Free history Kindle books for 16 Dec 15

Orange Berets: Adventures and Misadventures in the Sinai

by James Crabtree

The Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) came about as a result of the Camp David accords. This peacekeeping force (NOT under the auspices of the United Nations) keeps the peace by means of three infantry battalions (one Fijian, one Colombian, one U.S. Army), a Civilian Observation Unit and military men and women from several other countries.

Maj. Crabtree, the Press and Visits Officer, served there in 2007 and saw the rise Hamas in Gaza, the mysterious crash of the MFO’s Twin Otter, and the lack of popularity of then-President Hosni Mubarak. He provides background information on the history of the region and insights into how things work (or don’t work) in Egypt.

Crabtree’s writing has a biting style and it is supplemented by cartoons drawn by his “acid pen” and photos taken by the author. His take on the Army, the MFO and the absurdity of life in general makes this a must-read.



Help Heavenward

by Octavius Winslow

Octavius Winslow was a Baptist minister in the 19th century who wrote a series of devotionals that were popular among Christians of all denominations.



Unexplained Mysteries: Unsolved Mysteries Book

by Mysteries

Mysteries book



Soul Heights and Soul Depths

by Octavius Winslow

Octavius Winslow was a Baptist minister in the 19th century who wrote a series of devotionals that were popular among Christians of all denominations.



John Calvin’s Treatise on Relics

by John Calvin

John Calvin (10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was one of the most influential Christians of the last millennium. An influential French theologian and pastor during the Protestant Reformation, Calvin was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later named after him. Originally trained as a humanist lawyer, he broke from the Roman Catholic Church around 1530, and after religious tensions provoked a violent uprising against Protestants in France, Calvin fled to Basel, Switzerland, where he published the first edition of his seminal work Institutes of the Christian Religion in 1536.

Calvin was a tireless polemic and apologetic writer who generated much controversy. He also exchanged cordial and supportive letters with many reformers, including Philipp Melanchthon and Heinrich Bullinger. In addition to the Institutes, he wrote commentaries on most books of the Bible, as well as theological treatises and confessional documents. He regularly preached sermons throughout the week in Geneva. Calvin was influenced by the Augustinian tradition, which led him to expound the doctrine of predestination and the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation.

Calvin’s writing and preachings provided the seeds for the branch of theology that bears his name. The Reformed and Presbyterian churches, which look to Calvin as a chief expositor of their beliefs, have spread throughout the world. 



The Resurrection of the Dead, and Eternal Judgment

by John Bunyan

John Bunyan (1628-1688) was an English Christian writer and preacher, famous for writing Pilgrim’s Progress. Though he was a Reformed Baptist, in the Church of England he is remembered with a Lesser Festival on August 30, and on the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church (USA) on August 29.

Bunyan wrote The Pilgrim’s Progress in two parts, the first of which was published in London in 1678 and the second in 1684. He began the work in his first period of imprisonment, and probably finished it during the second. The earliest edition in which the two parts combined in one volume came in 1728. A third part falsely attributed to Bunyan appeared in 1693, and was reprinted as late as 1852. Its full title is The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come.

The Pilgrim’s Progress is arguably one of the most widely known allegories ever written, and has been extensively translated. Protestant missionaries commonly translated it as the first thing after the Bible. At one time, The Pilgrim’s Progress was considered the most widely read and translated book in the English language apart from the Bible.



The Lord From Heaven

by Sir Robert Anderson

Sir Robert Anderson was an Assistant Commissioner of the London Metropolitan police, as well as a theologian and writer.  Anderson’s best known works include The Coming Prince and The Silence of God.



The Book of Jasher

by Anonymous

The Book of Jasher is notorious for being a potentially lost book of the Bible that was mentioned in Samuel. Since then, it has been purported to be found and often labeled a fraud.



Peace

by Aristophanes

Aristophanes was one of the Ancient Greeks’ most famous playwrights, and some of his works survived to the modern day, including this one.



The Frogs

by Aristophanes

Aristophanes was one of the Ancient Greeks’ most famous playwrights, and some of his works survived to the modern day, including this one.



The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism

by Max Weber

Karl Emil Maximilian “Max” Weber (21 April 1864 – 14 June 1920) was a German sociologist and political economist who profoundly influenced social theory, social research and the discipline of sociology itself. A key proponent of methodological antipositivism, which presents sociology as a non-empiricist field which must study social action through interpretive means based upon understanding the meaning and purpose that individuals attach to their own actions, Weber is often cited, with Ã?mile Durkheim and Karl Marx, as one of the three principal architects of modern social science. 
 
Weber was also highly influential with his thesis in economic sociology, elaborated in his book The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, that ascetic Protestantism was one of the major “elective affinities” associated with the rise of capitalism, bureaucracy and the rational-legal nation-state in the Western world. Against Marx’s “historical materialism,” Weber emphasised the importance, for understanding the development of capitalism, of cultural influences embedded in religion.  
 
The Protestant Ethic formed the earliest part in Weber’s broader investigation into the sociology of religion. Begun as a series of essays, the original German text was composed in 1904.It is considered a founding text in economic sociology and sociology in general.



Confederate Military History: The Bull Run or Manassas Campaign

by Clement A. Evans

Confederate Military History is a 12-volume series of books written and/or edited by former Confederate general Clement A. Evans that deals with specific topics related to the military personalities, places, battles, and campaigns in various Southern United States, including those of the Confederacy.

Written with a heavy Southern slant, the articles that comprise the compendium deal with the famous events of the war. This account is of the Battle of First Manassas or First Bull Run, fought on July 21, 1861. The battle, a decisive Confederate victory, was the first major battle of the Civil War and was the first time in history that troops rode a train to the battlefield to participate on the same day. 



On Light and Other High Frequency Phenomena

by Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla was one of history’s greatest scientists, and though he is best known for his pioneering work with electricity, the fact that he is mostly remembered solely for that actually does a disservice to his legacy. Born a Serb in the Austrian Empire, Tesla came to the United States and worked in a laboratory for none other than the Wizard of Menlo Park, Thomas Edison.

It was through his work on behalf of Edison that Tesla flourished and became a well-known figure in his own right. His work there helped him establish financial backing for his own projects, particularly the design of AC (alternating current) as a system for supplying electricity. This later put him at odds with Edison, who championed DC (direct current), but Tesla’s model would come out on top as the 19th century came to a close. 

Having established AC as an electrical supply system, Tesla became a global celebrity, and his devices and inventions fascinated people. Tesla tinkered with everything from X-rays to wireless communications and even attempted a primitive form of the radio. While Tesla was not able to successfully execute the devices and concepts he foresaw, his forward thinking in fields like wireless communication certainly proved prescient, and his futuristic devices and his later reputation for eccentricity helped create the “mad scientist” image that still remains a pop culture fixture. Tesla seemed to have come to grips with this aspect of his legacy late in life, noting, “The scientific man does not aim at an immediate result. He does not expect that his advanced ideas will be readily taken up. His work is like that of the planter â?? for the future. His duty is to lay the foundation for those who are to come, and point the way.”



The True Wireless

by Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla was one of history’s greatest scientists, and though he is best known for his pioneering work with electricity, the fact that he is mostly remembered solely for that actually does a disservice to his legacy. Born a Serb in the Austrian Empire, Tesla came to the United States and worked in a laboratory for none other than the Wizard of Menlo Park, Thomas Edison.

It was through his work on behalf of Edison that Tesla flourished and became a well-known figure in his own right. His work there helped him establish financial backing for his own projects, particularly the design of AC (alternating current) as a system for supplying electricity. This later put him at odds with Edison, who championed DC (direct current), but Tesla’s model would come out on top as the 19th century came to a close. 

Having established AC as an electrical supply system, Tesla became a global celebrity, and his devices and inventions fascinated people. Tesla tinkered with everything from X-rays to wireless communications and even attempted a primitive form of the radio. While Tesla was not able to successfully execute the devices and concepts he foresaw, his forward thinking in fields like wireless communication certainly proved prescient, and his futuristic devices and his later reputation for eccentricity helped create the “mad scientist” image that still remains a pop culture fixture. Tesla seemed to have come to grips with this aspect of his legacy late in life, noting, “The scientific man does not aim at an immediate result. He does not expect that his advanced ideas will be readily taken up. His work is like that of the planter â?? for the future. His duty is to lay the foundation for those who are to come, and point the way.”



The Works of Alexander Hamilton: Volume 10

by Alexander Hamilton

Unfortunately, one of the best known aspects of Alexander Hamilton’s (1755-1804) life is the manner in which he died, being shot and killed in a famous duel with Aaron Burr in 1804. But Hamilton became one of the most instrumental Founding Fathers of the United States in that time, not only in helping draft and gain support for the U.S. Constitution but in also leading the Federalist party and building the institutions of the young federal government as Washington’s Secretary of Treasury.

Hamilton is also well remembered for his authorship, along with John Jay and James Madison, of the Federalist Papers. The Federalist Papers sought to rally support for the Constitution’s approval when those three anonymously wrote them, but for readers and scholars today they also help us get into the mindset of the Founding Fathers, including the “Father of the Constitution” himself. They also help demonstrate how men of vastly different political ideologies came to accept the same Constitution.

Hamilton was a prominent politician and a prolific writer who had his hand in everything from the Constitution, the Federalist Papers, and President Washington’s speeches, as well as an influential voice in policy and the formation of initial political parties. His works were compiled into a giant 12 volume series by Henry Cabot, which included everything from his speeches to his private correspondence.  This edition of Hamilton’s Works: Volume 10 includes his Private Correspondence from 1792-1804, discussing the politics of the day with other Founding Fathers. It also includes his Last Will and Epitaph.  



The Birds

by Aristophanes

Aristophanes was one of the Ancient Greeks’ most famous playwrights, and some of his works survived to the modern day, including this one.



The Athenian Empire under the Guidance of Pericles

by J.B. Bury

J.B. Bury was a celebrated historian who wrote around the turn of the 19th century.  His classics on the Roman Empire and Greece still stand among the best texts on the classical civilizations.



The World’s Famous Orations: Volume I, Greece (432 B.C.-324 B.C.)

by William Jennings Bryan

William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was a tour de force in American politics around the end of the 19th century. Bryan had a long, distinguished career in politics as a liberal in the Democratic Party, including serving as Secretary of State and presidential candidate. He advocated for democracy, sought peace, and embraced evolution even while opposing the idea of Social Darwinism. Bryan came to be known as “The Great Commoner.”.

Bryan gave 500 speeches in his life and all but invented the idea of stumping for president, so who better than the brilliant, eloquent statesman to edit a compilation of the world’s most famous orations? Bryan covered the most famous speeches given by the most famous people in Western civilization from Ancient Greece to contemporary times. The World’s Famous Orations include speeches from the likes of Socrates, Cicero, Caesar, Antony, Sir Walter Raleigh, Oliver Cromwell, Tecumseh, Ben Franklin, Patrick Henry, Abraham Lincoln, and many more. In all, Bryan included 281 speeches by 213 speakers. Chosen by the best orator of his age, the orations offer readers a glimpse into history’s turning points as well as being a fantastic reference point.

This edition includes Volume 1, which covers the speeches of Ancient Greece. This includes speeches attributed to Socrates, Isocrates, Demosthenes, Pericles, Homer, Alcibiades, and others. 



Commentaries on the Laws of England: All Books

by William Blackstone

While America’s Founding Fathers looked to various sources for political philosophy, the one they turned to predominantly in the field of law was Sir William Blackstone, a barrister and patron of King George III who set out on writing a comprehensive tome of English Common Law. In addition to being a popular work, the massive 4 book Commentaries on the Laws of England brought together all of England’s legal precedents, allowing others (like the Americans) to rely on it while forming their own judicial codes. Even today, the U.S. Supreme Court frequently cites Blackstone when interpreting the Constitution.



The South African Story: 3rd Edition

by Ron McGregor

Ron McGregor is a South African tour-guide and writer. This book – now in it’s 3rd edition – was written in response to popular demand for a book about South Africa that isn’t too weighty or academic. Until recently, there was no such single book, so Ron sat down and wrote it. And, because it was written to entertain as much as to educate, he stuck to his raconteurial style. It’s an easy read, but not a shallow one.

Maps and diagrams to accompany the text were produced by graphic-designer Lisa, Ron’s wife.

This is not just another guide book – it’s a collection of the tales that the author tells as he crosses the country with his travelers. Much of it is historical fact. One reader remarked, “It is the best narrative of South African history I have ever read. It should be in every school curriculum, and compulsory reading for the diplomatic corps!”

However, it’s far more than mere history. History doesn’t just happen, it happens for a reason – many reasons. Geography, climate and vegetation all play their roles in determining the fates of nations, so these are also covered. There’s folklore, and legend, food and drink, and even a guide to vocabulary.

And, of course, there are heroes. From Paul Kruger and Winston Churchill, to Jan Christian Smuts and Nelson Mandela, some formidable actors have graced the South African stage, and they have their chapters in these pages.

From the Dawn of Mankind to the Darkness of Apartheid, and our current faltering steps into the light of liberation, the South African Story tells it all. There’s no other book quite like it.



Home-Making

by J.R. Miller

J.R. Miller was a popular Presbyterian pastor and writer whose most famous work was Home-Making, which guides Christians on how to make a great home through the grace of God.



The Power of Persevering Prayer

by Andrew Murray

Andrew Murray was a South African pastor and a well read author of Christian literature by all denominations.  Murray wrote over 200 books, including Christian classics such as Abide in Christ and Absolute Surrender.



Nicomachean Ethics

by Aristotle

Along with Plato and Socrates, Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) is one of the triumvirate of philosophers responsible for the establishment of Western philosophy as it exists today. Socrates, Plato and Aristotle were among the first to refine philosophical thought, and Socrates is credited with devising the Socratic Method as a way to argue and debate points rationally.  The Ancient Greek philosophers further stressed the importance of virtue and stoicism, advocating the improvement of one’s self through constant learning and knowledge.  These teachings and practices formed the foundation for philosophy and psychology as fields of study.

Still, Aristotle was very much his own philosopher. Though he studied at Plato’s famous academy, he was not hesitant to counter or criticize Plato’s philosophical stances on certain issues. Aristotle was the most renowned Ancient Greek philosopher for nearly 2,000 years.

Aristotle’s book on ethics is perhaps the most important work on the subject as it further explores the Socratic question on how men should best live.



The Lives of the Popes Volumes II-III: The Popes during the Carolingian Empire

by Horace Mann

Mann’s Lives of the Popes is an incredibly expansive chronological history of each of the popes of the Middle Ages. The Lives of the Popes Vols. II-III: The Popes during the Carolingian Empire is a chronology of the popes from Leo III in 795 to Stephen VI in 891 A.D.



The Prayer Life

by Andrew Murray

Andrew Murray was a South African pastor and a well read author of Christian literature by all denominations.  Murray wrote over 200 books, including Christian classics such as Abide in Christ and Absolute Surrender.



Hitler: Hitler’s ANTARCTICA UFOs, the Ahnenerbe Society, the Piri Reis Map, HAARP and other Mysteries (Hitler in Antarctica mysteries, ufo Book 1)

by William.A Smith

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Hitler’s life and his belief in super humans or a superior race is well known, but the extends to which he and his Third Reich went to find these in reality is less known and mind boggling. Hitler believed in the â??Hollow Earth’ theory where according to legends were inhabited by a human race far superior than normal humans on earth. He intended to seek their help and use their superior technology.

So that on every front, from stealth technology to nuclear power Hitler’s push for scientific success fueled by the Nazi dream of a Global Reich – a German Empire lasting a thousand years could be a reality. Hitler believed there was an opening to this â??Hollow Earth’ in the unexplored Antarctica, thus the Fuhrer (Hitler) had sent expeditions to the South pole (aka Antarctica) for the very same purpose. Also he had other intentions like to exploit the vast natural resources of this unexplored continent (the sixth continent bigger than Europe, is rich in Uranium which could really help him fuel-up his super-planes) and also set-up a safe base there.

The Ahnenerbe was an occult society formed by Hitler’s highest ranking officials whose secret intentions was to explore the reality in religions and myths around the world. The idea was to combine the ancient super knowledge to current scientific knowledge and to make the Third Reich â??the Untouchables’. Even now, the secret services of leading powers hunt for Ahnenerbe’s secrets. It is of no doubt that they attained great unknown knowledge and sadly also destroyed some of it (mainly books, they literally burned them on a mass scale) before it could be disclosed to the world. But many records of their quest for ancient knowledge are still hidden out there to be found and benefited from.

According to Ahnenerbe, there were people and civilizations much before the current records of the beginning of humans, who attained much more knowledge and advancements in every fields than the so called â?? Modern men ‘ today. But somehow these civilizations got wiped out completely due to some natural calamity, and thus we humans had to start again from scratch.

Hitler’s Ahnenerbe also believed humans were not alone in this gigantic universe consisting of millions of planets and solar systems (stars). They believed a higher knowledge were locked and hidden away in various parts of the world in the form of ancient manuscripts, carvings, books, etc. And the people who could lay their hands and join the pieces of this â??forgotten ancient puzzle’ (scattered all around the world) could be the new super powers and could rule the world.

Americans have always been interested in the ‘techno-magical’ legacy of Germany. Consequently when they defeated Germany in World War 2, they were eager to attain all the German secret knowledge.

But the allies were shocked to discover that thousands of highly qualified Third Reich specialists had vanished and weren’t listed as dead. Over a 100 German submarines had also vanished, never to be found. The rumor was that these scientists were shifted to Antarctica along with their huge labs and machinery in these missing submarines. Thus America had to make sure that they had completely won over Germany and will not be sadly surprised by an attack with German Super-Weapons, which they may not be able to even respond. So the US military plans a secret expedition to Antarctica code named â?? Operation High jump ‘.

Suddenly the inexplicable occurs; the expedition, designed to last 6 months, is quickly aborted after two months, leaving the Antarctic coast deserted. It was an actual retreat.

(Note: We present