Free history Kindle books for 17 Dec 15

Free Books For History Lovers: Over 200 Free Downloadable History Books (Free Books for a Quick Download)

Welcome to a treasure chest of FREE books on History from ancient times to the First World War, presently available on Amazon! In this book, you will have free access to over 200 scholarly works, relating to almost every period in Western and Middle-Eastern History. The books have been organized according to major historical periods, as they would be in any major Western history text. Each title is linked with the Amazon page where the book is offered. Simply click on the title that interests you and then download it on your Kindle or your computer.

Mike Caputo

C. Ellerton “Great For Historical Knowledge.” Amazon.UK, Reader — 5 stars.

Adam “Great books. I am glad someone took the time to curate this.” (Reader) — 5 stars



On Idolatry

by Tertullian

Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, commonly referred to as Tertullian (c. 160 – c. 220 AD), was raised in Carthage. He was thought to be the son of a Roman centurion, a trained lawyer, and an ordained priest. These assertions rely on the accounts of Eusebius of Caesarea, Church History,  and St. Jerome’s De viris illustribus (On famous men).

Tertullian is the first Christian author to produce an extensive corpus of Latin Christian literature. He also was a notable early Christian apologist and a polemicist against heresy. Tertullian has been called “the father of Latin Christianity”and “the founder of Western theology.” Though conservative, he did originate and advance new theology to the early Church. He is perhaps most famous for being the oldest extant Latin writer to use the term Trinity (Latin trinitas),and giving the oldest extant formal exposition of a Trinitarian theology.[Other Latin formulations that first appear in his work are “three Persons, one Substance” as the Latin “tres Personae, una Substantia” . He wrote his trinitarian formula after becoming a Montanist; his ideas were at first rejected as heresy by the church at large, but later accepted as Christian orthodoxyScant reliable evidence exists to inform us about Tertullian’s life. Most history about him comes from passing references in his own writings.



A Collection of Historic Pictures from the Siege of Petersburg

by Various Authors

*Includes nearly 50 pictures taken at Petersburg during and after the fighting

From May-June 1864, newly installed U.S. Army Commander Ulysses S. Grant attached himself to George Meade’s Army of the Potomac and directed that army’s confrontation of Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia in a series of very high casualty battles known as the Overland Campaign. Despite being stopped at the Battle of the Wilderness, Grant proceeded south and nearly dealt the Confederate army a fatal blow at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, and the armies kept maneuvering toward Richmond and fought near the North Anna River before the Battle of Cold Harbor in early June.

Eventually the Overland Campaign ended in a stalemate siege at Petersburg that could accurately be described as a forerunner of the trench warfare of World War I. With both armies hunkered down in trenches and fighting tooth and nail over a few miles of ground, the Union’s war effort was able to coordinate George H. Thomas’ victories against John Bell Hood in the West while General William Tecumseh Sherman “marched to the sea”, taking Savannah and then Charleston on his way north.

Finally, Grant broke Lee’s lines in early April, forcing the Confederates to abandon Petersburg and Richmond, their capital. A week later, Lee would famously surrender to Grant at Appomattox, an event many consider the end of the Civil War.

A Collection of Historic Pictures from the Siege of Petersburg is a collection of nearly 50 pictures taken during and immediately after the deadly siege. This edition also includes pictures of some of the famous generals who participated in the siege. 



Helps to Intercession

by Andrew Murray

Andrew Murray was a South African pastor and a well read author of Christian literature by all denominations.  Murray wrote over 200 books, including Christian classics such as Abide in Christ and Absolute Surrender.



On Electricity

by Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla was one of history’s greatest scientists, and though he is best known for his pioneering work with electricity, the fact that he is mostly remembered solely for that actually does a disservice to his legacy. Born a Serb in the Austrian Empire, Tesla came to the United States and worked in a laboratory for none other than the Wizard of Menlo Park, Thomas Edison.

It was through his work on behalf of Edison that Tesla flourished and became a well-known figure in his own right. His work there helped him establish financial backing for his own projects, particularly the design of AC (alternating current) as a system for supplying electricity. This later put him at odds with Edison, who championed DC (direct current), but Tesla’s model would come out on top as the 19th century came to a close. 

Having established AC as an electrical supply system, Tesla became a global celebrity, and his devices and inventions fascinated people. Tesla tinkered with everything from X-rays to wireless communications and even attempted a primitive form of the radio. While Tesla was not able to successfully execute the devices and concepts he foresaw, his forward thinking in fields like wireless communication certainly proved prescient, and his futuristic devices and his later reputation for eccentricity helped create the “mad scientist” image that still remains a pop culture fixture. Tesla seemed to have come to grips with this aspect of his legacy late in life, noting, “The scientific man does not aim at an immediate result. He does not expect that his advanced ideas will be readily taken up. His work is like that of the planter â?? for the future. His duty is to lay the foundation for those who are to come, and point the way.”



The Jerusalem Sinner Saved

by John Bunyan

John Bunyan (1628-1688) was an English Christian writer and preacher, famous for writing Pilgrim’s Progress. Though he was a Reformed Baptist, in the Church of England he is remembered with a Lesser Festival on August 30, and on the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church (USA) on August 29.

Bunyan wrote The Pilgrim’s Progress in two parts, the first of which was published in London in 1678 and the second in 1684. He began the work in his first period of imprisonment, and probably finished it during the second. The earliest edition in which the two parts combined in one volume came in 1728. A third part falsely attributed to Bunyan appeared in 1693, and was reprinted as late as 1852. Its full title is The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come.

The Pilgrim’s Progress is arguably one of the most widely known allegories ever written, and has been extensively translated. Protestant missionaries commonly translated it as the first thing after the Bible. At one time, The Pilgrim’s Progress was considered the most widely read and translated book in the English language apart from the Bible.



History of Greece, Volume 2: Grecian History to the Reign of Pisistratus at Athens

by George Grote

George Grote was a 19th century historian who wrote a seminal and comprehensive multi-volume history on Ancient Greece, covering its legendary beginnings and spanning all the way to the end of Greek independence in the last few centuries BCE. His work is a must read for anyone interested in antiquity.



Jesus Himself

by Andrew Murray

Andrew Murray was a South African pastor and a well read author of Christian literature by all denominations.  Murray wrote over 200 books, including Christian classics such as Abide in Christ and Absolute Surrender.



Talking with Planets

by Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla was one of history’s greatest scientists, and though he is best known for his pioneering work with electricity, the fact that he is mostly remembered solely for that actually does a disservice to his legacy. Born a Serb in the Austrian Empire, Tesla came to the United States and worked in a laboratory for none other than the Wizard of Menlo Park, Thomas Edison.

It was through his work on behalf of Edison that Tesla flourished and became a well-known figure in his own right. His work there helped him establish financial backing for his own projects, particularly the design of AC (alternating current) as a system for supplying electricity. This later put him at odds with Edison, who championed DC (direct current), but Tesla’s model would come out on top as the 19th century came to a close. 

Having established AC as an electrical supply system, Tesla became a global celebrity, and his devices and inventions fascinated people. Tesla tinkered with everything from X-rays to wireless communications and even attempted a primitive form of the radio. While Tesla was not able to successfully execute the devices and concepts he foresaw, his forward thinking in fields like wireless communication certainly proved prescient, and his futuristic devices and his later reputation for eccentricity helped create the “mad scientist” image that still remains a pop culture fixture. Tesla seemed to have come to grips with this aspect of his legacy late in life, noting, “The scientific man does not aim at an immediate result. He does not expect that his advanced ideas will be readily taken up. His work is like that of the planter â?? for the future. His duty is to lay the foundation for those who are to come, and point the way.”



A Treatise on the Fear of God

by John Bunyan

John Bunyan (1628-1688) was an English Christian writer and preacher, famous for writing Pilgrim’s Progress. Though he was a Reformed Baptist, in the Church of England he is remembered with a Lesser Festival on August 30, and on the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church (USA) on August 29.

Bunyan wrote The Pilgrim’s Progress in two parts, the first of which was published in London in 1678 and the second in 1684. He began the work in his first period of imprisonment, and probably finished it during the second. The earliest edition in which the two parts combined in one volume came in 1728. A third part falsely attributed to Bunyan appeared in 1693, and was reprinted as late as 1852. Its full title is The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come.

The Pilgrim’s Progress is arguably one of the most widely known allegories ever written, and has been extensively translated. Protestant missionaries commonly translated it as the first thing after the Bible. At one time, The Pilgrim’s Progress was considered the most widely read and translated book in the English language apart from the Bible.



The First Four Councils of Constantinople

by Anonymous

In 359 A.D., the Roman Emperor Constantius II requested a church council, at Constantinople, of both the eastern and western bishops, to resolve the split at the Council of Seleucia. According to Socrates Scholasticus, only about 50 of the Eastern bishops, and an unspecified number of the western ones, actually attended.

Over the next few centuries, there would be several more councils at Constantinople to resolve religious matters within the Church. This collection of documents includes what came out of the first four councils held at Constantinople. 



A New System of Alternating Current Motors and Transformers

by Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla was one of history’s greatest scientists, and though he is best known for his pioneering work with electricity, the fact that he is mostly remembered solely for that actually does a disservice to his legacy. Born a Serb in the Austrian Empire, Tesla came to the United States and worked in a laboratory for none other than the Wizard of Menlo Park, Thomas Edison.

It was through his work on behalf of Edison that Tesla flourished and became a well-known figure in his own right. His work there helped him establish financial backing for his own projects, particularly the design of AC (alternating current) as a system for supplying electricity. This later put him at odds with Edison, who championed DC (direct current), but Tesla’s model would come out on top as the 19th century came to a close. 

Having established AC as an electrical supply system, Tesla became a global celebrity, and his devices and inventions fascinated people. Tesla tinkered with everything from X-rays to wireless communications and even attempted a primitive form of the radio. While Tesla was not able to successfully execute the devices and concepts he foresaw, his forward thinking in fields like wireless communication certainly proved prescient, and his futuristic devices and his later reputation for eccentricity helped create the “mad scientist” image that still remains a pop culture fixture. Tesla seemed to have come to grips with this aspect of his legacy late in life, noting, “The scientific man does not aim at an immediate result. He does not expect that his advanced ideas will be readily taken up. His work is like that of the planter â?? for the future. His duty is to lay the foundation for those who are to come, and point the way.”



The Garden of the Heart

by J.R. Miller

J.R. Miller was a popular Presbyterian pastor and writer whose most famous work was Home-Making, which guides Christians on how to make a great home through the grace of God.



The German Mass and Order of Divine Service

by Martin Luther

Martin Luther was one of the most influential men of the last millennium, and the man most responsible for the Reformation that split the Catholic Church in the 16th century. A German theologian, Luther wrote at length criticizing the Church and sparked the Reformation, all while being one of the most read authors on the continent in his lifetime. His teachings included important departures from Church dogma, including the claim that absolution of sin could not be purchased. Today his 95 Theses are among the most famous works in the world.



The Complete Surviving Plays of Aeschylus: 7 Classic Tragedies

by Aeschylus

Along with Sophocles and Euripides, Aeschylus (circa 524-455 B.C.) is one of the triumvirate of Ancient Greek playwrights responsible for much of the establishment of Western drama as it exists today. Aeschylus was the first whose work survived and is credited as the Father of Tragedy, though the other two are probably better known in the West today. He was famous even among his contemporaries; Aristotle mentions how he revolutionized plays by creating more characters and having them interact with each other to produce conflict.

Some of the Ancient Greeks’ most famous characters are famous because of Aeschylus, none more so than Orestes. Aeschylus is believed to have written nearly 100 plays, but less than 10 survived, chief among them being the trilogy known as The Oresteia, consisting of the three tragedies Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers and The Eumenides. He’s also credited for Prometheus Bound, though the authorship of that one is still in dispute. 



Army Heroes in the War on Terrorism

by C. Douglas Sterner

“U.S. Army Heroes in the War on Terrorism – Operation Enduring Freedom” contains the names, and in most cases a photo and citation for the men and one woman who earned awards of the Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross, and Silver Star in Afghanistan from 2001 to 2015. Multiple Appendixes analyze the awards and recipients by such criteria as rank, unit, specialty, home town, and more.



A Hit Waiting to Happen

by James Duffy

Was the “official” verdict that Lee Harvey Oswald was the Lone Crazed Gunman announced by highly-placed government officials within days of the JFK assassination – long before the Warren Commission had held its first meeting?

Did official U.S. Government investigations document unequivocal proof that -prior to Dallas- there was at least one earlier plot to assassinate JFK from a high building during one of his habitual open motorcade rides; and that the plans included a subsequent rub-out of the assassin?

Did the likes of mob bosses like Carlos Marcello and Santos Trafficante, labor boss Jimmy Hoffa and certain elements of the anti-Castro Cuban movement have a number of common interests, one of which was to assassinate President Kennedy?

Did life-long mobster Jack Ruby shoot Oswald out of patriotism and sorrow for Jackie as he claimed, or was that an excuse spoon-fed to him by his lawyer?

Was Oswald the dull-witted, crazed loner he has been painted to be, or did he have an IQ that placed him in the upper range of bright normal intelligence and documented connections to a number of very interesting people? Are there any documented relationships of Oswald with actual pro-Castro or pro-Communist people; or, to the contrary, did Oswald have unequivocally documented ties to anti-Castro Cubans and organized crime figures, both groups of which had working relationships with U.S. Intelligence operatives?

The answer to these and numerous other questions actually exists in official U.S. Government documents including the testimony and exhibits of the Warren Report – they had the answers to the above questions in their own documents but omitted any reference to that material in their Report.

Do you agree that the public is entitled to know ALL the evidence in the U.S. Government investigations and the public is entitled to draw its own conclusions when ALL the evidence is considered and evaluated?

Unlike most books revolving about the Kennedy Assassination, the author, leading trial lawyer James Duffy, using only official U.S. Government documents and reports, pieces together an unbelievable-yet-true scenario that differs substantially from what we have been led to believe about the accused assassin and the mobster who then assassinated him. Here is the chilling story of one of history’s most bewildering characters, and the evidence seemingly linking him to remarkably diverse groups including: – intelligence agents & underworld bosses, – communists & anti-communists, patriots & spies, big shots & bimbos – a web of bizarre, indeed shocking, activities ranging from infiltration & subversion to assassination plots against leaders of several countries. Avoiding irresponsible, speculative theories, Duffy sticks to using the government’s own “evidence” (much of which has been overlooked or ignored); presents the evidence & allows you to draw your own conclusions as to the questions – “Who was Lee Harvey Oswald? – Why did Jack Ruby shoot him? – Are these unrelated questions?” James Duffy has lectured and been interviewed throughout the United States and Great Britain as an expert on the mysterious and largely unknown background of Lee Harvey Oswald.

Praise for Duffy’s landmark analysis* of Lee Harvey Oswald:

“A highly credible, convincing account that sheds valuable light on the plot to assassinate President Kennedy” DAVID E. SCHEIM, Author of: CONTRACT ON AMERICA: The Mafia Murder of President John F. Kennedy

“The most succinct and convincing presentation of the known circumstantial evidence suggesting that there was a criminal conspiracy to assassinate President Kennedy that I have ever read” JOHN H. DAVIS, Author of: MAFIA KINGFISH: Carlos Marcello and The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy

“In a thought provoking reevaluation of Oswald, Duffy uses his experience as a respected trial lawyer to piece together the reams of information for his penetrating analysis â?¦” Former U.S. Senator Alphonse D’Amato



The Oresteia Trilogy

by Aeschylus

Along with Sophocles and Euripides, Aeschylus (circa 524-455 B.C.) is one of the triumvirate of Ancient Greek playwrights responsible for much of the establishment of Western drama as it exists today. Aeschylus was the first whose work survived and is credited as the Father of Tragedy, though the other two are probably better known in the West today. He was famous even among his contemporaries; Aristotle mentions how he revolutionized plays by creating more characters and having them interact with each other to produce conflict.

Some of the Ancient Greeks’ most famous characters are famous because of Aeschylus, none more so than Orestes. Aeschylus is believed to have written nearly 100 plays, but less than 10 survived, chief among them being the trilogy known as The Oresteia, consisting of the three tragedies Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers and The Eumenides. He’s also credited for Prometheus Bound, though the authorship of that one is still in dispute. 



Confederate Military History: The Battle of Shiloh

by Clement A. Evans

Confederate Military History is a 12-volume series of books written and/or edited by former Confederate general Clement A. Evans that deals with specific topics related to the military personalities, places, battles, and campaigns in various Southern United States, including those of the Confederacy.

Written with a heavy Southern slant, the articles that comprise the compendium deal with the famous events of the war. This account is of the Battle of Shiloh, fought in April 1862. At the time, it was the largest battle of the Civil War to date, and it saw the Confederate army under Albert Sydney Johnston surprise Ulysses S. Grant’s forces, nearly driving them all the way back to Pittsburg Landing. With the help of William Tecumseh Sherman however, the Union forces were able to regroup and push back on the second day of the battle, April 7, forcing the Confederates to retreat. Contained in the State of Tennessee’s Volume, this account has a decided Southern bias and focuses on Tennessee soldiers.



Confederate Military History: The First Shenandoah Valley Campaign, April-July 1861

by Clement A. Evans

Confederate Military History is a 12-volume series of books written and/or edited by former Confederate general Clement A. Evans that deals with specific topics related to the military personalities, places, battles, and campaigns in various Southern United States, including those of the Confederacy.

Written with a heavy Southern slant, the articles that comprise the compendium deal with the famous events of the war. This account is of the First Shenandoah Valley Campaign in 1861, which took place after the attack on Fort Sumter in April 1861 and culminated with a Confederate army transporting itself from the Valley to the battlefield of Manassas to participate in the Battle of First Manassas or First Bull Run, fought on July 21, 1861. The battle, a decisive Confederate victory, was the first major battle of the Civil War and was the first time in history that troops rode a train to the battlefield to participate on the same day. 



The Lion Hunter, in the Days when All of South Africa Was Virgin Hunting Field

by Ronaleyn Gordon-Cumming

Gordon-Cumming was a well-known “lion hunter” who went on safaris and hunting expeditions, and The Lion Hunter is a description of hunting in South Africa in the early 19th century.



American Book of Golden Deeds

by James Baldwin

James Baldwin was self-educated and one of the most prolific writers of school books for children in the 20th century.  



Commentaries on the Laws of England Book 3: Of Private Wrongs

by William Blackstone

While America’s Founding Fathers looked to various sources for political philosophy, the one they turned to predominantly in the field of law was Sir William Blackstone, a barrister and patron of King George III who set out on writing a comprehensive tome of English Common Law. In addition to being a popular work, the massive 4 book Commentaries on the Laws of England brought together all of England’s legal precedents, allowing others (like the Americans) to rely on it while forming their own judicial codes. Even today, the U.S. Supreme Court frequently cites Blackstone when interpreting the Constitution.

Book 3, titled Of Private Wrongs, is about what the American judicial system calls torts, civil laws that prohibit certain non-criminal acts. Blackstone analyzes all kinds of these offenses, including trespassing, nuisance, and the civil procedure that went along with them.



The World’s Famous Orations: All Volumes

by William Jennings Bryan

William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was a tour de force in American politics around the end of the 19th century. Bryan had a long, distinguished career in politics as a liberal in the Democratic Party, including serving as Secretary of State and presidential candidate. He advocated for democracy, sought peace, and embraced evolution even while opposing the idea of Social Darwinism. Bryan came to be known as “The Great Commoner.”.

Bryan gave 500 speeches in his life and all but invented the idea of stumping for president, so who better than the brilliant, eloquent statesman to edit a compilation of the world’s most famous orations? Bryan covered the most famous speeches given by the most famous people in Western civilization from Ancient Greece to contemporary times. The World’s Famous Orations include speeches from the likes of Socrates, Cicero, Caesar, Antony, Sir Walter Raleigh, Oliver Cromwell, Tecumseh, Ben Franklin, Patrick Henry, Abraham Lincoln, and many more. In all, Bryan included 281 speeches by 213 speakers. Chosen by the best orator of his age, the orations offer readers a glimpse into history’s turning points as well as being a fantastic reference point.



The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut

by Anonymous

The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut may seem like a quirky name, but behind it is the first written constitution in the history of the West.

In 1635 a group of Massachusetts Puritans and Congregationalists who were dissatisfied with the rate of Anglican reforms sought to establish an ecclesiastical society subject to their own rules and regulations. The Massachusetts General Court granted them permission to settle the cities of Springfield, Windsor, Wethersfield, and Hartford in modern day Connecticut. Ownership of the land was called into dispute by the English holders of the Warwick Patent of 1631. The Massachusetts General Court established the March Commission to mediate the dispute, and named Roger Ludlow as its head. The Commission named 8 magistrates from the Connecticut towns to implement a legal system. The March commission expired in March 1636, after which time the settlers continued to self-govern. On May 29, 1638 Ludlow wrote to Massachusetts Governor Winthrop that the colonists wanted to “unite ourselves to walk and lie peaceably and lovingly together.” Ludlow drafted the Fundamental Orders, which were adopted on January 24, 1639, establishing Connecticut as an independent colony.

The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut contains certain principles that were later applied in creating the United States government, such as government being based in the rights of an individual. This “social contract theory” came straight from older 17th century political philosophers like John Locke. The Orders also spelled out some of those rights, and how they were to be ensured by the government. It provides that all free men share in electing their magistrates, and uses secret, paper ballots. It states the powers of the government, and some limits within which that power is exercised.



The 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith

by Various Authors

The 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith was written by Particular Baptists, who held to a Calvinistic Soteriology in England to give a formal expression of their Christian faith from a Baptist perspective. This confession, like The Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) and the Savoy Declaration (1658), was written by Puritans who were concerned that their particular church organisation reflected what they perceived to be Biblical teaching.
The 1689 Confession, alongside the Westminster Confession and Savoy Declaration, are considered to be the most important Reformed Confessions made in the English-speaking world. There is no doubt that the 1689 confession relied heavily upon the work already done in writing the two other confessions, but this is not to understate its importance and influence in Baptist churches specifically, and Reformed and Calvinistic churches generally, since that point.

Particular Baptists were quick to develop churches in colonial America, and in 1707 the Philadelphia Baptist Association was formed. This association formally adopted the 1689 confession in 1742 after years of tacit endorsement by individual churches and congregational members. With the addition of two chapters (on the singing of psalms and the laying on of hands), it was retitled The Philadelphia Confession of Faith Further Calvinistic Baptist church associations formed in the mid-late 18th century and adopted the confession as “The Baptist Confession”.



The History of the Standard Oil Company: Volume 2 of 2

by Ida Tarbell

Ida Tarbell was a famous journalist and author who wrote a bunch of scathing works about the robber barons and monopolies at the turn of the century, helping steer public opinion towards the kind of progressive policies and anti-trust laws passed by President Theodore Roosevelt in the early 1900s.



Meditations on First Philosophy

by René Descartes

René Descartes (1596-1650) is not only one of the men who belongs in the pantheon of the West’s greatest thinkers: he influenced everyone else who belongs there too. Descartes was a French philosopher, mathematician and writer who spent most of his life in the Dutch Republic during its Golden Age, where he earned the title “Father of Modern Philosophy.” Indeed, subsequent Western philosophy came from his writing on empiricism and thought, which are still studied today. His work in mathematics helped establish the Cartesian coordinate systemâ??allowing algebraic equations to be expressed as geometric shapes.

Descartes was also one of the key figures in the Scientific Revolution, leaving a lasting mark with Discourse on the Method, one of the most important works ever written in the West.  The Discourse is broken down into six parts, which Descartes described as 1. various considerations touching the Sciences; 2. the principal rules of the Method which the Author has discovered; 3. certain of the rules of Morals which he has deduced from this Method; 4. the reasonings by which he establishes the existence of God and of the Human Soul; 5. the order of the Physical questions which he has investigated, and, in particular, the explication of the motion of the heart and of some other difficulties pertaining to Medicine, as also the difference between the soul of man and that of the brutes; and 6. what the Author believes to be required in order to greater advancement in the investigation of Nature than has yet been made, with the reasons that have induced him to write.



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