Free biographies and memoirs Kindle books for 17 Dec 15

The Tao of Ben Carson: Words of Wisdom by Ben Carson m.d.

by Aria Tepper

Who is Ben Carson? And what can we learn from him?

Ben Carson is a world-famous neurosurgeon, author, devout christian, and now, US presidential candidate. He is compassionate, giving, sensible, principled, and wise. And there is always something to learn from someone with these qualities. As a man who went from being raised in poverty to running for the next US presidential elections, it is not a surprise that he has much to teach us. His wisdom is most striking – and deceiving – because of its simplicity and power.

This Ben Carson kindle book is a compilation of some of his words of wisdom from his famous books Gifted Hands, A More Perfect Union, Think Big and One Nation . They are explained using his life story and self-help advice that we can all learn from and apply to our everyday lives.

Discover:

– Principles that lead Ben Carson towards success

– Ways of thinking that helped him get through his hardships

– The life story behind his words of wisdom

– Strategies on how you can apply his wisdom to your life

Download this kindle book because you too can learn from Ben Carson today!

(ben carson, ben carson kindle book, ben carson books, ben carson biography, ben carson m.d, ben carson gifted hands, ben carson a more perfect union, ben carson one nation, ben carson think big, ben carson words of wisdom, tao of ben carson)



The Audacious Heart: Lessons On Letting God & Letting Go

by Linda Pharathikoune

About the Book:

The Audacious Heart is part memoir, part inspirational book that recounts the life and lessons of author Linda Pharathikoune. After a buying a one-way ticket to Bali, selling her belongings, and leaving a ten year career, the journey brought her face to face with her past. Told in easy to read vignettes, oscillating between life on the road and her younger years, she confronts heartbreak, loss, regrets, and an estranged relationship with her mother with wisdom, a dash of dry humor, and deep insight. The author’s down to earth feel, warmth, and conversational tone draws you in as if you were sitting with her having a fireside chat.

At the heart of it, this book is about making peace with the past and being open to an unseen power to guide one through it. After all, it takes an audacious heart to be open and willing to face and slay the things that hold us back.

About the Author:

Lao American writer, Linda Pharathikoune was born in Savannah, Ga to immigrant parents displaced after the Vietnam War. She struggled with her identity throughout her life and in 2013, she bought a one-way ticket to Indonesia, ditched her decade long career, and sold all of her belongings… all on an intuitive whim. With only a suitcase and carry-on bag in tow, she set out on an unplanned, live-by-the-seat-of-her-pants adventure to discover what she’d been missing all along: her-SELF.

She has since returned to the states and lives in a small mountain town in Southern California where the welcome sign says, “Welcome to Idyllwild! Home of adventure, music, art, and harmony!” The town’s mayor is a Golden Retriever named Mayor Max. She’s crazy about this place. She is the CEO and Senior Writing Coach of The Writing Room, LLC.

Come by and connect with her on Facebook.com/audaciousL.



If Love Is A Crime

by Sam Hudson

What does a girl do when the man she’s falling for is running a drug ring, and her friend with benefits is the detective bent on catching him?



Stonewall Jackson in the Seven Days Battles: An Excerpt from Life and Campaigns of Stonewall Jackson

by Robert Lewis Dabney

Robert Lewis Dabney (March 5, 1820 – January 3, 1898) was an American Christian theologian, a Southern Presbyterian pastor, and Confederate Army chaplain best known for being chief of staff to General Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson during his famous Valley Campaign and the Seven Days Battles. He also wrote Life and Campaigns of Stonewall Jackson, an invaluable biography of the general that was published in 1866, just a year after the Civil War had ended.

Stonewall Jackson needs no formal introduction, being one of the most famous generals of the Civil War, revered throughout the South for his extremely successful military skill. At the same time, Jackson’s pious Christianity and seeming eccentricities have continued to fascinate historians, scholars and readers, who often still argue why he would hold his left arm up with his palm facing outward while in battle. 

Jackson earned his famous “stonewall” moniker at the Battle of First Bull Run, when Brigadier-General Bee told his brigade to rally behind Jackson, who was standing like a stone wall. General Bee was mortally wounded shortly after giving the order, so it’s still unclear whether that was a compliment for standing strong or an insult for not moving his brigade, but the nickname stuck for the brigade and the general itself.

Stonewall Jackson in the Seven Days Battles is an account of Jackson’s performance around Richmond in June 1862, which culminated with Robert E. Lee taking command of the Army of Northern Virginia and driving the Army of the Potomac away from Richmond in a series of battles over the course of a week. Jackson’s fine career was somewhat tarnished by his unusually poor performance during the week, possibly as a result of physical fatigue. The account of the campaign comes from Dabney’s biography of Jackson. 



Stonewall Jackson at First Manassas: An Excerpt from Life and Campaigns of Stonewall Jackson

by Robert Lewis Dabney

Robert Lewis Dabney (March 5, 1820 – January 3, 1898) was an American Christian theologian, a Southern Presbyterian pastor, and Confederate Army chaplain best known for being chief of staff to General Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson during his famous Valley Campaign and the Seven Days Battles. He also wrote Life and Campaigns of Stonewall Jackson, an invaluable biography of the general that was published in 1866, just a year after the Civil War had ended.

Stonewall Jackson needs no formal introduction, being one of the most famous generals of the Civil War, revered throughout the South for his extremely successful military skill. At the same time, Jackson’s pious Christianity and seeming eccentricities have continued to fascinate historians, scholars and readers, who often still argue why he would hold his left arm up with his palm facing outward while in battle. 

Jackson earned his famous “stonewall” moniker at the Battle of First Bull Run, when Brigadier-General Bee told his brigade to rally behind Jackson, who was standing like a stone wall. General Bee was mortally wounded shortly after giving the order, so it’s still unclear whether that was a compliment for standing strong or an insult for not moving his brigade, but the nickname stuck for the brigade and the general itself.

Stonewall Jackson at First Manassas is an account of Jackson and his brigade at the first major battle of the war, from Dabney’s biography of Jackson. The biography is invaluable not just as a contemporary source but as a study of Lost Cause ideology, coming even before the phrase itself took hold. Dabney’s hatred of the Yankees is evident throughout the book, as is his adulation of Jackson, who comes off as nearly perfect in this book. Slavery is depicted as a benign institution, and the Yankees are treated as inferior in every respect to Southerners. The frequent Lost Cause argument that the South lost only because of inferior manpower and resources can be found in this book, much of which was written before the Confederacy had been defeated. At the same time, Dabney wrote the book to demonstrate the importance of Christianity and its influence on Jackson’s generalship, helping create the image of Confederates as dignified, Christian fighters. The biography will be of interest to anyone interested in Southern attitudes toward the North and the war in the 1860s.



Sir Walter Raleigh

by Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau (born David Henry Thoreau; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) is one of America’s most famous authors and poets, and one of the prominent writers of the Transcendentalist Era in the mid-19th century. Along with Ralph Waldo Emerson, who was a mentor of sorts to Thoreau, the two of them produced large bodies of work that formed the backbone of Transcendentalism. Thoreau in particular was an ardent abolitionist, naturalist, historian, philosopher, and also laid the groundwork for peaceful civil disobedience movements across the world in moral opposition to unjust states.

Thoreau’s most famous work is Walden, which he wrote after living on Walden Pond outside Concord, Massachusetts for over 2 years. Thoreau in particular took a keen interest in the idea of getting in touch with nature, writing in Walden, “Most of the luxuries and many of the so-called comforts of life are not only not indispensable, but positive hindrances to the elevation of mankind.”  



Stonewall Jackson at Fredericksburg: An Excerpt from Life and Campaigns of Stonewall Jackson

by Robert Lewis Dabney

Robert Lewis Dabney (March 5, 1820 – January 3, 1898) was an American Christian theologian, a Southern Presbyterian pastor, and Confederate Army chaplain best known for being chief of staff to General Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson during his famous Valley Campaign and the Seven Days Battles. He also wrote Life and Campaigns of Stonewall Jackson, an invaluable biography of the general that was published in 1866, just a year after the Civil War had ended.

Stonewall Jackson needs no formal introduction, being one of the most famous generals of the Civil War, revered throughout the South for his extremely successful military skill. At the same time, Jackson’s pious Christianity and seeming eccentricities have continued to fascinate historians, scholars and readers, who often still argue why he would hold his left arm up with his palm facing outward while in battle. 

Jackson earned his famous “stonewall” moniker at the Battle of First Bull Run, when Brigadier-General Bee told his brigade to rally behind Jackson, who was standing like a stone wall. General Bee was mortally wounded shortly after giving the order, so it’s still unclear whether that was a compliment for standing strong or an insult for not moving his brigade, but the nickname stuck for the brigade and the general itself.

Jackson would go on to lead an army to one of the most incredible campaigns of the war in the Shenandoah Valley in 1862. Known as the Valley Campaign, Jackson kept 3 Union armies occupied north of Richmond with less than 1/3 of the men. Jackson’s forces marched about 650 miles in just 3 months, earning the nickname “foot cavalry.” 

Stonewall Jackson at Fredericksburg is an account of Jackson’s performance during the battle of Fredericksburg and the winter months following the battle. The account of the campaign comes from Dabney’s biography of Jackson. The biography is invaluable not just as a contemporary source but as a study of Lost Cause ideology, coming even before the phrase itself took hold. Dabney’s hatred of the Yankees is evident throughout the book, as is his adulation of Jackson, who comes off as nearly perfect in this book. Slavery is depicted as a benign institution, and the Yankees are treated as inferior in every respect to Southerners. The frequent Lost Cause argument that the South lost only because of inferior manpower and resources can be found in this book, much of which was written before the Confederacy had been defeated. At the same time, Dabney wrote the book to demonstrate the importance of Christianity and its influence on Jackson’s generalship, helping create the image of Confederates as dignified, Christian fighters. The biography will be of interest to anyone interested in Southern attitudes toward the North and the war in the 1860s.



Tara’s Halls: Growing Up in Hard Times in Ireland: An Inspiring Memoir

by Tom Gallagher

Life on a farm in the West of Ireland in the 1950s and 60s is anything but easy. Marked by scarcity and hardship, most families have a hard time simply keeping a roof over their heads and food in the mouths of their ever-expanding broods of children.

Though at age fourteen and still technically a boy, young Tom Gallagher already does the work of an adult. His father works in England most of the year, returning each spring for a few weeks to cut the year’s supply of fuel and plant the crops. When his father stops coming, brother Eamon, at sixteen, becomes man of the house. When Eamon bails out to England, Tom, at fourteen, steps into his brother’s larger shoes and assumes the responsibility for completing the heavy tasks of farming with little mechanization–and impossible without the help of his mother and sisters.

In this engaging memoir about growing up in hard times, Gallagher weaves the story of his own hardscrabble childhood through the larger cultural and historical contexts of the time, crafting a fascinating look at one young boy’s life and the world in which he lived.

Never resorting to self-pity or sentimentalism, Gallagher tells his tale in the great traditions of Irish storytellers, mixing plenty of wit, humor, and irony with the gritty realities of his experience–and the result is mesmerizing.



Carpe Diem

by Pino Ranieri

Oltre le distanze…  Beyond distances â?¦

I left my body on November 20, 2014. Here are just a few words, charged with emotion, for those who never stopped believing in love and who never, ever give up.

 Synopsis

This is a small collection of writings and poems written from the soul to reach the heart of people all over the world. Your contribution is simply to read this book, just this will turn a dream into reality. If this book has found its way to you it is because you have a generous heart. You are participating in a gift that a daughter wishes to share in memory of her dear father. All you need to do is read it, and then pass it on to someone who would enjoy it. Someone dear to you, who would then pass this book on to someone else, so that many people can share and enjoy this small but heartfelt gift …



The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government: Volume II

by Jefferson Davis

Many Southerners and Northerners wrote about the Civil War after it was over, but none of them held as senior a position as Jefferson Davis, the Confederate president. While other generals wrote memoirs that historians still continue to debate about, Davis wrote the most comprehensive tome about the political aspects of the Civil War, particularly his fullthroated defense of the Confederacy’s right to secede.

His memoir, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, is one of the most controversial works to come out of the Civil War.  Volume I explains the political background of the country before the war, as well as his analysis of the Constitution and the right to secede. Volume II picks up where Volume I left off, with the seminal events of 1862 following the secession and the first battles of 1861. Volume II covers everything from 1862 to the end of the war.



The Future of the American Negro

by Booker T. Washington

From 1890-1915, the most influential black man in America was Booker T. Washington, who less than 35 years earlier had been born into slavery. The young boy worked laboriously until emancipation before going on to seek an education. By the time he was 40, he was consolidating a network of supporters that came to be known as the “Tuskegee Machine,” helping coordinate action with the support of black businesses, religious communities, and others. With his position of power, Washington spoke out against Jim Crow laws and Southern disfranchisement of blacks.

By the early 20th century, Washington’s tactics were questioned by other black leaders, notably W. E. B. Du Bois, who wanted to protest more vehemently in an effort to secure civil rights. Washington believed confrontation would only hurt the cause, and that cooperation and softer tones would wear down racism over time. To that end, both men wrote voluminously in support of their stances and thoughts. Washington wrote 14 books, including his renowned autobiography, Up From Slavery, which was published in 1901. Washington continues to be recognized for helping to improve the relationships between blacks and whites, as well as helping blacks get further access to education and civil rights. 



Battles & Leaders of the Civil War: Henry Hunt’s Account of the Battle of Gettysburg

by Henry J. Hunt

Henry Jackson Hunt (September 14, 1819 – February 11, 1889) was Chief of Artillery in the Army of the Potomac during the Civil War. Considered by his contemporaries the greatest artillery tactician and strategist of the war, he was a master of the science of gunnery and rewrote the manual on the organization and use of artillery in early modern armies. His courage and tactics affected the outcome of some of the most significant battles in the war.
In 1856 Hunt was a member of a three-man board that revised field artillery drill and tactics for the army. The Instructions for Field Artillery manual written by the three was published by the War Department in 1861 and was the “bible” of Northern field artillerists during the war. He was a principal proponent of the organizational doctrine that allowed infantry brigades to retain artillery batteries for close-in support, but that moved batteries formerly assigned to divisions and corps to an Artillery Reserve at the army level for more strategic control.

Hunt’s most important role during the war came at Gettysburg, especially on Day 3. Although Hunt was involved in the artillery the previous two days, it was his handling of the artillery was conspicuous in the repulse of Pickett’s Charge on July 3. In particular, with the Union line on Cemetery Ridge under massive bombardment, Hunt was able to resist command pressure that would have expended all his ammunition in counter-battery fire, reserving sufficient amounts for anti-personnel fire in the attack he knew was coming. Additionally, his orders to cease firing fooled the Confederates into thinking his batteries were destroyed, thus allowing Pickett’s Charge to proceed. Once it did, Hunt’s concealed placement of Lt. Col. Freeman McGilvery’s batteries north of Little Round Top caused massive casualties in the infantry assault. He was rewarded for his service with the brevet of colonel in the regular army.

After the war, the artillery chief wrote a critically acclaimed account of the Battle of Gettysburg, covering all three days in separate essays within the well known and highly regarded Battles & Leaders series. 



Battles & Leaders of the Civil War: Lee’s Invasion of Pennsylvania

by James Longstreet

One of the most important Confederate generals of the Civil War was Lieutenant General James Longstreet, the man Robert E. Lee called his “old war horse.” Longstreet was arguably the best corps commander the Confederates have, and he played crucial roles at Antietam, Second Bull Run, Chickamauga, the Wilderness, and Fredericksburg. However, Longstreet had a controversial role at Gettysburg, when he was unable to roll up the Union Army of the Potomac’s flank on Day 2 and Pickett’s Charge failed on Day 3. Though Longstreet tried to talk Lee out of the attacks, they went forward, and Longstreet criticized Lee about them afterward, making him reviled among other Confederates. In turn, they tried to blame him for the loss at Gettysburg.  

Just a few years before his death, Longstreet finally published his crucial memoirs, From Manassas to Appomattox, which talked about his experiences and analysis of the decisions made during the war. Longstreet wrote it to respond to his own critics and because Lee himself didn’t write any. Regardless, they are one of the most important post-war writings of any general on either side of the Civil War.

In one of the most famous Battles & Leaders essays, Longstreet discusses the beginning of the Pennsylvania Campaign and the run up to Day 1 of Gettysburg, including his conversation with the scout Harrison that became part of Michael Sharaa’s Killer Angels. This edition of Lee’s Invasion of Pennsylvania is specially formatted with maps of the campaign and pictures of its important commanders.



Battles & Leaders of the Civil War: General John Pope at the Second Battle of Bull Run

by John Pope

John Pope (March 16, 1822 – September 23, 1892) was a career United States Army officer and Union general in the American Civil War. He had a brief but successful career in the Western Theater, but he is best known for his disastrous defeat at the Second Battle of Bull Run (Second Manassas) against Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia.

Pope’s success in the West inspired the Lincoln administration to bring him to the troubled Eastern Theater to lead the newly formed Army of Virginia. He initially alienated many of his officers and men by publicly denigrating their record in comparison to his Western command. He launched an offensive against the Confederate army of General Robert E. Lee, in which he fell prey to a strategic turning movement into his rear areas by Stonewall Jackson. At Second Bull Run, he concentrated his attention on attacking Jackson while the other Confederate corps, under General James Longstreet, executed a devastating assault into his flank, routing his army. Pope went on to blame his defeat by accusing General Fitz John Porter of disobeying his orders, leading to a court martial that cashiered Porter out of the Army. Porter would be exonerated in 1879, causing much public embarrassment for Pope. Following Manassas, Pope was banished far from the Eastern Theater to Minnesota, where he commanded U.S. Forces in the Dakota War of 1862.

After the war, Pope wrote an account of the campaign that became part of the well known Battles & Leaders of the Civil War series. It discusses his decisions and actions, mostly as an attempt to explain and justify the resulting Confederate victory and to hold himself above the fray. Pope ends his account by explaining that the reasons the Confederates were so victorious were still largely unknown to the country.  



Got a new Kindle or know someone who has? Check out the ultimate guide to finding free books for your Kindle. Also available in the UK.