Free historical fiction Kindle books for 15 Dec 15

Betty Zane

by Zane Grey

Zane Grey (1872 – 1939) was an American author best known for writing Western novels, with his most famous being Riders of the Purple Sage. That work is widely considered the greatest Western ever written, and Grey remains one of the most famous authors of the genre. Grey also wrote many other novels on fishing and baseball.



Wildfire

by Zane Grey

Zane Grey (1872 – 1939) was an American author best known for writing Western novels, with his most famous being Riders of the Purple Sage. That work is widely considered the greatest Western ever written, and Grey remains one of the most famous authors of the genre. Grey also wrote many other novels on fishing and baseball.



The Mysterious Rider

by Zane Grey

Zane Grey (1872 – 1939) was an American author best known for writing Western novels, with his most famous being Riders of the Purple Sage. That work is widely considered the greatest Western ever written, and Grey remains one of the most famous authors of the genre. Grey also wrote many other novels on fishing and baseball.



The Mysterious Key and What it Opened

by Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott (1832 – 1888) needs little introduction, as she is one of the most famous American female authors, whose most famous work is Little Women.  She also served as a nurse for six weeks during the Civil War at Union Hospital in Georgetown, and her letters were compiled to create Hospital Sketches.



Greenmantle

by John Buchan

John Buchan was a Scottish author and Unionist politician who served as Governor General of Canada.  Greenmantle continues to follow the adventures of Richard Hannay, an expatriate Scot who was first introduced in the classic novel The Thirty-Nine Steps.



Romance: Mail Order Bride: A Mail Order Bride Christmas (Historical Fiction Romance) (Mail Order Brides) (Western Historical Romance) (Victorian Romance) … Victorian Mail Order Bride Romance)

by Jessica Wolf

**6 Free BONUS Clean Romance Books Included!**

**A Standalone Novel with No Cliffhangers!**

A Historical Western Victorian Mail Order Bride Romance

Jessie lived with her family on their homestead and had helped the family build a successful farm raising crops and animals. Her greatest joy and passion was for training her young mare and galloping across the plains. To her shock and dismay her family agrees to an arranged marriage with a wealthy family who traveled from back east to do business in their town.

Neither Jessie, nor her intended husband, want this union but as she considers the situation they are both in, she realizes that their circumstances could be worse. James is being forced to marry or be disowned from the family business and all the wealth that comes from his name. He also knows that if he intends to be happy as a married man he has to win her over and does his best to make her more comfortable with her new path in life.

They go through with the lavish celebration that is more for their families than for the couple and soon they are bound in matrimony to try and make a life together while leading the family business in the remote prairie town.

Limited Time Only! Get This Book Before The Promotion Runs Out!

You Do NOT Need a Kindle Device to Read This E-Book, You Can Read On Your PC, Mac, Smart Phone, And Or Your Kindle Device

WARNING: Adults 18+ Only. Contains Sexually Explicit Content! Please Make Sure This E-book Is Stored Somewhere That It Cannot Be Accessed By Under Age 18 Readers. THIS E-BOOK IS FOR SALE TO ADULTS 18+ ONLY!



Tappan’s Burro and Other Stories

by Zane Grey

Zane Grey (1872 – 1939) was an American author best known for writing Western novels, with his most famous being Riders of the Purple Sage. That work is widely considered the greatest Western ever written, and Grey remains one of the most famous authors of the genre. Grey also wrote many other novels on fishing and baseball.



The Young Pitcher

by Zane Grey

Zane Grey (1872 – 1939) was an American author best known for writing Western novels, with his most famous being Riders of the Purple Sage. That work is widely considered the greatest Western ever written, and Grey remains one of the most famous authors of the genre. Grey also wrote many other novels on fishing and baseball.



Windsor Castle

by William Harrison Ainsworth

William Harrison Ainsworth was an English novelist best known for historical fiction.  After training to become a lawyer, Ainsworth turned to writing instead and had a long and successful career.



The King of Clubs and the Queen of Hearts

by Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott (1832 – 1888) needs little introduction, as she is one of the most famous American female authors, whose most famous work is Little Women.  She also served as a nurse for six weeks during the Civil War at Union Hospital in Georgetown, and her letters were compiled to create Hospital Sketches.



Anna of the Five Towns

by Arnold Bennett

Arnold Bennett was a prolific British writer who penned dozens of works across all genres, from adventurous fiction to propaganda and nonfiction. He wrote plays like Judith and historical novels like Tales of the Five Towns.



Trailin’!

by Max Brand

Max Brand was the pen name of American author Frederick Schiller Faust.  Brand was best known for writing Western novels, and many films have been adapted based on his stories.



Buried Alive

by Arnold Bennett

Arnold Bennett was a prolific British writer who penned dozens of works across all genres, from adventurous fiction to propaganda and nonfiction. He wrote plays like Judith and historical novels like Tales of the Five Towns.



Tales of the Five Towns

by Arnold Bennett

Arnold Bennett was a prolific British writer who penned dozens of works across all genres, from adventurous fiction to propaganda and nonfiction. He wrote plays like Judith and historical novels like Tales of the Five Towns.



Rookwood

by William Harrison Ainsworth

William Harrison Ainsworth was an English novelist best known for historical fiction.  After training to become a lawyer, Ainsworth turned to writing instead and had a long and successful career.



The Mississippi Bubble

by Emerson Hough

Emerson Hough was a late 19th century American writer best known for Westerns and historical novels about America. The Mississippi Bubble was a best-seller in 1902 and remains his most famous work.



The Downfall

by Emile Zola

Ã?mile Zola is one of the greatest writers of the 19th century, and one of France’s best known citizens. In his life, Zola was the most important exemplar of the literary school of naturalism and a major figure in the political liberalization of France. Around the end of his life, Zola was instrumental in helping secure the exoneration of the falsely accused and convicted army officer Alfred Dreyfus, a victim of anti-Semitism. The Dreyfus Affair was encapsulated in the renowned newspaper headline J’Accuse.

More than half of Zola’s novels were part of this set of 20 collectively known as Les Rougon-Macquart. Unlike Honore de Balzac, who compiled his works into La Comedie Humaine midway through, Zola mapped out a complete layout of his series. Set in France’s Second Empire, the series traces the “environmental” influences of violence, alcohol and prostitution which became more prevalent during the second wave of the Industrial Revolution. The series examines two branches of a family: the respectable Rougons and the disreputable Macquarts for five generations. Zola explained, “I want to portray, at the outset of a century of liberty and truth, a family that cannot restrain itself in its rush to possess all the good things that progress is making available and is derailed by its own momentum, the fatal convulsions that accompany the birth of a new world.” 



A Lost Lady of Old Years

by John Buchan

John Buchan was a Scottish author and Unionist politician who served as Governor General of Canada. He wrote a series of books that follow the adventures of Richard Hannay, an expatriate Scot who was first introduced in the classic novel The Thirty-Nine Steps.



A Niece of Snapshot Harry’s

by Bret Harte

America has always had a fascination with the Wild West, and schoolchildren grow up learning about famous Westerners like Wyatt Earp, Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill Hicock, as well as the infamous shootout at O.K. Corral. Pioneering and cowboys and Indians have been just as popular in Hollywood, with Westerners helping turn John Wayne and Clint Eastwood into legends on the silver screen. HBO’s Deadwood, about the historical 19th century mining town on the frontier was popular last decade.

Not surprisingly, a lot has been written about the West, and one of the best known writers about the West in the 19th century was Francis Bret Harte (1836-1902), who wrote poetry and short stories during his literary career. Harte was on the West Coast by the 1860s, placing himself in perfect position to document and depict frontier life. 



The Secret Place

by Molly Noble Bull

Previously published under the title Sanctuary

The Secret Place, an award winning historical Christian novel by Molly Noble Bull, begins in France in 1740 with the murder of Rachel Levin’s sweetheart as well as her parents. Rachel flees her French village with her late sweetheart’s brother, Pierre Dupreâ??a Huguenot, and they take refuge in a church until the military captain responsible for the deaths arrives. The captain wants Rachel as his mistress or he wants her dead. Rachel and Pierre agree to a marriage of convenience and manage to escape. Will they reach Scotland as planned? Or will their lives end on an English countryside?

The Secret Place, under the title Sanctuary, won the 2008 Gayle Wilson Award in the inspirational category and tied for first place in a second national contest for published authors that year.

Published in conjunction with Hartline Literary Agency.



Sacred and Profane Love

by Arnold Bennett

Arnold Bennett was a prolific British writer who penned dozens of works across all genres, from adventurous fiction to propaganda and nonfiction. He wrote plays like Judith and historical novels like Tales of the Five Towns.



The Trial of Lewis Thornton Powell – The Lincoln Assassination Conspiracy: (aka Payne, Powell, Wood, Mosby, Doc and Mystery Man) (150th Anniversary Series of the Lincoln Assassination Book 3)

by Sean E. Jacobs

BOOK 3 in the 150th Anniversary Series of the Lincoln Assassination: Reporters are denied access to Lewis Thornton Powell, one of the conspirators in the Lincoln Assassination while held captive on the USS Montauk with David Herold in the same down-below chambers of the vessel. Reporters are held at bay, but not so for Alexander Gardner, a favorite photographer of the government in Washington City at the time.

On April 27th, Gardner is busy taking photographs of those who had been arrested in the government’s dragnet. Say one derogatory word against the government or talk bad about Lincoln, and one could land in the slammer with three hundred others.

Each of the prisoners are brought on deck and photographed in a few different positions. When the dust clears, far more photographs are taken of Lewis Thornton Powell than anyone else. Powell was a camera hound and gave his time to the celebrated photographer. Powell cooperated with Gardner’s requests and posed sitting down, standing, with and without restraints, and modeling the overcoat and hat he wore the night of the Secretary of State Seward’s attacks. The one used in most discussions is where he stands against the gun turret of the USS Saugus, staring right at the camera, relaxing with a calm demeanor.

Powell is shackled with a form of manacles known as “lily irons”, riveted handcuffs with two separate iron bands on each of his wrists preventing him the ability to bend his wrist or use either of his hands. Like most of the male prisoners on board, he drug around with him a heavy iron ball at the end of a six foot long chain manacled to one of his legs.

In The Lincoln Assassination – The Trial of Lewis Thornton Powell, a military tribunal, rather than a civilian court, is chosen as the prosecutorial venue. The government officials at the time think the Commission might be more lenient in regards to the evidence allowing the court to get to the bottom of what they perceive as a vast conspiracy.

Conviction requires a simple majority of the judges, while imposition of the death sentence requires a two -thirds majority. The only appeal available to the prisoners is to go directly to the President of the United States.

From all indication, enough preliminary witnesses have placed Powell in the same room with Secretary of State Seward. Finding legal counsel is difficult, and after three days waiting, Powell is finally able to locate representation for the trial that begins on May 12, 1865. William E. Doster takes over representation for the defense of Lewis Powell. Doster was a graduate of Yale and Harvard. He was the former provost marshal for the District of Columbia.

William Doster for the Defense opened his case on June 21st, 1865 for Lewis Thornton Powell. The weight of the evidence against Powell is so overwhelming, the Defense, instead of trying to disprove his guilt, characterizes Powell’s actions as those of a soldier who aimed at the Secretary of State instead of the lesser corps of the Union.

This court case in its entirety for Lewis Thornton Powell is brought to paper for the reader to determine from the evidence and the testimony of witnesses rather or not Lewis Powell should be hanged or be turned free.

In an effort to demonstrate a full testimony, repetitive witnesses might bog down the reader at times, but, on the other hand, will give insight to how many different witnesses testified to the same events.

BEEBOP PUBLISHING SCHEDULED RELEASE DATE FOR THIS NOVEL IS AUGUST 31, 2015.



A DANCE CALLED AFRICA (THE ‘JOHN ROSS’TRILOGY Book 1)

by Isabella Bleszynski

Kings and queens, witches and warriors,

Renegades, mystics, adventurers, wise men and fools

All play their part in â??A DANCE CALLED AFRICA’

When the ancient powers of Africa meet the thrusting forces of change, what will be the outcome?

1798. Zululand

Threatened by a group of thugs, a 10-year old boy appeals to his ancestors for help. The response is immediate – and terrifying. Years later, after publicly defying the powerful father who forced his family into exile – again the heavens respond.

Coincidence, natural phenomenaâ?¦or something else?

One person, however, shows no fear- either of the storm or its apparent instigator. Langani, the four-year old who likes to dance, meets the rebellious youth, Shaka ka Senzangakhona.

During the trial of a notorious witch, they meet again. Shaka is now a powerful warrior king and creator of the Zulu kingdom, while Langani has become a mystical prophet and a man of peace.

The sinister world of the occult is always close. Both Shaka and Langani oppose it- although they sometimes use it for their own ends.

The diviner is haunted by dreams of the white men who are scheming to enter the Kingdom in search of its ivory, and fears what will follow in their wake.

Henry Francis Fynn: hunter and intrepid explorer, he is also known as â??the man who can raise the dead.’

James King and Francis Farewell, ex-naval officers. whose bitter rivalry will threaten to bring destruction on those around them.

Jakot Msimbithi: the handsome Xhosa with the â??magical eye’ and the luck of the devil. Cattle rustler, spy, and freedom fighter – even Robben Island cannot hold him.

But there is something else Langani cannot explain – his electrifying visions of the blue-eyed, red-haired boy who is also destined to play a part in the dangerous game about to unfold in Zululand.

Who is he? And just what is his powerful connection to King Shaka?

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Lone Jack Kid: The Return: A Western Adventure (Western Fiction, by Joe Corso Book 2) (The Lone Jack Kid)

by Joe Corso

Charles Longstreet’s Broadway show ended after a year’s run and he wanted to give the actress something to remember him by. After receiving his gift the famous actress looked at her friend. “You know, Olga, some men have greatness thrust upon them and Charles Longstreet, even though he is not aware of it, is one of them.”

Charlie is bushwhacked on the trail by three hombres who after shooting him leave him for dead. Upon recovering he follows the old abandoned Butterfield Overland Stage Route where Charlie tracks the men to El Paso.

Cora who almost got Charlie killed with her curiosity stood on the wooden sidewalk in front of her store. He passed her as if she wasn’t there. Because of her immaturity she might have lost the man she always dreamed of meeting. Now it was too late to do anything but wave as he passed slowly by and think of what could have been.

Ned blew smoke from the barrel of his gun, then turned to the bartender. “He’s the Lone Jack Kid, and if these jerks would have left us alone, they’d still be alive now.”

Why is a wounded indian riding with Charles Longstreet, and why is Charlie wearing a marshal’s badge? And why does President Grant order him to the White House? These tantalizing questions are answered as the reader follows the Lone Jack Kid in his latest adventure when he rides the trail west to California.



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