Free historical fiction Kindle books for 30 Nov 15

The Wake: And What Jeremiah Did Next

by Colm Herron

The year is 1968. Jeremiah Coffey is a twenty-seven-year-old teacher — Catholic, conservative and plagued by guilt on account of his relationship with a beautiful bisexual called Aisling O’Connor.

Aisling is everything that Jeremiah is not — feisty and radical, angry and committed. She is a leading figure in the Irish civil rights movement and is planning to help organize a potentially explosive protest march inspired by the US black civil rights activists’ Selma to Montgomery marches of three years before. The scene is set for a brutal confrontation to match the 1965 Bloody Sunday in Selma.

categories: Romance, Literary, Civil Rights, LGBT, Irish Troubles, Religion, Humor



The Anne of Green Gables Collection

by Lucy Maud Montgomery

L.M. Montgomery was a Canadian author best known for writing the classic Anne of Green Gables series.  In total, Montgomery published 20 novels and more than 500 short stories, and Anne of Green Gables is one of history’s most popular titles.



A Tramp Abroad

by Mark Twain

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, is perhaps America’s favorite author. A quick-witted humorist who wrote travelogues, letters, speeches, and most famously the novels The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), Twain was so successful that he became America’s biggest celebrity by the end of the 19th century. Despite writing biting satires, he managed to befriend everyone from presidents to European royalty.  

A Tramp Abroad was written as part of a series of five non-fiction travel books by Twain, documenting his journey through central and southern Europe with a male companion, closely based on his friend Joseph Twichell. It is similar to and often considered a sequel of the very popular The Innocents Abroad.



The Tale of Genji

by Murasaki Shikibu

The Tale of Genji is a Japanese classic, and considered one of the first novels ever written.



Daniel Deronda

by George Eliot

George Eliot was one of the best writers of the 19th century, but By George, this was no man. Instead, George Eliot was the pen name of Mary Anne Evans, a skilled female novelist who wanted to make sure her work was taken seriously by using a masculine pen name. The practice was widely used in Europe in the 19th century, including by the Bronte sisters. 

Regardless of her name, her work became well known in its time for realism and its psychological insight, including novels like Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch (1871-72), and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of them set in provincial England. Her work also infused religion and politics, and Victorian Era readers were fond of her books’ depictions of society. 



Shipmate: A Royal Regard Prequel Novella (The Sailing Home Series Book 3)

by Mariana Gabrielle

The heavy hands and sharp tongues of Bella Smithson’s family have left her almost too timid to converse with a gentleman, much less conduct a husband hunt. Unfortunately, her overbearing aunt and managing cousin are determined to help her escape her black-hearted father and brothers.

Thanks to the Prince of Wales, retiring shipping magnate Myron Clewes has an ever-growing fortune, a fresh-minted peerage, a brand-new flagship, and an impossible set of requirements for a bride. Not least, she must be willing to leave England and everything she knows, possibly for good, in less than two months’ time.

Bella’s Happy-Ever-After in Royal Regard had its origins in a Happier-Than-She-Expected with her first husband, Baron Holsworthy, who gave her the confidence to steady her sea legs, take her life by the helm, and command her own voice, empowering a shy, young girl and unlikely adventurer to grow into one of King George IV’s trusted advisors.



Princess Wanted: An Alpha Billionaire Prince Series (Three Princes Need A Wife – Book 3 – The Royal Ball)

by Autumn Star

#1 in Philanthropy and Romance! Yes Dreams Do Come True, And Stories Like This Make You Believe Again! Princess Wanted is the final story in our modern day Prince Trilogy

Three very different but very rich royal brothers have come of age. They are true modern Princes. In this sweet clean lovely romance we meet, Samantha, she is a local girl who just wants to save her small country from going broke with the high oil prices. She’s an activist that you can’t resist

Prince Will Throws a Royal Ball To Find the Perfect Wife

Sometimes love and fate have a different plan

  • Prince Will is supposed to choose the best match for not only himself, but the crown. An honor bound good man he will do what is right for his small struggling kingdom because although a figure head now, they still wield power and leadership. When he comes up against Samantha he has never met a women that cares about economic freedom enough to fight for it. A true woman of the people.

    Samantha believes things can be different. She also believes that Prince Will can make a difference in changing the way people choose to deal with their energy crisis instead of giving in to big oil and their demands. She and the prince are on opposite sides, but love as always is the great equalizer…

Imagine The Man You Love Turned Out To Be A Billionaire Prince

>> Download This Book Today <<

Tags: Love, Romance, Christian, Sweet, Clean, Billionaire, Alpha, Elephant Rescue, green living, civics



The Pastor’s Wife

by Elizabeth von Arnim

Elizabeth von Arnim was a British author and Countess best known for writing semi-autobiographical works that served as satirical commentaries of European society during her time.



The Picture of Dorian Gray

by Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900) was an extremely popular Irish writer and poet who wrote in different forms throughout his career and became one of London’s most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. Today he is remembered for his epigrams, plays and the strange circumstances of his imprisonment, followed by his early death.

At the turn of the 1890s, Wilde refined his ideas about the supremacy of art in a series of dialogues and essays, and incorporated themes of decadence, duplicity, and beauty into his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890). The opportunity to construct aesthetic details precisely, and combine them with larger social themes, drew Wilde to write drama. He wrote Salome (1891) in French in Paris but it was refused a license. Unperturbed, Wilde produced four society comedies in the early 1890s, which made him one of the most successful playwrights of late Victorian London. Wilde reached the height of his fame and success with The Importance of Being Earnest (1895).



Silas Marner

by George Eliot

George Eliot was one of the best writers of the 19th century, but By George, this was no man. Instead, George Eliot was the pen name of Mary Anne Evans, a skilled female novelist who wanted to make sure her work was taken seriously by using a masculine pen name. The practice was widely used in Europe in the 19th century, including by the Bronte sisters. 

Regardless of her name, her work became well known in its time for realism and its psychological insight, including novels like Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch (1871-72), and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of them set in provincial England. Her work also infused religion and politics, and Victorian Era readers were fond of her books’ depictions of society. 



Far from the Madding Crowd

by Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy was an English writer and poet in the Romantic era.  Hardy was greatly influenced by Charles Dickens and William Wordsworth, and he went on to write critically acclaimed classics like Far From the Madding Crowd and Tess of the d’Ubervilles.

Far from the Madding Crowd is one of Hardy’s greatest novels and has been made into several films. The story is full of twists and turns, romance and revenge as men fight for Bathsheba Everdene.



The Swiss Family Robinson

by Johann David Wyss

Johann David Wyss (March 4, 1743 – January 11, 1818) was a Swiss pastor who earned lasting fame for writing The Swiss Family Robinson, a novel inspired by Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe. While Crusoe was a lone castaway, The Swiss Family Robinson was written to have a father figure impart wisdom to his children, teaching them important lessons.  
 
The Swiss Family Robinson involves a family being shipwrecked, allowing the father to teach his four sons about Christian values and morality, including naturalism and self-reliance. The influence of Enlightenment thinkers like Rousseau is evident in the writings of the Swiss pastor. The family encounters several adventures, with each one teaching the children certain lessons. Today the novel is considered a classic of Western literature.



The Mill on the Floss

by George Eliot

George Eliot was one of the best writers of the 19th century, but By George, this was no man. Instead, George Eliot was the pen name of Mary Anne Evans, a skilled female novelist who wanted to make sure her work was taken seriously by using a masculine pen name. The practice was widely used in Europe in the 19th century, including by the Bronte sisters. 

Regardless of her name, her work became well known in its time for realism and its psychological insight, including novels like Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch (1871-72), and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of them set in provincial England. Her work also infused religion and politics, and Victorian Era readers were fond of her books’ depictions of society. 



John Burnet of Barns: A Romance

by John Buchan

John Buchan was a Scottish writer and Unionist politician who served as Governor General of Canada.  Buchan wrote a vast amount of books including the Richard Hannay novels that have recently been turned into a popular British television show.  This edition of John Burnet of Barns: A Romance includes a table of contents.



Ivanhoe

by Sir Walter Scott

Of all the writers in the 19th century, the preeminent one was Sir Walter Scott, whose works were so beloved that he had an international fan base well before he died. The Scotsman is still considered one of the greatest writers of the English language, and his most famous and popular title is Ivanhoe.

Ivanhoe is a classic historical novel that practically popularized the genre. Set in 12th century England, Ivanhoe sparked interest in the Middle Ages as a whole, and Scott’s writing style made Romanticism as a movement prominent as well. Ivanhoe remains a must-read for anyone interested in literature.



Adam Bede

by George Eliot

George Eliot was one of the best writers of the 19th century, but By George, this was no man. Instead, George Eliot was the pen name of Mary Anne Evans, a skilled female novelist who wanted to make sure her work was taken seriously by using a masculine pen name. The practice was widely used in Europe in the 19th century, including by the Bronte sisters. 

Regardless of her name, her work became well known in its time for realism and its psychological insight, including novels like Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch (1871-72), and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of them set in provincial England. Her work also infused religion and politics, and Victorian Era readers were fond of her books’ depictions of society. 

Adam Bede, Eliot’s first novel, tells a tale of love between characters in a rural community. The interwoven plot has been termed by some as a “love rectangle.”



Hard Times

by Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens needs no formal introduction, having been the most popular English writer of the 19th century and still one of the most popular writers in history today. Dickens was obsessed with reading, making him a natural journalist by the age of 20, when he began a career in journalism. Along the way, he also began writing his own short stories and materials, often serializing them in monthly installments in publications, a popular method of publishing in the 19th century. Unlike most writers, Dickens would not write an entire story before it began its serialization, allowing him to work on the fly and leave plot lines up in the air with each opportunity. 

By the time he died at the relatively young age of 58 from a stroke, he was already Europe’s most famous writer. His obituary noted that Dickens was a “sympathiser with the poor, the suffering, and the oppressed.” Dickens was interred in Westminster Abbey, a rare honor bestowed only among the greatest and most accomplished Britons. 
Many of Dickens’ novels were written with the concept of social reform in mind, and Dickens’ work was often praised for its realism, comic genius and unique personalities. At the same time, however, Dickens’ ability as a writer was nearly unrivaled, with his ability to write in prose unquestioned and unmatched. 



Winesburg, Ohio

by Sherwood Anderson

Sherwood Anderson’s short story compilation, Winesburg, Ohio, is structured around George Willard.  The fictional town in the stories is somewhat based off Anderson’s childhood memoris of his hometown Clyde, Ohio.



Northanger Abbey

by Jane Austen

Jane Austen was an English author best known for her books of romantic fiction.  Despite writing many books that are now considered classics, Austen did not gain much fame during her lifetime, likely due to being a woman.  Austen was just 41 years old when she died yet she is still considered one of the best writers of English literature.  Northanger Abbey was Austen’s first completed novel and follows the life of Catherine Morland, a young girl who is fond of Gothic novels.



The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

by Daniel Defoe

Daniel Defoe (1660?-1731) was a prolific English writer who became one of the first Western writers to write novels and turn them into a sought after literary genre. During his life, Defoe wrote more than 500 books, pamphlets and journals on topics as wide ranging as politics, crime, religion, psychology, supernatural events, and even economics.

While those are all impressive accomplishments, Defoe’s name has lived on through Robinson Crusoe, one of the first and finest novels ever written. The book is written as a fictional autobiography of Robinson Crusoe, a castaway who spends nearly 30 years on a tropical island, where he encounters all kinds of danger and adventures. Published in the early 18th century, the novel may have been inspired by a real Scottish castaway, Alexander Selkirk, who lived for nearly 5 years on a Pacific Island. That island’s name has since been changed to Robinson Crusoe Island. Robinson Crusoe was a stark departure from the typical literature of the day, which was still based on ancient mythology, legends, and history.



The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) may have traveled more than the characters in some of his critically acclaimed and world renowned novels. Stevenson was a Scottish novelist, poet, and traveling writer who wore classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped and Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Stevenson was so accomplished that he was a celebrity during his lifetime, and he left an influence on great writers who followed him, including Hemingway and Kipling. At the same time, his works are easy enough to read that they can be taught in classrooms across the world to teenagers.

One of his most famous stories is the one about the affable Dr. Jekyll, who carries with him a dark side that manifests itself as Mr. Hyde. The famous story is part of the English vernacular, with people often referring to their Jekyll and Hyde sides.



Oliver Twist

by Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens needs no formal introduction, having been the most popular English writer of the 19th century and still one of the most popular writers in history today. Dickens was obsessed with reading, making him a natural journalist by the age of 20, when he began a career in journalism. Along the way, he also began writing his own short stories and materials, often serializing them in monthly installments in publications, a popular method of publishing in the 19th century. Unlike most writers, Dickens would not write an entire story before it began its serialization, allowing him to work on the fly and leave plot lines up in the air with each opportunity. 

By the time he died at the relatively young age of 58 from a stroke, he was already Europe’s most famous writer. His obituary noted that Dickens was a “sympathiser with the poor, the suffering, and the oppressed.” Dickens was interred in Westminster Abbey, a rare honor bestowed only among the greatest and most accomplished Britons. 
Many of Dickens’ novels were written with the concept of social reform in mind, and Dickens’ work was often praised for its realism, comic genius and unique personalities. At the same time, however, Dickens’ ability as a writer was nearly unrivaled, with his ability to write in prose unquestioned and unmatched. 

One of Dickens’ most popular novels is Oliver Twist, the story of an orphan who gets led to a life of crime.



Lost Gold: A Dean Rand Novel

by Aaron Gagnon

Dean Rand worried that his days as an ex-Delta Force Operator would be filled with shuffleboard and 5pm dinners. But after a call from an enigmatic and bold billionaire, Rand knew that his post-military life would be much more than he bargained for.

A chilling murder in the Special Collections room of the Georgetown University Lauinger Library, a devastating explosion and underwater rescue off the coast of Mexico, the disappearance of many of the world’s top scientists, and the emergence of a wealthy Mexican industrialist, all conspire to spur Rand into action. Now, Rand and his loyal comrade-in-arms Blue McConnell, race to decipher the many pieces to this global puzzle, and ultimately, to save the world from complete and certain destruction.



Cousin Betty (La Cousin Bette)

by Honore de Balzac

Honoré de Balzac (20 May 1799 – 18 August 1850) was a French novelist and playwright best known for a sequence of short stories and novels collectively entitled La Comédie humaine, which presents a panorama of French life in the years after the 1815 fall of Napoleon.

Due to his keen observation of detail and unfiltered representation of society, Balzac is regarded as one of the founders of realism in European literature. He is renowned for his multi-faceted characters, who are complex, morally ambiguous and fully human. His writing influenced many subsequent novelists such as Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Gustave Flaubert, Henry James, and William Faulkner. Many of Balzac’s works have been made into or have inspired films, and they are a continuing source of inspiration for writers, filmmakers and critics.

Cousin Bette is one of Balzac’s most famous works. Set in 19th century Paris, it’s a novel about a woman who wants to destroy her extended family, much of which is accomplished through seduction.



A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

by Mark Twain

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, is perhaps America’s favorite author. A quick-witted humorist who wrote travelogues, letters, speeches, and most famously the novels The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), Twain was so successful that he became America’s biggest celebrity by the end of the 19th century. Despite writing biting satires, he managed to befriend everyone from presidents to European royalty.  

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court is one of the best known Twain stories, and also one of the most unique. The story is about an American who goes back in time and finds himself in King Arthur’s England. The satirical Twain uses the work to launch a social commentary on the English society, a thinly veiled critique of the contemporary times despite the flashback.



Little Women

by Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott (1832 – 1888) needs little introduction, as she is one of the most famous American female authors, whose most famous work is Little Women.  She also served as a nurse for six weeks during the Civil War at Union Hospital in Georgetown, and her letters were compiled to create Hospital Sketches. The novel follows the lives of four sisters as they grow into adulthood.  



The Prince and the Working Woman (Desert Prince Book 1)

by Kat Attalla

THE ROYAL PRINCE OF TOUZAR BELIEVES EVERY WOMAN HAS A PRICEâ?¦

Prince Hamid Khalid is not looking for love. Since coming of age he has watched a carnival-like parade of women vie for his attention. But they are more interested in his title and bank account than his sardonic personality.

…UNTIL HE MEETS A WOMAN WHO CAN’T BE BOUGHT

Amanda Wilkes, abuse survivor and hard-core feminist isn’t looking for love either. Especially not with a sexy chauvinist like the prince. Opening an international community center under his direction in the exotic Middle Eastern country, however is a job of a lifetime.

While working in close proximity an attraction develops. The two decide to share a purely physical, unemotional, relationship. The affair works well until the unthinkable happened.

CAN TWO STUBBORN LONERS ADMIT TO THE LOVE NEITHER BELIEVES EXISTS?



Heart of Darkness

by Joseph Conrad

One of the greatest English writers of the 19th century was a Polish-born man who couldn’t even speak English fluently until he had entered adulthood. Nevertheless, Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) went on to have a well-regarded literary career that bridged Romanticism and Modernism while also covering the zenith and twilight of the British empire. Conrad used his experience within the British empire to write novels and stories that often used the sea and navy as a setting, juxtaposing the individual human spirit with the collective duty and honor of the British navy. And though it was a second-language, Conrad mastered English prose.

Heart of Darkness is considered one of the greatest novels of modern literature. It chronicles the experiences of the fictitious Charles Marlow during his voyage along the Congo River.



Ragged Dick

by Jr. Horatio Alger

If you’ve ever used the phrase “rags to riches,” you owe that to Horatio Alger, Jr. (1832-1899), who popularized the idea through his fictional writings that also served as a theme for the way America viewed itself as a country. Alger’s works about poor boys rising to better living conditions through hard work, determination, courage, honesty, and morals was popular with both adults and younger readers.

Alger’s writings happened to correspond with America’s Gilded Age, a time of increasing prosperity in a nation rebuilding from the Civil War. His lifelong theme of rags to riches continued to gain popularity but has gradually lessened since the 1920s. Still, readers today often come across Ragged Dick and stories like it in school.



Treasure Island

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) may have traveled more than the characters in some of his critically acclaimed and world renowned novels. Stevenson was a Scottish novelist, poet, and traveling writer who wore classics like Kidnapped and Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Stevenson was so accomplished that he was a celebrity during his lifetime, and he left an influence on great writers who followed him, including Hemingway and Kipling. At the same time, his works are easy enough to read that they can be taught in classrooms across the world to teenagers.

One of his most popular books is Treasure Island, which all but created every stereotype now associated with pirates. The book is a coming of age adventure that mixes character studies, action, a vivid setting, and commentary on the ambiguity of morality, as embodied by the memorable Long John Silver. Its influence on the popularity of historical pirates is unmistakable, with its inclusion of treasure maps where X marks the spot, schooners, tropical islands, and one legged pirates with parrots on their shoulders.



War and Peace

by Leo Tolstoy

Leo Tolstoy (September 9, 1828 – November 20, 1910) was a Russian writer who earned fame and global renown for his novels War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Writing during the late 19th century, Tolstoy lived during a literary period in which Realism flourished, and today his two novels are considered the apex of realist fiction. Dostoevsky himself declared Anna Karenina “flawless as a work of art,” and it is invariably included among discussions of the greatest novels ever.



The Necklace II: Back to Brighton: Cyber Monday Free

by Linda S. Rice

It’s been five months since Susan and her best friend, Lynn, returned from their short journey to the past. A gifted woman had sent Susan back to cure her of an obsession with James, a man she had fantasized about all her life. The steamy affair sated Susan’s curiosity and taught her a valuable lesson. She is glad to be home but feels incomplete. When she discovers that leaving her ballerina necklace in 1962 had created a link to her former obsession, she must seek help in returning to the past to retrieve it.

November 1962: Susan is once again in the Dusky Club where James and the boys who will one day become the most famous band of all time are still engaged to play. Will Susan be able to find her necklace bring it back into the present? Will the link between her and James finally be broken?

Note – This book contains erotica.



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