Free biographies and memoirs Kindle books for 15 Dec 15

IT’S NOT YOUR FAULT!: True Stories of Abused Women

by William H. Joiner Jr.

“The first time he hit me we were at a dance. I was talking to another guy at the bar. Benny came up behind me, turned me around, and slammed a beer bottle into my face.” â??Mary

“When I found out I was pregnant, I thought we would be a big happy family. That all ended when he got drunk and kicked me in the stomach. I miscarried.” â??Martha

“He went on to tell me ‘if you ever tell anyone our secret, I will tell them that you are the one who asked for this.’ Naturally, only being nine years old, I had no idea what he really meant, but I will never forget what happened next.” â??Paula

“Upon moving to our new home there were new rules. I was allowed no car and no phone, as before. But now I was also not allowed shoes so I could not run away. If I did everything right and didn’t make him angry, he would allow me to buy food.” â??Ashley

When William Joiner was asked to write the true story of an abused woman, he put out a call for the personal experiences of other women who had suffered abuse. Stunned by the vast, gut-wrenching responses, he vowed to write this broader account of their stories, in order to give hope, courage and resources to women in need.

90% of the net profits from this book will be donated to organizations which help abused women.



Cutting The Bars – Volume Two: A hard place for hard men

by Peter Egge

I am not politically correct in my attitude, and that is clearly reflected in my writing.

I do not intentionally wish to offend any person whosoever, however I will not be

apologising if I do.

I will not be dictated to by the “thought Police” as to what I can say and what I can’t

say.

To be quite blunt, I am too old for that nonsense and I firmly believe in free speech,

meaning I am free to say what I like with some minor provisos. My father fought in

the Second World War so I could do so, and I do not relinquish my right to say what I

want in my own words.

If you are afraid my writings may offend you, I strongly suggest you do not read any

of my “true stories” with “real names” in “real Gaols” based on the New South Wales

prison system, mainly in the 1970’s and1980’s. It may be your loss.



General Edward Porter Alexander at Second Manassas: Account of the Battle from His Memoirs

by Edward Porter Alexander

In the narrative of the Civil War, Edward Porter Alexander has loomed larger in death than in life. Just 25 years old when the war broke out, Porter Alexander had already served as an engineer and officer in the U.S. Army, but the native Georgian resigned his commission in May 1861 and joined the Confederacy after his home state seceded. 

Porter Alexander would continue to serve under Longstreet’s corps for most of the rest of the war, and he famously suggested to Lee at Appomattox that the Confederate army should disband and melt away instead of surrender. Porter Alexander would later regret the suggestion, and Lee scolded him for it anyway. 

Though he had served with distinction during the Civil War, it was Porter Alexander’s memoirs that have kept his name alive today. While many prominent officers on both sides wrote memoirs, Porter Alexander’s were among the most insightful and often considered by historians as the most evenhanded. With a sense of humor and a good narrative, Porter Alexander skillfully narrated the war, his service, and what he considered the successes and faults of others, including Lee, when he thought they had made good decisions or mistakes. As a result, historians continue to rely heavily on his memoirs as a source for Civil War history. 



Tom and Heather, Book One Chapter 8: A True-Life Modern Love Story Reborne of Lust, Passion and…Mischievous Adventure (Tom and Heather, A Trilogy 2)

by Morgan Snow

Is sex essential? Is it truly, deeply important in a loving relationship? Of course it is!

The real-life “Tom and Heather Wellesley” were a once-highly-attractive couple who by five years ago had found themselves in a slightly boring, out of shape “family rut.” Now in their thirties, their intimacy and excitement had gradually waned, opening the door for, among other pitfalls, the possibility of divorce.

However in divorce’s face they fashioned, by mounting degrees, a culture of their own, not knowing in the beginning that hotwifing was already an established worldwide phenomenon.

This phenomenon included couples not only in their and position context, but also those who lived countless other lives, wildly varied (re philosophies and motives) – culturally as well as intellectually – from Tom and Heather’s – across the incredibly widespread canvas of the hotwifing landscape.

At the outset of their ventures forth, Heather faced a serious learning curve as her seduction techniques met, ironically, with alternating degrees of bemused and bemusing success. And ironic non-success.

Meanwhile on the plus side, Tom’s love life with Heather began to percolate dramatically, as it did for the real-life couple upon whose story this rowdy, raunchy, sensuous-and-sensual tale is fondly and warmly based – and with whose input and approval it was written. With grander, more intimate and more intriguing successes for Heather – with and, occasionally, without Tom – to follow. And follow…!…in Book Two, Chapter 9!

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

NOTES: 12/12/15

Dear Friends and Fans of the real “Tom,” and the real “Heather:”

Until Chapter Two of Book Two, the price for every new chapter had been $.99, which we felt fair. But KDP began displaying alerts that (for whatever reason) selections in our genre will reach a far broader audience if the price is $2.99; if you log onto the KDP/Amazon Advertising and Promotions site, you will find similar advisements. Therefore, we are honoring this guidance from them, and we hope that the results will be positive for everyone. However we do this with some reservation, and we apologize sincerely to those for whom, like us, the added $2 cost might be not insignificant – although hopefully not burdensome. To ease the pain, we are still…as before…offering each chapter as an Amazon Free Promotion for the Friday through Wednesday during which each new chapter appears.

For you most-welcome new readers, regarding “the chapters:” every Thursday a new chapter of “Tom and Heather, Book Two” will appear for $2.99…a bit the way Charles Dickens placed a new chapter of his novels in magazines on a weekly basis.

If you missed Book One and would like to read more of the backstory (and some choice bits from Book Three), the complete Book One is available here on Amazon for $9.99. Simply do whatever works for you – hopefully with an open mind, and an appreciation for the real Tom and Heather’s remarkable – sometime amusing, sometimes touching, sometimes frustrating, sometimes sizzling – journey.

Best, and enjoy!

With sincere appreciation,

Morgan Snow

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

BTW Book Two in its entirety for $9.99 is still not available as, although it is complete now in first draft form, it needs additional editing by yours truly, which I try to perform each week. Wish I didn’t have a “day job” so I could spend full-time writing and editing, but, alas…guessing you might relate. And even in its second-draft form, Book ONE could use some work – not a surprise if you’ve been following the literary adventure as well as “Tom and Heather”‘s literal one. Perhaps one day we’ll have a professional publisher who can contribute needed finessing, as occurred with 50 SHADES when it went to hardbound-then-paperback.

* SIGH * with a smile!

MS



General Edward Porter Alexander at First Bull Run: Account of the Battle from His Memoirs

by Edward Porter Alexander

In the narrative of the Civil War, Edward Porter Alexander has loomed larger in death than in life. Just 25 years old when the war broke out, Porter Alexander had already served as an engineer and officer in the U.S. Army, but the native Georgian resigned his commission in May 1861 and joined the Confederacy after his home state seceded. 

Porter Alexander would continue to serve under Longstreet’s corps for most of the rest of the war, and he famously suggested to Lee at Appomattox that the Confederate army should disband and melt away instead of surrender. Porter Alexander would later regret the suggestion, and Lee scolded him for it anyway. 

Though he had served with distinction during the Civil War, it was Porter Alexander’s memoirs that have kept his name alive today. While many prominent officers on both sides wrote memoirs, Porter Alexander’s were among the most insightful and often considered by historians as the most evenhanded. With a sense of humor and a good narrative, Porter Alexander skillfully narrated the war, his service, and what he considered the successes and faults of others, including Lee, when he thought they had made good decisions or mistakes. As a result, historians continue to rely heavily on his memoirs as a source for Civil War history. 



Silent Outrage: Inside a Rape Survivor’s World

by Olivia Emisar

“This book is about all of us; the victims and the public. A long overdue discussion that encompasses old stories that have made their way into current events and old stories that have long been forgotten in an effort to move forward and forget the unpleasantness in our lives.” -This books will give the uninformed a better understanding of how to talk to rape victims and survivors and why rape is not the isolated incident the news media makes us believe. It highlights how predators operate and how easily they blend with society. These are the thoughts and experiences of a victim that learned to be a survivor. The title “Silent Outrage” is in response to the re-victimization of rape victims and survivors by stereotypes and the constant internal struggle that has become a part of our daily lives.



The Orange Blossom Express

by Marlena Evangeline

Love and peace get complicated.

A marijuana smuggler and the woman who loves him survive the dynamics of life in 1969.

A journey from the innocence of the hippie life of the flower children to the harsher experience of the realities of drug smuggling, this story the traces the journey of a group of young people that survive the Age of Aquarius.



Star Wars For Beginners: All You Should Know Before Watching a New Episode The Force Awakens

by Mike Mitchell

Star Wars For Beginners: All You Should Know Before Watching a New Episode “The Force Awakens”



General Edward Porter Alexander at Chancellorsville: Account of the Battle from His Memoirs

by Edward Porter Alexander

In the narrative of the Civil War, Edward Porter Alexander has loomed larger in death than in life. Just 25 years old when the war broke out, Porter Alexander had already served as an engineer and officer in the U.S. Army, but the native Georgian resigned his commission in May 1861 and joined the Confederacy after his home state seceded. 

Porter Alexander would continue to serve under Longstreet’s corps for most of the rest of the war, and he famously suggested to Lee at Appomattox that the Confederate army should disband and melt away instead of surrender. Porter Alexander would later regret the suggestion, and Lee scolded him for it anyway. 

Though he had served with distinction during the Civil War, it was Porter Alexander’s memoirs that have kept his name alive today. While many prominent officers on both sides wrote memoirs, Porter Alexander’s were among the most insightful and often considered by historians as the most evenhanded. With a sense of humor and a good narrative, Porter Alexander skillfully narrated the war, his service, and what he considered the successes and faults of others, including Lee, when he thought they had made good decisions or mistakes. As a result, historians continue to rely heavily on his memoirs as a source for Civil War history. 



General Edward Porter Alexander at Fredericksburg: Letters to the Southern Historical Society

by Edward Porter Alexander

In the narrative of the Civil War, Edward Porter Alexander has loomed larger in death than in life. Just 25 years old when the war broke out, Porter Alexander had already served as an engineer and officer in the U.S. Army, but the native Georgian resigned his commission in May 1861 and joined the Confederacy after his home state seceded. 

Porter Alexander would continue to serve under Longstreet’s corps for most of the rest of the war, and he famously suggested to Lee at Appomattox that the Confederate army should disband and melt away instead of surrender. Porter Alexander would later regret the suggestion, and Lee scolded him for it anyway. 

Though he had served with distinction during the Civil War, it was Porter Alexander’s memoirs that have kept his name alive today. While many prominent officers on both sides wrote memoirs, Porter Alexander’s were among the most insightful and often considered by historians as the most evenhanded. With a sense of humor and a good narrative, Porter Alexander skillfully narrated the war, his service, and what he considered the successes and faults of others, including Lee, when he thought they had made good decisions or mistakes. As a result, historians continue to rely heavily on his memoirs as a source for Civil War history. 

Before he even wrote his memoirs, he wrote letters that were published in the Southern Historical Society, which kept a literary journal that helped develop the “Lost Cause” and became the clearinghouse for many Confederate writers after the war. In this letter, Porter Alexander narrates his account of the Battle of Petersburg. 



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