Free history Kindle books for 19 Dec 15

Ten Days That Shook the World

by John Reed

“Adventure it was, and one of the most marvellous mankind ever embarked upon, sweeping into history at the head of the toiling masses, and staking everything on their vast and simple desires. Already the machinery had been set up by which the land of the great estates could be distributed among the peasants.” – John Reed

John Reed’s Ten Days that Shook the World, published in 1922, is a gripping account of the Russian Revolution that took place just years earlier in the midst of World War I. Of course, nobody knew at the time just how important the Russian Revolution would be geopolitically, especially with the advent of the Cold War less than 25 years later. Reed’s account was firsthand; as a journalist, he was in Russia when the Revolution transpired. The book was popular and influential enough that it made the rounds among Russia’s leadership, with Stalin himself arguing against some of Reed’s theses.



The Power of the Blood of Jesus

by Andrew Murray

Andrew Murray was a South African pastor and a well read author of Christian literature by all denominations.  Murray wrote over 200 books, including Christian classics such as Abide in Christ and Absolute Surrender.



The Book of Jubilees

by Anonymous

The Book of Jubilees, or, as it is sometimes called, “the little Genesis,” purports to be a revelation given by God to Moses through the medium of an angel, and containing a history, divided up into jubilee-periods of forty-nine years, from the creation to the coming of Moses.  
 
From the preface: 
 
“THE object of this series of translations is primarily to furnish students with short, cheap, and handy text-books, which, it is hoped, will facilitate the study of the particular texts in class under competent teachers. But it is also hoped that the volumes will be acceptable to the general reader who may be interested in the subjects with which they deal. It has been thought advisable, as a general rule, to restrict the notes and comments to a small compass; more especially as, in most cases, excellent works of a more elaborate character are available. Indeed, it is much to be desired that these translations may have the effect of inducing readers to study the larger works. 

Our principal aim, in a word, is to make some difficult texts, important for the study of Christian origins, more generally accessible in faithful and scholarly translations. 

In most cases these texts are not available in a cheap and handy form. In one or two cases texts have been included of books which are available in the official Apocrypha; but in every such case reasons exist for putting forth these texts in a new translation, with an Introduction, in this series.”



Democracy in America: All Volumes

by Alexis de Tocqueville

Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America is perhaps the most famous analysis of the social and political structure of the United States in the early 19th century. As a contemporary of the Founding Fathers and a detached objective observer, de Tocqueville is one of the most important political scientists to write about America, and many of his observations on issues like slavery would prove particularly prescient. As a result, his seminal work is still considered a must read for anyone interested in American history.



Commentaries on Christian Life

by John Calvin

John Calvin (10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was one of the most influential Christians of the last millennium. An influential French theologian and pastor during the Protestant Reformation, Calvin was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later named after him. Originally trained as a humanist lawyer, he broke from the Roman Catholic Church around 1530, and after religious tensions provoked a violent uprising against Protestants in France, Calvin fled to Basel, Switzerland, where he published the first edition of his seminal work Institutes of the Christian Religion in 1536.

Calvin was a tireless polemic and apologetic writer who generated much controversy. He also exchanged cordial and supportive letters with many reformers, including Philipp Melanchthon and Heinrich Bullinger. In addition to the Institutes, he wrote commentaries on most books of the Bible, as well as theological treatises and confessional documents. He regularly preached sermons throughout the week in Geneva. Calvin was influenced by the Augustinian tradition, which led him to expound the doctrine of predestination and the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation.

Calvin’s writing and preachings provided the seeds for the branch of theology that bears his name. The Reformed and Presbyterian churches, which look to Calvin as a chief expositor of their beliefs, have spread throughout the world. 



The Lord’s Prayer

by Thomas Watson

Thomas Watson was an English Puritan who became a well renowned preacher and author during his time, and his writings are still widely read today. As vicar of St. Stephen’s Walbrook, Watson became famous and popular as a preacher until the Restoration, which found him removed from his position. Among his writings are All Things for Good (originally published as A Divine Cordial), The Ten Commandments, and more. 



The Negro in the American Rebellion: His Heroism and His Fidelity

by William W. Brown

This book documents the participation of both free blacks and slaves during the Civil War, as well as a background of African American participation in the Revolution and War of 1812. 
 
From the preface: 
 
“Feeling anxious to preserve for future reference an account of the part which the Negro took in suppressing the Slaveholders’ Rebellion, I have been induced to write this work. In doing so, it occurred to me that a sketch of the condition of the race previous to the commencement of the war would not be uninteresting to the reader. 
For the information concerning the services which the blacks rendered to the Government in the Revolutionary War, I am indebted to the late George Livermore, Esq., whose “Historical Research” is the ablest work ever published on the early history of the negroes of this country. 
In collecting facts connected with the Rebellion, I have availed myself of the most reliable information that could be obtained from newspaper correspondents, as well as from those who were on the battle-field. To officers and privates of several of the colored regiments I am under many obligations for detailed accounts of engagements. 
No doubt, errors in fact and in judgment will be discovered, which I shall be ready to acknowledge, and correct in subsequent editions. The work might have been swelled to double its present size; but I did not feel bound to introduce an account of every little skirmish in which colored men were engaged. 
I waited patiently, before beginning this work, with the hope that some one more competent would take the subject in hand; but, up to the present, it has not been done, although many books have been written upon the Rebellion. 
WILLIAM WELLS BROWN.”



The Silence of God

by Sir Robert Anderson

Sir Robert Anderson was an Assistant Commissioner of the London Metropolitan police, as well as a theologian and writer.  Anderson’s best known works include The Coming Prince and The Silence of God.



The Peasant War

by E. Belfort Bax

Ernest Belfort Bax (23 July 1854 – 26 November 1926) was a British socialist, journalist and philosopher. Born into a nonconformist religious family in Leamington, he was first introduced to Marxism while studying philosophy in Germany. He combined Karl Marx’s ideas with those of Immanuel Kant, Arthur Schopenhauer and Eduard von Hartmann. Keen to explore possible metaphysical and ethical implications of socialism, he came to describe a “religion of socialism” as a means to overcome the dichotomy between the personal and the social, and also that between the cognitive and the emotional. He saw this as a replacement for organised religion, and was a fervent atheist, keen to free workers from what he saw as the moralism of the petty bourgeoisie.

Bax wrote a historical narrative about the Peasants War in Germany, the largest popular uprising in European history aside from the French Revolution). Despite its size, it has mostly been forgotten historically. Friedrich Engels wrote about it in 1850 from a Communist/Socialist perspective, and the Nazis often referenced it. Bax gives a narrative of the battles and individuals involved in the uprising. Bax wrote several books about Socialism and important historical events, including the French Revolution. In The Religion of Socialism, published in 1886, Bax discusses socialism at length in a series of related essays.



Old Greek Stories

by James Baldwin

James Baldwin was self-educated and one of the most prolific writers of school books for children in the 20th century.  



The Honour of His Name

by Sir Robert Anderson

Sir Robert Anderson was an Assistant Commissioner of the London Metropolitan police, as well as a theologian and writer.  Anderson’s best known works include The Coming Prince and The Silence of God.



So You Think You Know: da Vinci and Kabbalah (Volume 1)

by Benjamin Jacob Bloch PhD

Why is this book different from all other books?

Because I guarantee that this book alone can make you an authority. You won’t have to spend 50 years of research (like I did) to expose the secrets of da Vinci and Kabbalah. You won’t have to register for courses or attend lectures. This book, the first in a series, is not filled with the prosaic empty expressions found in other books, but real secrets, for you to use immediately.

Here is a small sample of what is contained within.

There are two famous expressions, one from ancient scripture the other from our modern age; Einstein’s equation energy-mass equation and YHVH in scripture. Do you see their similarity and relationship? View them now in an equivalent but more revealing Divine Duality.

E = cmc is the quantitative and qualitative Einstein equation. Energy is matter enclosed within light, and

Y = HVH as written in scripture.

Have you seen any other book reveal one of its secrets so openly?

Are you now ready to become an immediate authority?



The Saints’ Knowledge of Christ’s Love, or, The Unsearchable Riches of Christ

by John Bunyan

John Bunyan (1628-1688) was an English Christian writer and preacher, famous for writing Pilgrim’s Progress. Though he was a Reformed Baptist, in the Church of England he is remembered with a Lesser Festival on August 30, and on the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church (USA) on August 29.

Bunyan wrote The Pilgrim’s Progress in two parts, the first of which was published in London in 1678 and the second in 1684. He began the work in his first period of imprisonment, and probably finished it during the second. The earliest edition in which the two parts combined in one volume came in 1728. A third part falsely attributed to Bunyan appeared in 1693, and was reprinted as late as 1852. Its full title is The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come.

The Pilgrim’s Progress is arguably one of the most widely known allegories ever written, and has been extensively translated. Protestant missionaries commonly translated it as the first thing after the Bible. At one time, The Pilgrim’s Progress was considered the most widely read and translated book in the English language apart from the Bible.



Journalism for Women: A Practical Guide

by Arnold Bennett

Arnold Bennett was a prolific British writer who penned dozens of works across all genres, from adventurous fiction to propaganda and nonfiction. He wrote plays like Judith and historical novels like Tales of the Five Towns.



The Religion of Socialism: Being Essays in Modern Socialist Criticism

by E. Belfort Bax

Ernest Belfort Bax (23 July 1854 – 26 November 1926) was a British socialist, journalist and philosopher. Born into a nonconformist religious family in Leamington, he was first introduced to Marxism while studying philosophy in Germany. He combined Karl Marx’s ideas with those of Immanuel Kant, Arthur Schopenhauer and Eduard von Hartmann. Keen to explore possible metaphysical and ethical implications of socialism, he came to describe a “religion of socialism” as a means to overcome the dichotomy between the personal and the social, and also that between the cognitive and the emotional. He saw this as a replacement for organised religion, and was a fervent atheist, keen to free workers from what he saw as the moralism of the petty bourgeoisie.

Bax wrote a historical narrative about the Peasants War in Germany, the largest popular uprising in European history aside from the French Revolution). Despite its size, it has mostly been forgotten historically. Friedrich Engels wrote about it in 1850 from a Communist/Socialist perspective, and the Nazis often referenced it. Bax gives a narrative of the battles and individuals involved in the uprising. Bax wrote several books about Socialism and important historical events, including the French Revolution. In The Religion of Socialism, published in 1886, Bax discusses socialism at length in a series of related essays.



A Puritan Catechism with Proofs

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



The Heavenly Footman

by John Bunyan

John Bunyan (1628-1688) was an English Christian writer and preacher, famous for writing Pilgrim’s Progress. Though he was a Reformed Baptist, in the Church of England he is remembered with a Lesser Festival on August 30, and on the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church (USA) on August 29.

Bunyan wrote The Pilgrim’s Progress in two parts, the first of which was published in London in 1678 and the second in 1684. He began the work in his first period of imprisonment, and probably finished it during the second. The earliest edition in which the two parts combined in one volume came in 1728. A third part falsely attributed to Bunyan appeared in 1693, and was reprinted as late as 1852. Its full title is The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come.

The Pilgrim’s Progress is arguably one of the most widely known allegories ever written, and has been extensively translated. Protestant missionaries commonly translated it as the first thing after the Bible. At one time, The Pilgrim’s Progress was considered the most widely read and translated book in the English language apart from the Bible.



The Large Catechism

by Martin Luther

Martin Luther was one of the most influential men of the last millennium, and the man most responsible for the Reformation that split the Catholic Church in the 16th century. A German theologian, Luther wrote at length criticizing the Church and sparked the Reformation, all while being one of the most read authors on the continent in his lifetime. His teachings included important departures from Church dogma, including the claim that absolution of sin could not be purchased. Today his 95 Theses are among the most famous works in the world.



The Persians

by Aeschylus

Along with Sophocles and Euripides, Aeschylus (circa 524-455 B.C.) is one of the triumvirate of Ancient Greek playwrights responsible for much of the establishment of Western drama as it exists today. Aeschylus was the first whose work survived and is credited as the Father of Tragedy, though the other two are probably better known in the West today. He was famous even among his contemporaries; Aristotle mentions how he revolutionized plays by creating more characters and having them interact with each other to produce conflict.

Some of the Ancient Greeks’ most famous characters are famous because of Aeschylus, none more so than Orestes. Aeschylus is believed to have written nearly 100 plays, but less than 10 survived, chief among them being the trilogy known as The Oresteia, consisting of the three tragedies Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers and The Eumenides. He’s also credited for Prometheus Bound, though the authorship of that one is still in dispute. 



The History of Prussia

by John Abbott

John Abbott was one of the best 19th century historians, and he covered everything from antiquity to the modern era in works as varied as The History of Prussia and Kit Carson.

Abbott’s The History of Prussia is a comprehensive history of the kingdom that eventually became the backbone of Germany. As he put it in the preface: 
 
“Prussia is now recognized not only as one of the great powers, but as, probably, the first military power in Europe. The steps by which this greatness has been attained constitute one of the most interesting chapters in the history of modern times. Prussia is the representative, not of liberalism, but of absolutism. It has been under the banner of despotic sway that most of its victories have been achieved. 
 
Prussia now presents to the world the somewhat appalling spectacle of a nation of forty millions, in which every able-bodied man is a trained soldier. It has been able, at a moment’s warning, to send into the field armies so overwhelming in numbers, and so admirably organized and disciplined, as to crush the military power of France, to batter down her strongest fortresses, and even to penetrate the heart of the empire, and invest her proud metropolis with beleaguering hosts. The object of this volume is to give a narrative of the origin, growth, and present condition, of this gigantic power. It would be difficult to find anywhere a theme more full of instructive and exciting incidents.”



St. Francis of Assisi According to Brother Thomas of Celano: His Descriptions of the Seraphic Father, A.D. 1229-1257

by Brother Thomas of Celano

Alongside St. Ignatius, who founded the Jesuits, St. Francis of Assisi is widely regarded as one of the most venerated saints in the Catholic Church due to his work establishing religious Orders that have done an incalculable amount of good and service for societies. Like St. Ignatius, St. Francis also got his start as a soldier who experienced a vision that put him on a more divine path.

St. Francis eventually became a pillar of the Church, both living in poverty to assist those in greatest need and in establishing the Franciscan Order, the Order of Poor Clares, an enclosed order for women, and the Third Order of Brothers and Sisters of Penance. Near the end of his life, he became the first person recorded in history to bear the stigmata, the Passion wounds that Christ suffered in crucifixion, which only added to his ultimate aura and legacy.



The Hand of a Merciful God

by David Ballenger

150 years after the Civil War, stories and tales survive. Libraries are filled with historical documents, manuscripts and photographic images that cover all aspects of the American Civil War. There are thousands of history books and documentaries giving us facts that have been recorded but countless stories have never been recordedâ??personal stories of men who fought and died, stories of men who survived. We don’t know all of their stories; we don’t know the whole story. Yet this is our history and these are our ancestors. To truly understand what drove these men to look into the face of death on a daily basis we must listen to them. But, the time is far past where we could speak to those who knew the truth, who experienced the war. Now we only have the stories from our ancestors as passed down through generations. As decades pass, generations fade, the chances to hear these stories are lost. We are fortunate, however, that many soldiers documented their experiences in letters written to family and friends.

This is one man’s account of the years he spent fighting for the Confederacy. No one better to tell the story than the man who lived it. If we remove our preconceived notions and bias as we read, we can comprehend the struggles that the soldiers went through: the hardships they faced, the missing of family, the loss of friends and the devastation that they saw.



Precious Remedies against Satan’s Devices

by Thomas Brooks

Thomas Brooks was a 17th century English non-conformist Puritan.  Brooks’ book The Mute Christian Under the Smarting Rod discusses his own experience in dealing with temptation and human weakness, and he also wrote about fighting the influence of Satan.



Old Indian Legends

by Zitkala-Sa

Zitkala-Sa was a 19th century Sioux author and activist, and this is a collection of Native American tales he compiled during trips to various reservations. 
  
Among Native American tribes, the Sioux are one of the best known and most important. Participants in some of the most famous and notorious events in American history, the history of the Sioux is replete with constant reminders of the consequences of both their accommodation of and resistance to American incursions into their territory by pioneering white settlers pushing further westward during the 19th century. Some Sioux leaders and their bands resisted incoming whites, while others tried to accommodate them, but the choice often had little impact on the ultimate outcome. Crazy Horse, who was never defeated in battle by U.S. troops, surrendered to them in 1877, only to be bayoneted to death by soldiers attempting to imprison him. Black Kettle, who flew a large American flag from his lodge to indicate his friendship with the white man, was shot to death by soldiers under George Custer’s command in 1868.  
 
Throughout the 19th century, the U.S. government and its officials in the West adopted a policy of dividing the Sioux into two groups: “Treaty Indians” and “Non-treaty Indians.” Often they used these groups against each other or used one group to influence another, but the end was always the same. They were forced off the land where they resided, their populations were decimated by disease, and they were forced onto reservations to adopt lifestyles considered “appropriate” by American standards.   
Despite being some of the most erstwhile foes the U.S. government faced during the Indian Wars, the Sioux and their most famous leaders were grudgingly admired and eventually immortalized by the very people they fought. Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse remain household names due to their leadership of the Sioux at the fateful Battle of the Little Bighorn, where the native warriors wiped out much of George Custer’s 7th Cavalry and inflicted the worst defeat of the Indian Wars upon the U.S. Army. Red Cloud remains a symbol of both defiance and conciliation, resisting the Americans during Red Cloud’s War but also transitioning into a more peaceful life for decades on reservation.



Commentaries on the Laws of England Book 2: The Rights of Things

by William Blackstone

While America’s Founding Fathers looked to various sources for political philosophy, the one they turned to predominantly in the field of law was Sir William Blackstone, a barrister and patron of King George III who set out on writing a comprehensive tome of English Common Law. In addition to being a popular work, the massive 4 book Commentaries on the Laws of England brought together all of England’s legal precedents, allowing others (like the Americans) to rely on it while forming their own judicial codes. Even today, the U.S. Supreme Court frequently cites Blackstone when interpreting the Constitution.

Book 2, titled The Rights of Things, includes 30 chapters and an appendix that analyze property law, and the rights people had over both personal property and land. The chapter cover various topics, including bankruptcy, alienation, gifts, wills, and estate law. It also analyzes the rights people had during England’s feudal times.



Sweet Restorer: A Diary 1864-65 (Expanded, Annotated)

by Elvira J. Powers

Not all of the suffering in the American Civil War was experienced by front-line soldiers. Doctors and nurses shared in what we today call post traumatic stress disorder. Not many of them wrote as eloquently as Elvira Powers.

Having already suffered the death of four children before the war, and with her husband away in the Union army, Elvira Powers headed to the south to work in the Union hospitals.

“‘A hospital is no place to form attachments,’ said one lady in this hospital to another. Perhaps it is not wise to form attachments, but if they grow themselves, as between a mother and sick child, with every cry of pain, or bestowal of attention, what is one to do about it? It happens that my large family of boys, being under the guardianship of their Uncle Sam, are liable at any time to be torn from my maternal oversight.”

Elvira saw and attempted to relive a great deal of suffering of young men torn to pieces by war and sickened by disease. Fortunately for us as readers, she not only wrote her in her journal with a tender, articulate voice, but she relieves us, as she did herself, with great wit and humor throughout.

In 1866, with the war over, she turned her journal into one of the best accounts of combat hospital life ever written.

Every memoir of the American Civil War provides us with another view of the catastrophe that changed the country forever.

For the first time, this long out-of-print volume is available as an affordable, well-formatted book for e-readers and smartphones.

Be sure to LOOK INSIDE by clicking the cover above or download a sample.



An All-Round Ministry: Addresses to Ministers and Students

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



Homily on St. Ignatius

by St. John Chrysostom

John Chrysostom (c. 349-407), Archbishop of Constantinople, was an important Early Church Father. He is known for his eloquence in preaching and public speaking, his denunciation of abuse of authority by both ecclesiastical and political leaders, the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, and his ascetic sensibilities.

St. Ignatius of Antioch, born between 35 and 50 A.D., was an early Christian church father who was martyred in Rome sometime between 98 and 117 A.D. Ignatius referred to himself as Theophorus, which translates as God bearer. He was the Third Bishop of Antioch, and a student of John the Apostle. According to tradition, Ignatius was one of the children Jesus picked up and blessed. 



Fifty Famous People

by James Baldwin

James Baldwin was self-educated and one of the most prolific writers of school books for children in the 20th century.  

This is a collection of stories highlighting the characteristics of some of America’s most famous people, from Abraham Lincoln to Robert E. Lee.



History of Texas from 1685 to 1892: Volume II

by John Henry Brown

John Henry Brown was a 19th century American historian who wrote at length about the Southwest. His most famous work is a multi-volume history of Texas, History of Texas: From 1685 to 1892. Comprised of two volumes, History of Texas  contains 104 chapters.



Aegean Archaeology: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Prehistoric Greece

by H.R. Hall

H.R. Hall was an early 20th century historian who wrote at length about ancient Greece in a number of highly regarded histories, including this one. Aegean Archaeology: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Prehistoric Greece is a thorough overview that includes the original illustrations.



The Oldest Civilization of Greece: Studies of the Mycenaean Age

by H.R. Hall

H.R. Hall was an early 20th century historian who wrote at length about ancient Greece in a number of highly regarded histories, including this one.

From the preface: 

“The series of “Studies of the Mycenæan Age” which are comprised in this volume contain the notes made during the course of some years’ study of the “Mycenæan Question,” expanded and thrown into a connected form. The chief problems of “Mycenæan” archæology are dealt with separately, but at the same time are also, as far as possible, connected in order to form a homogeneous study of the Mycenæan Question as it stands to-day. Here and there it has been found impossible, when discussing some one problem, to steer clear of trenching upon the domain of another; repetition of argument has, however, been as far as possible avoided, and it is hoped that these chapters will be of use both to the scientific archæological student and to the layman who interests himself in the most fascinating search which ever yet allured the seeker after forgotten historyâ??the search for the origins of Greek civilization. 



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