the 19th century, the location of Grand Central was a boon that actually helped bring about construction all across Midtown, including the nearby Chrysler Building, thereby serving to transform the cityscape altogether.

It’s no surprise that New Yorkers have always wanted to construct the biggest and best structures possible, even in the early 1930s at the height of the Great Depression. Indeed, those years produced the Empire State Building, which remains the city’s most iconic building, but New York’s most famous skyscraper wouldn’t have been possible without the Chrysler Building, a landmark in its own right that was the tallest building in the world for nearly a year before its more famous counterpart’s completion. In fact, the spirit of competition between the groups working on the two buildings helped ensure that both look like they do today, and the Chrysler Building only reached the height it did because a large skyscraper at 40 Wall Street was also trying to claim the mantle of tallest building at the same time.

The Most Famous Landmarks of New York City chronicles the story of how the Big Apple’s greatest landmarks came to be. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about New York City’s most famous landmarks like never before.



Papa Golly’s Favorite Heroes: African American History

by Grace R. Norton

Papa Golly’s Favorite Heroes is a easy -to-read African American History book for young children.



The United States Capitol Building: The History and Legacy of the Seat of Congress

by Charles River Editors

*Includes pictures

*Includes accounts of the Capitol’s construction and history written in the 19th century

*Includes a bibliography for further reading

*Includes a table of contents

“The cornerstone was laid by Washington in 1793; the terrace was finished nearly a hundred years later, in 1891; and yet the Capitol will never be complete while the nation lasts. The impress of each succeeding generation will be found upon its walls, marking the intellectual, artistic and governmental advancement of the age. The great pile is national, American, human. On its walls is written the nation’s history. Its corridors resound to the footsteps of her living heroes and sages; its every stone echoes the departed voices of her greatest dead.” – George Hazelton

For over two centuries, the capital of America has been located in Washington, D.C., and among all the iconic landmarks and monuments associated with the city, nothing is as conspicuous as the Capitol, the magnificent building that houses Congress and sits on Capitol Hill at the epicenter of the city. At the same time, even though the Capitol is now one of the most recognizable buildings in the world, the image everyone is familiar with took decades to achieve, and its grand scope belies its rather chaotic history. In fact, the Capitol was partially burned by the British during the War of 1812, and its now famous dome was still under construction while the nation fought itself during the Civil War. Moreover, it’s easy to forget that the expansion of the country resulted in the addition of new Congressmen, requiring the expansion of the Capitol as the seat of the legislative branch.

The Capitol truly remained a work in progress until the end of the 19th century, and until recently, it was possible to drive cars nearly to the steps leading up to the building. That changed in the wake of the attacks of September 11, 2001, and since then, much has been done to secure the grounds, including extending the property line outward, placing permanent barriers around the building, and adding a visitor center through which tourists can be routed. Even in this new era, however, it is easy for visitors in the Capitol to sense the history around every corner; as Kansas Congressman Kevin Yoder once put it, “Certainly in the Capitol you do get moments were you sort of take a deep breath and think of all the historic figures who have been in that building, like Abraham Lincoln, who have stood right in those same rooms to make the landmark decisions.”

The history of the Capitol also serves as a reminder that the building, like the nation, both shapes and is shaped by history. There are still singed walls from the War of 1812 under the marble façade, and microscopic examination could no doubt find cracks from the vibration of distant cannon fire during the Civil War. Of course, there is no way to calculate the wear and tear caused by the millions of feet that trudge through the Capitol’s sacred halls each year, but through it all, the Capitol has managed to endure, just like the nation it represents.

The United States Capitol Building: The History and Legacy of the Seat of Congress looks at the winding history of the building and how it has changed over time. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Capitol like never before, in no time at all.



The White House: The History and Legacy of America’s Executive Mansion

by Charles River Editors

*Includes pictures

*Profiles changes made by Presidents and First Ladies from Harry Truman to Jackie Kennedy

*Includes descriptions of the White House written over the last 200 years

*Includes a bibliography for further reading

*Includes a table of contents

“Sometimes I wake at night in the White House and rub my eyes and wonder if it is not all a dream.” – Grover Cleveland

For over two centuries, the capital of America has been located in Washington, D.C., and among all the iconic landmarks and monuments associated with the city, nothing provides symbolism quite like the White House, the primary residence and office of the president. The instantly recognizable exterior and its location have ensured that the White House is associated as the main seat of power in the world’s most powerful country.

At the same time, the majesty of the White House and its tranquil setting belie its rather chaotic history, which includes being burned down by the British during the War of 1812, suffering damage during wild inaugural balls, and undergoing countless renovations. As Brian Kelly, author of Best Little Stories from the White House: More Than 100 True Stories, put it, “You could almost argue, in fact, that it wasn’t finished, truly, until yesterday. Andâ?¦who knows what they may do to it tomorrow, as it has undergone so many changes, additions, improvements, and even subtractions in its two-hundred-year history. The fact is, the White House we see today is not the White House of yore.”

Just as the interior has changed, the use of the White House has also changed considerably over time. While the White House was always intended to serve as the president’s home and a place to receive dignitaries, in the early 19th century, the White House was open to the public, to the extent that people could simply call on the president. Perhaps most notably, the White House has historically been open to public tours, albeit with exceptions made based on security issues, wars, and budget issues. The availability of the public to tour the White House is a strong reminder that while it may house the president during his term, the place ultimately belongs to the people.

The White House: The History and Legacy of America’s Executive Mansion looks at the history of the White House and how it has changed over time. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the White House like never before, in no time at all.



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