Free history Kindle books for 27 Nov 15

Mythology: Greek Legends & Gods & Goddesses of Olympus: Greece, King, Lighting

by Blake Thomas

Explore the World of Ancient Greek Mythology!

â?? Zeus â?? Athena â?? Poseidon â?? Hera â?? Hermes â?? Demeter â?? Apollo â?? Aphrodite â??

Do you recognize these names? Do you know their stories? Would you like to learn more about their mythic world?

When you download Mythology: Greek Legend; Gods & Goddesses of Olympus, you’ll discover the lore associated with these popular characters – as well as some lesser-known gods. Have you ever heard of Rhadamanthys? Thetis? The Horae? With this book – you will!

Mythology: Greek Legend; Gods & Goddesses of Olympus teaches you the origin stories, powers, associations, and famous legends of your favorite Greek gods. You’ll learn about the trident of Poseidon, which could control weather, create earthquakes, and destroy heavy boulders. You’ll chuckle at the story of how Hera, wife of Zeus, conspired with the other gods and goddesses to put him in chains. You’ll gain a new insight into the ancient world as you learn how Athena won the city of Athens for herself by besting Poseidon’s gift of horses with her gift of the olive tree.

Download Mythology: Greek Legend; Gods & Goddesses of Olympus now, and start soaking up this wealth of ancient lore!

â??â?? Scroll to the top and select the “BUY” button for instant download. â??â??

You’ll be happy you did!



Revelations of Divine Love

by Julian of Norwich

Julian of Norwich is one of the most famous Christian mystics, and her work, Revelations of Divine Love, is considered one of the greatest Christian works of the medieval era. This edition is translated by Grace Warrack.



Lord, Teach Us to Pray

by Andrew Murray

Andrew Murray was a South African pastor and a well read author of Christian literature by all denominations.  Murray wrote over 200 books, including Christian classics such as Abide in Christ and Absolute Surrender.



The Spiritual Exercises

by St. Ignatius of Loyola

Of all of the important Catholic men and women who have been venerated over the last 2,000 years, one of the faith’s most popular and influential men also lived one of the most unique lives. Like Roman Emperor Constantine the Great, St. Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556) found God about as far away from church as possible; it was during military service that he underwent a remarkable conversion.

A Spanish knight who hailed from a noble Basque family, Ignatius seemed destined for military glory until he was badly wounded in 1521 during the Battle of Pamplona. While convalescing, Ignatius began reading De Vita Christi by Ludolph of Saxony, after which he began a tireless career in service of the Catholic Church. After spending several years studying the faith, Ignatius formed the Society of Jesus in 1539, and as its Superior General, he sent followers as missionaries across Europe to create schools, colleges, and seminaries. The Jesuits remain active across the world nearly 500 years later. By 1548, he had published his famous Spiritual Exercises, which help the faithful commit themselves to Christ by conducting different mental exercises. The Spiritual Exercises continue to be wildly popular across the world today, even among non-Catholics.

By the time Ignatius died in 1556, he was one of the most important Catholics of the Counter-Reformation, and it took less than 100 years for him to be beatified and canonized as a saint. 



On the Bondage of the Will

by Martin Luther

Martin Luther was one of the most influential men of the last millennium, and the man most responsible for the Reformation that split the Catholic Church in the 16th century. A German theologian, Luther wrote at length criticizing the Church and sparked the Reformation, all while being one of the most read authors on the continent in his lifetime. His teachings included important departures from Church dogma, including the claim that absolution of sin could not be purchased. Today his 99 Theses are among the most famous works in the world.

On the Bondage of the Will is Luther’s reply to Erasmus regarding free will, and whether people can choose between good and evil. The argument was crucial to the Reformation and molded the main disagreement over free will vs. predestination.



A Body of Divinity

by Thomas Watson

Thomas Watson was an English Puritan who became a well renowned preacher and author during his time, and his writings are still widely read today. As vicar of St. Stephen’s Walbrook, Watson became famous and popular as a preacher until the Restoration, which found him removed from his position. Among his writings are All Things for Good (originally published as A Divine Cordial), The Ten Commandments, and more. 



Nature

by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson is one of the United States’ most well known authors, and one whose work is still read by every student in the country. Emerson was a lecturer, essayist and poet who became the champion of individualism and ended up becoming the Father of the Transcendentalist movement by the mid-1830s. By the middle of the century, he had published dozens of essays and given thousands of lectures on topics like self-reliance, avoiding conformity, and highlighting the connection between men and their environment. When asked to sum up his work, Emerson explained that he believed in the “infinitude of the private man.”

Emerson’s most groundbreaking work was Nature, an essay that became the foundation of Transcendentalism. Nature espoused an appreciation of nature and argued that there were inherent ties between nature and life, and Nature is often considered the first truly “American” work, in the sense that it did not derive its topic or writing style from Europe first. It also reflected the unique natural environments found across America. Henry David Thoreau was heavily influenced by Nature, which he read while at Harvard. Thoreau later became a protégé of Emerson’s and went on to live at and write about Walden as a result.

Nature is often considered the first truly “American” work, in the sense that it did not derive its topic or writing style from Europe first. It also reflected the unique natural environments found across America. Henry David Thoreau was heavily influenced by Nature, which he read while at Harvard. Thoreau later became a protégé of Emerson’s and went on to live at and write about Walden as a result. Though Emerson had anonymously published Nature, he also sensed the importance of establishing an American style. A year later, he delivered a lecture known as “The American Scholar,” which included Nature in it. In the speech, Emerson declared literary independence in the United States and urged Americans to create a writing style all their own and free from Europe. 



The Man Who Knew Too Much

by G. K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton was an English writer often referred to as “the prince of paradox.”  Chesterton wrote on a variety of different subjects including mystery fiction, religion, and literary critiques.  Chesterton is best known for creating the priest-detective Father Brown and the popular book Orthodoxy.  The Man Who Knew Too Much is a collection of eight short mystery stories.



The Barbarism of Berlin

by G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton was an English writer, theologian and poet.  Chesterton, also known as the prince of paradox, wrote on a vast variety of subjects using an unorthodox yet interesting writing style.  This edition of The Barbarism of Berlin includes a table of contents.



On Rebuke and Grace

by St. Augustine of Hippo

The Christian Church has no shortage of revered figures and saints, but it is difficult to find one that had a more decisive impact on the course of the Church’s history than Augustine of Hippo. Augustine was a bishop of Hippo Regius in Africa, but his works, sermons and writings helped hold the Church together even as the Western Roman Empire was in its death throes, to the extent that every major branch of Christianity recognizes him today. The Catholic Church has venerated him as a saint and a Doctor of the Church, Orthodox Christians also consider him a saint, and Protestants and Calvinists cite him as one of the fathers and inspirations of the Protestant Reformation. In many respects, Augustine has provided the theological bedrock for Christians for nearly 1600 years, and as theologian John Leith noted in 1990, “Augustine, the North African of Berber descent, is today the spiritual father of multitudes who are remote indeed from him racially, politically, and culturally.”

On Rebuke and Grace sets forth what is the Catholic faith concerning law, concerning free will, and concerning grace. He teaches that the grace of God by Jesus Christ is that by which alone men are delivered from evil, and without which they do absolutely no good; and this not only by the fact that it points out what is to be done, but that it also supplies the means of doing it with love, since God bestows on men the inspiration of a good will and deed. He teaches that the rebuke of evil men who have not received this grace is neither unjustâ??since they are evil by their own willâ??nor useless, although it must be confessed that it is only by God’s agency that it can avail.



The Imitation of Christ

by Thomas A. Kempis

Thomas A. Kempis’ The Imitation of Christ, first published in the early 15th century, is one of the most read devotional works. This edition is translated by William Benham



Alexander Hamilton’s Opinion as to the Constitutionality of the Bank of the United States

by Alexander Hamilton

Unfortunately, one of the best known aspects of Alexander Hamilton’s (1755-1804) life is the manner in which he died, being shot and killed in a famous duel with Aaron Burr in 1804. But Hamilton became one of the most instrumental Founding Fathers of the United States in that time, not only in helping draft and gain support for the U.S. Constitution but in also leading the Federalist party and building the institutions of the young federal government as Washington’s Secretary of Treasury.

Hamilton is also well remembered for his authorship, along with John Jay and James Madison, of the Federalist Papers. The Federalist Papers sought to rally support for the Constitution’s approval when those three anonymously wrote them, but for readers and scholars today they also help us get into the mindset of the Founding Fathers, including the “Father of the Constitution” himself. They also help demonstrate how men of vastly different political ideologies came to accept the same Constitution.

One of the biggest battles was over the chartering of a national bank, a topic that seems trivial today given the size and scope of the federal government. At the founding, however, the Southern states and Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic Party were skeptical of the necessity of a national bank, while Hamilton’s Federalists insisted that it would help the nation pay off its debts and manage its finances. Eventually Hamilton won out, but the First U.S. Bank, located in Philadelphia, was nonetheless run by a private company, ensuring limits on government control. Before the First U.S. Bank was chartered, Hamilton wrote a defense of the chartering of a national bank by asserting it was constitutional. 



Of the Morals of the Catholic Church

by St. Augustine of Hippo

The Christian Church has no shortage of revered figures and saints, but it is difficult to find one that had a more decisive impact on the course of the Church’s history than Augustine of Hippo. Augustine was a bishop of Hippo Regius in Africa, but his works, sermons and writings helped hold the Church together even as the Western Roman Empire was in its death throes, to the extent that every major branch of Christianity recognizes him today. The Catholic Church has venerated him as a saint and a Doctor of the Church, Orthodox Christians also consider him a saint, and Protestants and Calvinists cite him as one of the fathers and inspirations of the Protestant Reformation. In many respects, Augustine has provided the theological bedrock for Christians for nearly 1600 years, and as theologian John Leith noted in 1990, “Augustine, the North African of Berber descent, is today the spiritual father of multitudes who are remote indeed from him racially, politically, and culturally.”

Augustine’s voluminous writings also had the effect of making him one of antiquity’s most influential philosophers. Though he will always be remembered within the context of Christianity, Augustine studied the works of Virgil, Cicero, and the ancient Greek philosophers, providing a critical bridge between religious and secular philosophy that would in turn inspire St. Thomas Aquinas and similar thinkers. In addition to framing the concept of original sin, it was Augustine who first wrote at length on the theory of just war. Paul Henry, S.J. noted, “In the history of thought and civilization, Saint Augustine appears to me to be the first thinker who brought into prominence and undertook an analysis of the philosophical and psychological concepts of person and personality. These ideas, so vital to contemporary man, shape not only Augustine’s own doctrine on God but also his philosophy of manâ?¦”

Augustine’s legacy would have been impressive for anybody to accomplish, but it was made all the more amazing by the fact that he spent most of his early years living irreverently. Though raised a Christian, he abandoned his faith until he was in his early 30s, and one of his prayers would become notorious: “Grant me chastity and continence, but not yet” He was teaching rhetoric in Africa before a series of experiences led to his conversion back to Christianity in 386, thus spending the last 45 years of his life in the service of God. 



The Art of War

by Sun Tzu

Sun Tzu is one of the most famous authors in history, and TheArt of War remains the most famous military treatise ever written, but it is unclear whether the man himself ever existed. That said, historians believe the man did exist, and that the famous treatise was written for King Ho Lu, who Sun Tzu may have served as a general in the 5th or 6th century B.C. The military maxims, while timeless, do not refer to any concrete time in history. 



The Seven Words on the Cross

by St. Robert Bellarmine

Cardinal Robert Bellarmine was a Jesuit priest, and one of the most important figures of the Counter Reformation, a period of Catholic revival which started after the Council of Trent in the middle of the 16th century.  Canonized in 1930 and declared a Doctor of the Church a year later, his feast day is on September 17th.



A Jesuit Cardinal, Robert Bellarmine, 1542-1621

by William Harris Rule

Cardinal Robert Bellarmine was a Jesuit priest, and one of the most important figures of the Counter Reformation, a period of Catholic revival which started after the Council of Trent in the middle of the 16th century.  Canonized in 1930 and declared a Doctor of the Church a year later, his feast day is on September 17th.

Rule’s A Jesuit Cardinal is a wonderful chronology of the life of Cardinal Bellarmine.  



Arizona Genealogy Free Resources Sourcebook

by Diana DeLugan

Genealogy research can be expensive. But did you know there is an extensive body of free resources available?

Arizona Genealogy Free Resources Sourcebook directs you to numerous free physical resources and provides over a 1,000 links to local, state, and federal resources useful to expand your Arizona genealogy research. Many resources like the chapters on border crossings, census records, and land records are beneficial to all researchers. Resources include:

– free census records

– free vital statistic records

– online business and city directories

– over fifty free downloadable Arizona genealogy related eBooks

– land records searches with downloadable plats and land patents

– professional license searches

– criminal records locations and court case locators

– where to view military, immigration, and citizenship records

– where to locate biographies of notable Arizonans

– locations where records may be located organized by county

– and more!

Family historian and eighth generation Arizonan Diana DeLugan invites you to discover why many call Arizona Genealogy Free Resources Sourcebook their favorite Arizona genealogy research companion.



Liberty Boiling

by G Clark Hansen

From the founding of the United States, the stock that have immigrated to America have been of a special breed. They simply wanted to find a better life than that which they left behind in their native lands. But the American dream of freedom, self-determination and opportunity are under assault as never before. The Jensen and Lin families, from backgrounds as different as anyone could imagine and from opposite sides of a shrinking globe, must find a way to join forces and confront this growing cloud that hangs over America.



KWANZAA: An African- American Celebration and Tradition In America (The state of Black America Book 1)

by Nemasa Asetra

Nemasa Asetra’s view of Kwanzaa and the decline of the Black Experience unfolds in her view of the State of Black America, mental health crisis and beyond with the upsurgence of homelessness, joblessness and the decline in the African-American’s education.



The Writings of Silvanus

by Dana Cottrell

This book is a historical Christian fiction based on the time of Christ. It is about a Jewish family that relocates from Jerusalem to a small village along the Mediterranean Sea, and covers their interactions with the local Phoenician village, Romans, Christian evangelists, and the shipping trade along the eastern Mediterranean and Aegean seas. One of the family members documents events covering three generations of his family and saves the scrolls in eighteen urns that were later discovered during the twentieth century. The book focuses on the writer’s youngest sister who becomes the most powerful and richest woman in Greece



Civil War Humor 1861-1865

by Charles A. Mills

The Civil War was the costliest war in American history. Some 600,000 people died. As a percentage of population this would be equivalent to five million deaths in present day America. Despite the horrors of war, or maybe because of them, humor still had a place in American life. Abraham Lincoln best summed up the role of humor in the war when he said, “With the fearful strain that is on me night and day, if I did not laugh I should die.”

A brief but fascinating look at humor in the Civil War including: (1) Stories Around the Campfire, (2) Parody, (3) the Irish, (4) Humorous Incidents, (5) Civil War Humorists, and (6) Lincoln.



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