Free biographies and memoirs Kindle books for 14 Dec 15

Bangkok Boy Bar: My pilgrimage through sex, romance, love, crushing heartbreak, and self-discovery among alluring young gay Thai boys

by Richard Vohl

Now an Amazon Best Selling Book! #1 in GLBT Travel

A sensuous, beautifully crafted tale with broad appeal.

A gay â??Under the Tuscan Sun.’

A â??Rice Queen’s Bible.’

Please visit Richard Vohl’s YouTube Channel to view the Bangkok Boy Bar trailer.

Bangkok Boy Bar is the awaited book from Richard Vohl detailing his true life chronicle of romance and enlightenment set within the incomparable beauty of Thailand. Most of the pictures embedded within the story were taken by the author during the actual events.

Two introductory chapters provide a narrative background of his formative years growing up in the Midwest of the United States, and beginning his adult gay life in Los Angeles. These chapters lay the foundation for his first trip to Thailand and the life-changing encounters with beautiful and, oftentimes, benevolent Thai young men.

Many of the pivotal scenes in Thailand take place in the infamous gay boy bars in the Silom District of Bangkok, and the Sunee Plaza Neighborhood of Pattaya. He encounters a string of seductive Thai young men, their youthful splendor as alluring as sirens.

Within these tales, the numerous love scenes are more poetic and sensual than explicit (with notable exceptions).

The book is not a travel guide, yet seamlessly incorporated within the story are details about Thai culture, language and cuisine, gay resorts, neighborhoods and boy bars, and how not to fall out of a tuk tuk as it’s racing through the streets of Bangkok.

The book completes with the final chapter of his return to the U.S. after a life-threatening event in Thailand. We witness the repercussions of how his awakening begins to change his life and the loved ones around him in both subtle and profound ways.

From the author –

I hope you enjoy the book. Because it is a contemporary true story, I hope it is one to which many of you can relate, and if you wish, embark on a similar venture of your own.

So take my hand, let’s blow into this colored spinwheel, and lift off together to wherever it sends us â?¦



GAY: A short, true story of self discovery.

by BRENDON HARTWIG

The following is a true story.

A word of warning.

Please note it is sexually explicit and some of the content may offend. It is written for those with an adult, not easily offended open mind.

I have written it as a short story, shorter than a novella, not really knowing if there is a demand for more. If there is any sort of success, I will continue with a full length novel but at this moment in time this is a bit of a voyage of discovery for myself, testing the waters, so to speak, searching the market and the public’s desires.

For me, it is the tale of a beautiful memory, told as accurately as my recall will allow. It was when I was sexually naive, aged just eighteen, in the late 1970’s, a time before mobile phones or the internet. A time of discovery, in so many ways.



Obedience and Revolt:: Volume 1 – Learning to conform

by Daniel O’Beeve

This book represents volume one of a two-volume autobiographical novel by a practising doctor of clinical psychology. This is an ideal book for anybody who is interested in how childhood experiences affect adult development, and the possibilities of happy relationships. It should also be of interest to students and practitioners in the fields of developmental psychology; child care; attachment styles; family therapy; sociology of culturally deprived families; social mobility; plus autism and dissociation. And it can also be read as an engaging psychological thriller of the life of one young man who is trying to make sense of his life, and how to find love and romance.

Daniel O’Beeve wakes up to find he has been put together very badly by life. He is like a jumper, knitted from wool and string and wire and chain, with too many sleeves, and no neck hole. He’s a mess. But the challenge now is how to rewrite the story of his childhood and youth so that he can put himself back together in a saner, calmer, more socially and emotionally competent manner; so he can enjoy what is left of his life.



Mystery: Shadows of the Past (A Romantic Suspense): (Thriller Romance, Suspense, Mystery Romance, Suspense Romance)

by Maya Moss

Lauren Torres finds out that she was taken as a baby to be given to another family, the Torres. Her real name is Lauren Henderson, and her real parents live in Wyoming. She meets two ladies, Ms. Craft and Mrs. Thompson, who tell her about the Hendersons, and take her to their home.

While staying at her new home with the Hendersons, she goes to school and meets Mason Blair. At first, they can’t stand each other. However, slowly they become friends since they both get to play the lead roles in the school drama. After a while, they fall in love with each other.

Another student, John Parker, wants Lauren for himself. John tries to get Lauren, but Mason stops him before it goes too far. John comes up with a plan to kill Mason, and kidnap Lauren for a few days. But Lauren realizes the plan and calls for help. Two detectives, Lang and Richard, come in to help Lauren not to fall for her stalker’s plan, and try to catch John Parker in the criminal act. John hires a hit man named Mr. Husk to kill Mason, but he gets arrested after he shoots Mason and his father. Both Mason and his father wore protective gear on the day of the shooting, and survive. Mr. Husk makes a confession about John’s intentions and hands over recordings of his conversations with John.

John has his guardian, Mr. Wolf, go get Lauren from her home, and bring her to a warehouse. While at the warehouse, Mr. Wolf finds out that Lauren is the baby that he gave away to the Torres years ago. Lauren and Mr. Wolf become friends, and Mr. Wolf gives Lauren papers just in case something happens to him.

Mr. and Mrs. Henderson call the detectives to get Lauren back from John’s hands. They come up with a plan to get John and Mr. Wolf to the police station, and get a warrant to look in and around John’s property. Once that happens, Mr. Wolf goes back to hide, but eventually breaks down. He tells the detectives where to find Lauren, and the reasons why John did what he did. Mr. Wolf and John Parker are arrested, and soon the trial starts. During the trial, John’s lawyer is unable to prove his client’s innocence. Mr. Wolf has a heart attack on the witness stand and appears to die. During this time, Lauren and Mason’s relationship is on the rocks due to Mason’s greed for attention. The jury convicts John Parker of the crime, and he is sentenced to prison for life. Mr. Wolf faked his own death to watch Lauren from a distance.

Lauren and Mason move on with their life.



Mystery: The Dark: (Mystery, Suspense, Thriller, Suspense Thriller Mystery)

by Maya Moss

Emily is a final year criminology student at university whose life on campus is starting to get rough and rocky. She’s having reoccurring nightmares about the presence of spirits in the university library.

The mystery deepens when an unexpected package of criminology and necromancy books arrives at her dorm room door. The beautifully bound criminology books are a nice surprise, but the strange books on the spirit world and necromancy make Emily uneasy. Who sent this bizarre present? And what do they want with her?

On top of this, Emily has to deal with the mysterious disappearance of her roommate Grace, as well as strange occurrences at the university library. Thinking that all this can’t be a coincidence Emily joins forces with new friend Jamie and starts her own investigation around campus. Each person she talks to only serves to present more questions instead of answers. Where is Grace and why did she leave at the beginning of the semester? Are the rumors true about ghosts in the university library? Is there a connection between Emily’s strange dreams and the stack of necromancy books that were mysteriously delivered to her door? Who is the green-eyed woman in the library and what does she want?

A combination of mystery, dark fantasy and supernatural thriller, â??The Dark’ delves into the murky depths of the spirit world, exploring the strange and the just plain bizarre. When Emily’s previously normal life gets this dark, how will she ever find her way back to the light?



Fixed: Dope sacks, dye packs, and the long welcome back

by Doug Piotter

Fixed is a darkly comedic memoir that spans my unsupervised youth, drug and alcohol addiction, bank robbery, life in prison and ultimately my release and re-entry into my life’s new and sober orbit.

I grew up with alcoholic parents trapped inside their own lonely skins, a painful childhood full of cold shoulders and broken furniture. I burst onto the drug scene at age eleven and thrived before slowly finding out that it wasn’t all that it was cracked up to be. With addiction taking over and dictating my every move, I tried to make sense of it all while gathering five unwanted felonies along the way.

At thirty-three, after a long string of bank robberies and my bad guy impersonation had run its course, I was brought back to life with the gift of prison and given the opportunity to experience a new childhood that I could have only imagined while growing up in Manville. Upon release, I learned that the universe is a kind and forgiving place, often strange and funny with plenty for everyone as long as I don’t forget where I came from.



Character Building

by Booker T. Washington

From 1890-1915, the most influential black man in America was Booker T. Washington, who less than 35 years earlier had been born into slavery. The young boy worked laboriously until emancipation before going on to seek an education. By the time he was 40, he was consolidating a network of supporters that came to be known as the “Tuskegee Machine,” helping coordinate action with the support of black businesses, religious communities, and others. With his position of power, Washington spoke out against Jim Crow laws and Southern disfranchisement of blacks.

By the early 20th century, Washington’s tactics were questioned by other black leaders, notably W. E. B. Du Bois, who wanted to protest more vehemently in an effort to secure civil rights. Washington believed confrontation would only hurt the cause, and that cooperation and softer tones would wear down racism over time. To that end, both men wrote voluminously in support of their stances and thoughts. Washington wrote 14 books, including his renowned autobiography, Up From Slavery, which was published in 1901. Washington continues to be recognized for helping to improve the relationships between blacks and whites, as well as helping blacks get further access to education and civil rights. 



Up From Slavery: An Autobiography

by Booker T. Washington

From 1890-1915, the most influential black man in America was Booker T. Washington, who less than 35 years earlier had been born into slavery. The young boy worked laboriously until emancipation before going on to seek an education. By the time he was 40, he was consolidating a network of supporters that came to be known as the “Tuskegee Machine,” helping coordinate action with the support of black businesses, religious communities, and others. With his position of power, Washington spoke out against Jim Crow laws and Southern disfranchisement of blacks.

By the early 20th century, Washington’s tactics were questioned by other black leaders, notably W. E. B. Du Bois, who wanted to protest more vehemently in an effort to secure civil rights. Washington believed confrontation would only hurt the cause, and that cooperation and softer tones would wear down racism over time. To that end, both men wrote voluminously in support of their stances and thoughts. Washington wrote 14 books, including his renowned autobiography, Up From Slavery, which was published in 1901. Washington continues to be recognized for helping to improve the relationships between blacks and whites, as well as helping blacks get further access to education and civil rights. 



17 Sheikh Hamza Street, Cairo: A Middle Eastern Historical Fiction (Memories From Egypt)

by Avraham Bar-Av (Bentata)

The life of a Jewish family in Cairo is dramatically affected by the rise of Arab nationalism

A fascinating drama based on the biographic memoirs of the author, offering invaluable insight into Jewish history, North African Jewry and the history of the Middle East.

The Jewish Bentata family settles in Cairo, Egypt, at the beginning of the 20th century. After a few decades of leading a respectful bourgeois lifestyle suited for middle-class westerners in the Orient, the illusion of belonging begins to crack. As Rommel’s tanks bear down on the gates of Al Alamein, Arab nationalism raises its head.

In 1948, as the Israeli war of independence breaks out, the harassment reaches its peak: Hosni, a charming yet ruthless criminal, takes advantage of the family’s political weakness. He forces himself on Suzy, the youngest daughter, threatening to harm her family if she refuses him. When he discovers that she has betrayed him by marrying an English soldier and escaping to London, he turns to her older sister, Sophie. Hosni collects evidence about Sophie’s husband Zionist activity and threatens to hand it over to the authorities. While Henri is already arrested and sent to an internment camp in the desert, Sophie is given an offer that can’t be refused. She may either buy his incriminating documents one by one or buy the whole lot of them together. Hosni is not picky about the payment method: “Payment can take the form of money or gold or jewelry. If you’d rather not part with your belongings, an intimate encounter is also an option.”

The family’s life in Egypt has hit a dead end. In the face of catastrophe, family members hurry to flee from Egypt. One part of the family escapes to Israel, others spread out to find refuge in France, Italy and Australia.

Ë?Ë?Ë? A historical novel depicting the fall of a middle-class Jewish family in Egypt.

Through the life of the Bentata family, the reader is exposed to an unperceivable mixture of East and West that existed for a small historic moment, a vivid kaleidoscope of culture, heritage, color, scent, and flavor. Stage by stage we witness the historical realization of the prophecy given to Avraham, the patriarch of the Jewish nation: “thy seed shall be a stranger in a land that is not theirs and shall serve the people there who will afflict them… and afterward they will leave.”

Ë?Ë?Ë? An adventure story reveals the roots of the Israeli-Arab Conflict and the political situation in the Middle East.

A rare documentation of a surreal, rootless elite that managed to bloom in the fissure between a rotting, corrupt regime and the dying British Empire. Ignoring the domestic and regional shifts that spelled the end of Jewish existence in Egypt, they build their homes on the back of a dormant crocodile. As it woke up, the walls of existence began to crack.

Scroll up to grab a copy of 17 Sheikh Hamza Street today.



Through the Brazilian Wilderness

by Theodore Roosevelt

For a man who grew up to become the “Bull Moose”, Theodore Roosevelt was a sickly child, suffering from asthma and other maladies. But his physical weakness actually drove him to be more active, which also fostered an interest in nature. It also helped that Teddy’s family was wealthy, allowing him privileges including home school and the ability to attend Harvard, where he was an athlete and took an interest in naval affairs. After finishing at Harvard, Teddy entered politics, but it didn’t stop him from writing The Naval War of 1812 in 1882, establishing himself as a professional writer and historian.
 
In the 1890s, it was Teddy’s turn to make history, leading the Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War and being decorated for his service with a Medal of Honor. He parlayed his glory into the governorship of New York and then the Vice Presidency under William McKinley. When McKinley was assassinated in 1901, young Teddy was thrust into the presidency, one that would earn him a place on Mount Rushmore, Roosevelt’s “Square Deal” domestic policies favored average citizens while busting trusts and monopolies. Roosevelt also promoted conservation as an environmental stance, while his “speak softly and carry a big stick” foreign policy is still an oft used phrase today. Roosevelt even earned a Nobel Prize during his presidency. 
 
By the time Roosevelt died in 1919, he was an American icon. Today, Teddy is remembered for being an explorer, hunter, author, soldier, president, and safari adventurer, all of which combine into one unique reputation. 



Thoughts on African Colonization

by William Lloyd Garrison

Slavery existed long before the United States of America was founded, but so did opposition to slavery. Both flourished after the founding of the country, and the anti-slavery movement was known as abolition. For many abolitionists, slavery was the preeminent moral issue of the day, and their opposition to slavery was rooted in deeply held religious beliefs. Quakers formed a significant part of the abolitionist movement in colonial times, as did certain Founding Fathers like Benjamin Franklin. Many other prominent opponents of slavery based their opposition in Enlightenment ideals and natural law.

American abolitionists during the Constitutional Convention worked against the three-fifths compromise, and also attempted to get the Constitution to ban the Atlantic slave trade. Although the three-fifths compromise became a part of the Constitution, abolitionists managed to persuade the convention to allow Congress to ban the Atlantic slave trade after 1808. Other abolitionists tried to help slaves directly, by helping them escape to the North. After the Fugitive Slave Act mandated the return of escaped slaves, abolitionists helped escaped slaves travel to Canada.

In addition, many northern politicians opposed restricting slavery as either practically impossible or dangerous. In the years after the Atlantic slave trade was banned in 1808, abolitionists focused their political efforts on preventing the spread of slavery to the new territory of the Louisiana Purchase. Pro-slavery politicians likewise attempted to spread slavery to new states. Every time a new state formed from Louisiana territory was to enter the Union, intense political wrangling took place over whether the new state would be slave or free. The political wrangling often broke into violence.

By the middle of the 19th century, slavery had created a fevered pitch in the politics of the country, as abolitionists and slavery proponents fought a war of words and actual wars in Kansas and Nebraska. While the South postured for secession, abolitionists, both white and black, created a stronger movement in the Northeast in places like Boston. Ultimately the issue would have to be settled via civil war. 



Little White King

by Marguerite Steen

â??An exquisite piece of work. I do not remember anything written about cats that was as good as this’ – Compton Mackenzie

â??A book to charm cat lovers everywhere’ – Kirkus Reviews

The Little White King was the loveliest of Marguerite Steen’s long line of cats.

As an only child, animals had filled a larger part in her life than human beings. Growing up, she lived in a remote cottage, in the depth of Lakeland woods; squirrels, rabbits, moles, grass-snakes and field-mice were her companions.

She was surrounded by innumerable cats – she recalls â??a cloud of purr’ – and learned the subtleties of cat behaviour.

Above all, she learned to love them, and to respect cat character, with its many departures from the code human beings attempt to impose on them. Among other things, she learned that cats are capable of deep fidelity and ferocious courage.

But none of her many cats compared to her final, favourite Little White King.

The life of the Little White King was a brief one, but from the point of view of any cat lover – or indeed any lover of good writing – well worth recording.

Born stone deaf, but with beautiful snow-white fur, and love of human companionship, Steen soon took the place of his mother, protecting him and supporting him as he learnt to survive without the use of one of his senses.

Anyone who has owned and cared for a young cat will find much to remind them of the small being that contributed to the happiness and comfort of their home.

The record unfolds itself against the background of the matchless Berkshire countryside and the Georgian cottage to which Miss Steen has retreated from post-war London; the book is thus a picture of a most gifted writer’s country life as well as the biography of a little cat.

Praise for Marguerite Steen

â??Miss Steen is a superb manipulator of scene, and she makes her places as alive as her people’ – Daily Telegraph

â??Rich and enjoyable’ – The Observer

â??fine scenes and piquant portriats’ – The Sunday Times

â??a vivid narrative’ – Manchester Guardian

â??full of colour and character’ – John o’ London’s Weekly

â??rich, lavish, violent, passionate’ – Evening News

Marguerite Steen (12 May 1894 – 4 August 1975) was a British writer. Very much at home among creative people, she wrote biographies of the Terrys, of her friend Hugh Walpole, of the 18th century poet and actress (and sometime mistress to the Prince of Wales) Mary ‘Perdita’ Robinson, and of her own lover, the artist Sir William Nicholson. Her first major success was Matador (1934), for which she drew on her love of Spain, and of bullfighting. Also a best-seller on both sides of the Atlantic was her massive saga of the slave-trade and Bristol shipping, The Sun Is My Undoing (1941). She was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 1951. Her two volumes of autobiography, Looking Glass (1966) and Pier Glass (1968) offer some delightful views of the English creative set from the 1920s to the 1950s.

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Anneewakee: One Boy’s Journey

by Steve Salem Evans

This is the true story of one boy’s journey through Anneewakee Boys’ Wilderness Camp.

Anneewakee opened in 1962 as a treatment center for troubled boys and was essentially shut down in the late 80’s amidst allegations of physical and sexual abuse.

There are many traumatized to this day by what they endured at the treatment center and those who credit it with saving their lives. The stories run the gamut, from outright tortuous conditions to those who remember it as a happy place, a place filled with fond memories and lasting friendships.

This is Steve’s story and his story falls somewhere in the middle. Ordered to Anneewakee by a judge who was sick of seeing the fifteen year old in his courtroom and, on his thirteenth visit in front of the judge, was ordered to Anneewakee and was there over two years.

This is his story. Everyone who was there has a different story but this story belongs to Steve.



The Woman’s Bible

by Elizabeth Cady Stanton

“The moment we begin to fear the opinions of others and hesitate to tell the truth that is in us, and from motives of policy are silent when we should speak, the divine floods of light and life no longer flow into our souls.” – Elizabeth Cady Stanton 

Elizabeth Cady Stanton is something of an unsung hero in the history of the feminist movement. Though she is still primarily known as an advocate of women’s suffrage and is closely linked to the better known Susan B. Anthony, Stanton was shunned by many of her fellow suffragists because her ideas seem too radical and because many were disturbed by her barely Deist view of religion. Over a century after her death, modern feminists tend to overlook Stanton in favor of Anthony, while remembering that Stanton enjoyed taking on the traditional 19th century gender roles of being the mother of a large family and remaining devoted to her husband throughout her life. And while Anthony’s comments about abortion are still fiercely debated by pro-life and pro-choice crowds, Stanton held conservative views toward abortion. It’s clear that Elizabeth Cady Stanton was very much her own woman, certainly a fitting description that she would not have wanted any other way. 

Though she is not as well known or fondly remembered as her closest counterpart, Stanton preceded Anthony as an advocate of women’s rights. It was Stanton who issued the Declaration of Sentiments at the first women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848, touching off the organized movement that worked toward suffrage and equality. At the same time, Stanton was an ardent abolitionist, and she focused on progressive issues like custody rights, divorce, women’s property rights, employment issues, and even birth control. 



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