Free historical fiction Kindle books for 12 Dec 15

Leader of Battles (IV): Drystan

by David Pilling

Britannia, 491 AD. Twelve years have passed since the British victory at Mount Badon. For the first time since the departure of the legions, Britannia is at peace. The Saxons are quiet in the east, towns and villages once again flourish, and Artorius reigns supreme as High King.

Yet the hard-won peace is fragile. Trouble flares in the north, inside the Kingdom of Rheged, where civil war threatens to break out over territory and the hand of a royal princess. Artorius once again rides out at the head of his famous Companions to restore order, but the war only exposes tension among his followers. The long peace has bred resentment, and a new generation of warriors grow to manhood who care little for the past.

While Artorus struggles to maintain order in Rheged, a new and far more deadly enemy rises in the far south-west. Drystan of Kernow, bastard son of King Marcus, slays a famous pirate in single combat. Having earned a glorious reputation, he is sent to Hibernia to fetch back a young bride for his father. The bride is Esyllt, daughter of King Niall. Drystan falls in love with the girl and abducts her, threatening to start a new war that will tear Britannia all to pieces.

Artorius is forced to move swiftly to save his kingdom. The ageing warlord soon discovers that no man is invincible, and suffers defeat, betrayal and personal loss in his fight against Drystan. Meanwhile, as the British kingdoms falter, the shadow in the east continues to gather strength.

Book Four of the Leader of Battles series follows the tale of Drystan and Esyllt, better-known as the doomed lovers Tristan and Isolde. This version sets their romance against the harsh, unforgiving backdrop of post-Roman Britannia, where treachery is rife, and darkness closes over the head of the High King.



Alba Rosa Foe

by Dana Arpquest

Alys arrives in England in the heart of the war of the Cousins, and is to become a white Rose of York. However she has other plans: she wants freedom, but it all changes when she comes across love, scheming and treachery. Exiled from court, she now fights to survive.

Alba Rosa Foe, a novel where history mingles with fiction, romance with war and life with death.



Nana

by Emile Zola

Ã?mile Zola is one of the greatest writers of the 19th century, and one of France’s best known citizens. In his life, Zola was the most important exemplar of the literary school of naturalism and a major figure in the political liberalization of France. Around the end of his life, Zola was instrumental in helping secure the exoneration of the falsely accused and convicted army officer Alfred Dreyfus, a victim of anti-Semitism. The Dreyfus Affair was encapsulated in the renowned newspaper headline J’Accuse.

More than half of Zola’s novels were part of this set of 20 collectively known as Les Rougon-Macquart. Unlike Honore de Balzac, who compiled his works into La Comedie Humaine midway through, Zola mapped out a complete layout of his series. Set in France’s Second Empire, the series traces the “environmental” influences of violence, alcohol and prostitution which became more prevalent during the second wave of the Industrial Revolution. The series examines two branches of a family: the respectable Rougons and the disreputable Macquarts for five generations. Zola explained, “I want to portray, at the outset of a century of liberty and truth, a family that cannot restrain itself in its rush to possess all the good things that progress is making available and is derailed by its own momentum, the fatal convulsions that accompany the birth of a new world.” 



The Ohio River Trilogy: Betty Zane, Spirit of the Border, and The Last Trail

by Zane Grey

Zane Grey (1872 – 1939) was an American author best known for writing Western novels, with his most famous being Riders of the Purple Sage. That work is widely considered the greatest Western ever written, and Grey remains one of the most famous authors of the genre. Grey also wrote many other novels on fishing and baseball.



Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry

by W. B. Yeats

One of the most famous poets of the 20th century, William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) was so popular and renowned during his time that he was the leader of what came to be known as the Irish Literary Revival, on the strength of his short stories and vivid poetry. Eventually it would lead to his winning a Nobel Prize in 1923. It’s no surprise that Ireland loved its home grown son; the Nobel Prize Committee credited him for “inspired poetry, which in a highly artistic form gives expression to the spirit of a whole nation.”

Before Yeats won awards, his interest in spirituality and folklore drove him to write at length about Irish mythology and the occult before the turn of the 20th century. In many ways, it was Yeats who popularized the characters of Celtic mythology and medieval Irish folklore for contemporaneous audiences.



Cranford

by Elizabeth Gaskell

Elizabeth Gaskell was a British author during the Victorian era, and her novels are notable for detailed descriptions of the different classes of society in 19th century Britain.  Cranford is a novel about a fictional town modeled closely after one Gaskell was familiar with.  The story features a series of episodes in the life of Mary Smith.



Inshallah, Habibi: A Satirical Novel in Disguise

by Haitham Alsarraf

When the Twin Towers are hit on September 11, 2001, Mohammed’s success as a stockbroker in a tiny Middle Eastern country quickly escalates, encouraging his love to debauch women while fighting off traditional marriage, incessant social corruption and Western hegemony, all in a closed wealthy Muslim country, until he soon realizes that his promiscuous life erodes and corrodes his sanity.

He eventually meets a younger bisexual woman who he thinks might be worthy of marriage. However, that changes when she takes him farther in a downward spiral of self-analysis and destruction.

By the summer of 2008, when worldwide financial markets are about to correct, Mohammed ultimately senses his own spirituality being stolen by the very individuals he has confronted and the society he has loved to hate. The story is a satire yet a serious social critique depicting many critical points which have (mis)shaped Kuwait, leading Mohammed to point out the absurdities of the personalities and situations he finds himself in.



Simon Of Cyrene: A Christian Novel

by Joseph Cavilla

While on a family holiday in Jerusalem, Simon, a carpenter from Cyrene, is singled out by Roman soldiers and forced to carry Christ’s cross. A miraculous conversion ensues, and Simon’s life is forever transformed. Returning home, Simon is shadowed by a member of the Jerusalem Sanhedrin, and is soon unwittingly thrust into the perilous world of the nascent Christian religion.

Like Simon their father, Rufus and Alexander are carpenters. After helping Simon retrofit Captain Marius’ Corbita cargo vessel with a new and revolutionary passenger cabin, they become enamoured with the sea and are soon travelling to Jerusalem and beyond. While the nineteen year old Rufus pursues the forbidden love of a beautiful young Roman woman, Alexander travels to the Holy Land to meet with the great apostles. In Judea, Alexander meets and falls in love with an alluring Christian maiden, only to be initiated into the trials and tribulations so common to the followers of Jesus at the time. Back in Cyrene, Simon works diligently at “fishing men”, and plays an invaluable role in the emergence of the early church.

Set in the historical world of the Roman Empire, Simon Of Cyrene is a warm tale of family bonds, romantic love, adventure, miracles, and unbridled faith. It follows a fictitious family of endearing characters as they meet and interact with historical biblical personages, and poses an intriguing question: Could one of the bible’s most humble characters have helped to shape the structure of the Christian faith as we know it?



The Fortune of the Rougons

by Emile Zola

Ã?mile Zola is one of the greatest writers of the 19th century, and one of France’s best known citizens. In his life, Zola was the most important exemplar of the literary school of naturalism and a major figure in the political liberalization of France. Around the end of his life, Zola was instrumental in helping secure the exoneration of the falsely accused and convicted army officer Alfred Dreyfus, a victim of anti-Semitism. The Dreyfus Affair was encapsulated in the renowned newspaper headline J’Accuse.

More than half of Zola’s novels were part of this set of 20 collectively known as Les Rougon-Macquart. Unlike Honore de Balzac, who compiled his works into La Comedie Humaine midway through, Zola mapped out a complete layout of his series. Set in France’s Second Empire, the series traces the “environmental” influences of violence, alcohol and prostitution which became more prevalent during the second wave of the Industrial Revolution. The series examines two branches of a family: the respectable Rougons and the disreputable Macquarts for five generations. Zola explained, “I want to portray, at the outset of a century of liberty and truth, a family that cannot restrain itself in its rush to possess all the good things that progress is making available and is derailed by its own momentum, the fatal convulsions that accompany the birth of a new world.” 



The Return of the Native

by Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy was an English writer and poet in the Romantic era.  Hardy was greatly influenced by Charles Dickens and William Wordsworth, and he went on to write critically acclaimed classics like Far From the Madding Crowd and Tess of the d’Ubervilles



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