Free biographies and memoirs Kindle books for 20 Dec 15

Hospital Sketches: An Army Nurse’s True Account of Her Experiences during the Civil War

by Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott (1832 – 1888) needs little introduction, as she is one of the most famous American female authors, whose most famous work is Little Women.  She also served as a nurse for six weeks during the Civil War at Union Hospital in Georgetown, and her letters were compiled to create Hospital Sketches.



The Great Charge and Artillery Fighting at Gettysburg

by Edward Porter Alexander

In the narrative of the Civil War, Edward Porter Alexander has loomed larger in death than in life. Just 25 years old when the war broke out, Porter Alexander had already served as an engineer and officer in the U.S. Army, but the native Georgian resigned his commission in May 1861 and joined the Confederacy after his home state seceded. 

Porter Alexander would continue to serve under Longstreet’s corps for most of the rest of the war, and he famously suggested to Lee at Appomattox that the Confederate army should disband and melt away instead of surrender. Porter Alexander would later regret the suggestion, and Lee scolded him for it anyway. 

Though he had served with distinction during the Civil War, it was Porter Alexander’s memoirs that have kept his name alive today. While many prominent officers on both sides wrote memoirs, Porter Alexander’s were among the most insightful and often considered by historians as the most evenhanded. With a sense of humor and a good narrative, Porter Alexander skillfully narrated the war, his service, and what he considered the successes and faults of others, including Lee, when he thought they had made good decisions or mistakes. As a result, historians continue to rely heavily on his memoirs as a source for Civil War history. 



Harold Shipman: The True Story of Britain’s Most Notorious Serial Killer (True Crime, Serial Killers, Murderers)

by Ryan Green

Harold Shipman – The True Story of Britain’s Most Notorious Serial Killer

The man on the cover of this book looks like he could be anyone’s grandfather. It’s easy to imagine him doting on his little grandkids, reading them stories from his lap and letting them play with his big, bushy beard. If you were told he was a doctor, I bet you’d imagine he was a good, kind and gentle one, with an easy, affable manner and deep care for his patients.

Harold Frederick Shipman certainly projected all those qualities, but only so that he could hide the evil that lurked deep inside. Shipman abused his trust and used his position to kill – no less than 218 of his patients found their end at his hand, making him the United Kingdom’s most prolific serial killer by a long shot.

This book tells Shipman’s story, from his childhood under a domineering mother to his pathetic death in a prison cell. It will put you in the perspective of those who lived and worked in proximity to him, showing you the considerate but sometimes haughty doctor he presented himself as before taking you through the process of wrenching off that mask and uncovering the full extent of the evil festering within.

We will make a study of the man’s possible motives and close with a look at the systemic failures that allowed him to kill and steps taken to make sure nothing like his murderous spree ever happens again.

Scroll up and click on the Buy Now button at the top of this page and begin to look into the life and mind of the ultimate human paradox: the healer who kills â??Doctor Death’.



The Hidden Years at Nazareth

by G. Campbell Morgan

G. Campbell Morgan was one of Britain’s foremost Biblical scholars during the early 20th century, and his works on religious topics continue to be widely read today, including this one.



Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign: An Excerpt from Life and Campaigns of Stonewall Jackson

by Robert Lewis Dabney

Robert Lewis Dabney (March 5, 1820 – January 3, 1898) was an American Christian theologian, a Southern Presbyterian pastor, and Confederate Army chaplain best known for being chief of staff to General Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson during his famous Valley Campaign and the Seven Days Battles. He also wrote Life and Campaigns of Stonewall Jackson, an invaluable biography of the general that was published in 1866, just a year after the Civil War had ended.

Stonewall Jackson needs no formal introduction, being one of the most famous generals of the Civil War, revered throughout the South for his extremely successful military skill. At the same time, Jackson’s pious Christianity and seeming eccentricities have continued to fascinate historians, scholars and readers, who often still argue why he would hold his left arm up with his palm facing outward while in battle. 

Jackson earned his famous “stonewall” moniker at the Battle of First Bull Run, when Brigadier-General Bee told his brigade to rally behind Jackson, who was standing like a stone wall. General Bee was mortally wounded shortly after giving the order, so it’s still unclear whether that was a compliment for standing strong or an insult for not moving his brigade, but the nickname stuck for the brigade and the general itself.

Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign is an account of Jackson’s amazing campaign from Dabney’s biography of Jackson. The biography is invaluable not just as a contemporary source but as a study of Lost Cause ideology, coming even before the phrase itself took hold. Dabney’s hatred of the Yankees is evident throughout the book, as is his adulation of Jackson, who comes off as nearly perfect in this book. Slavery is depicted as a benign institution, and the Yankees are treated as inferior in every respect to Southerners. The frequent Lost Cause argument that the South lost only because of inferior manpower and resources can be found in this book, much of which was written before the Confederacy had been defeated. At the same time, Dabney wrote the book to demonstrate the importance of Christianity and its influence on Jackson’s generalship, helping create the image of Confederates as dignified, Christian fighters. The biography will be of interest to anyone interested in Southern attitudes toward the North and the war in the 1860s.



Narrative of William W. Brown, an American Slave

by William W. Brown

This is a slave narrative written in the mid-19th century before the Civil War. 
 
From the preface: 
 
” THE present Narrative was first published in Boston, (U.S.) in July, 1847, and eight thousand copies were sold in less than eighteen months from the time of its publication. This rapid sale may be attributed to the circumstance, that for three years preceding its publication, I had been employed as a lecturing agent by the American Anti-slavery Society; and I was thus very generally known throughout the Free States of the Great Republic, as one who had spent the first twenty years of his life as a slave, in her southern house of bondage. 
In visiting Great Britain I had two objects in view. Firstly, I have been chosen as a delegate by “the American Peace Committee for a Congress of Nations,” to attend the Peace Convention to be held in Paris during the last week of the present month, (August, 1849.) Many of the most distinguished American Abolitionists considered it a triumphant evidence of the progress of their principles, that one of the oppressed coloured race â?? one who is even now, by the constitution of the United States, a slave â?? should have been selected for this honourable office; and were therefore very desirous that I should attend. Secondly, I wished to follow up the work of my friends and fellow-labourers,Charles Lenox Remond and Frederick Douglas, and to lay before the people of Great Britain and Ireland the wrongs that are still committed upon the slaves and the free coloured people of America. The rapid increase of communication between the two sides of the Atlantic has brought them so close together, that the personal intercourse between the British people and American slaveowners is now very great; and the slaveholder, crafty and politic, as deliberate tyrants generally are, rarely leaves the shores of Europe without attempting at least to assuage the prevalent hostility against his beloved “peculiar institution.”



Lucretia Borgia

by Ferdinand Gregorovius

“Lucrezia Borgia is the most unfortunate woman in modern history. Is this because she was guilty of the most hideous crimes, or is it simply because she has been unjustly condemned by the world to bear its curse? The question has never been answeredâ?¦We possess the history of Alexander VI and Cesare, but of Lucrezia Borgia we have little more than a legend, according to which she is a fury, the poison in one hand, the poignard in the other; and yet this baneful personality possessed all the charms and graces.” – Ferdinand Gregorovius 

History remembers Lucrezia Borgia in unflattering terms. She has been portrayed as an incestuous adulteress and a murderer, but her contemporaries thought of her in very different terms. Lucrezia was a political pawn in her father and brother’s plots and a political power in her own right. She was well-educated and well-respected during her lifetime. While she was, in all certainty, a part of multiple political plots, she was also considered to be pious, thoughtful, and mannerly.  

Of course, legends often overtake and overshadow reality. The world has always had a fascination with femme fatales, and few historical women have ever been portrayed as one quite like Lucrezia Borgia. Lucrezia is a baseless, immoral villain in Victor Hugo’s Lucrezia Borgia, and she continues to be depicted as a schemer and manipulator on par with her famous brother and father in film and critically acclaimed television series. Indeed, it would be hard to find another woman in the historical record who is remembered in any way comparable to the legacy of Lucrezia that remains nearly 500 years after her death.  

The great irony is that Lucrezia’s reputation seems to be wildly at odds with the actual woman herself. Though political opponents of the Borgias successfully portrayed Lucrezia as an incestuous schemer, Lucrezia was unusually moral for a powerful woman during the Renaissance. Aside from adultery, hardly unusual in that era, Lucrezia proved to be both an efficient and benevolent ruler when her husband was away from Ferrara, and the two of them had an unusually close and loving relationship in an era where political marriages were made out of convenience, not love.



The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government: Volume I

by Jefferson Davis

Many Southerners and Northerners wrote about the Civil War after it was over, but none of them held as senior a position as Jefferson Davis, the Confederate president. While other generals wrote memoirs that historians still continue to debate about, Davis wrote the most comprehensive tome about the political aspects of the Civil War, particularly his fullthroated defense of the Confederacy’s right to secede.

His memoir, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, is one of the most controversial works to come out of the Civil War.  Volume I explains the political background of the country before the war, as well as his analysis of the Constitution and the right to secede. Volume II picks up where Volume I left off, with the seminal events of 1862 following the secession and the first battles of 1861. Volume II covers everything from 1862 to the end of the war.



General Edward Porter Alexander and the Peninsula Campaign: Account of the Battles from His Memoirs

by Edward Porter Alexander

In the narrative of the Civil War, Edward Porter Alexander has loomed larger in death than in life. Just 25 years old when the war broke out, Porter Alexander had already served as an engineer and officer in the U.S. Army, but the native Georgian resigned his commission in May 1861 and joined the Confederacy after his home state seceded. 

Porter Alexander would continue to serve under Longstreet’s corps for most of the rest of the war, and he famously suggested to Lee at Appomattox that the Confederate army should disband and melt away instead of surrender. Porter Alexander would later regret the suggestion, and Lee scolded him for it anyway. 

Though he had served with distinction during the Civil War, it was Porter Alexander’s memoirs that have kept his name alive today. While many prominent officers on both sides wrote memoirs, Porter Alexander’s were among the most insightful and often considered by historians as the most evenhanded. With a sense of humor and a good narrative, Porter Alexander skillfully narrated the war, his service, and what he considered the successes and faults of others, including Lee, when he thought they had made good decisions or mistakes. As a result, historians continue to rely heavily on his memoirs as a source for Civil War history. 



Tupiniquim Protestant

by Marcos Nóbrega Jr

Thousands of people saw the benefits of faith.

Now through a full version, without academic protocols, originally an adventure through the protest & love.

20 years working hard in the technology industry, I was really lost, a workaholic guy. I discovered the true meaning of life through Jesus.

30 years of church or 20 years of professional experience did not helped me, only the spirit of God speaking through a dream warned me about the urgency to share my thoughts about the true learnings of gospel.

This is an urgent matter, the spirit says to my heart.



Paradise by the Dashboard Light

by Brian Anglin

A young American tries to make sense of love and lust in the back seat of a vintage Mercedes-Benz.



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