Free history Kindle books for 20 Dec 15

On the Priesthood

by St. John Chrysostom

John Chrysostom (c. 349-407), Archbishop of Constantinople, was an important Early Church Father. He is known for his eloquence in preaching and public speaking, his denunciation of abuse of authority by both ecclesiastical and political leaders, the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, and his ascetic sensibilities. After his death (or, according to some sources, during his life) he was given the Greek surname chrysostomos, meaning “golden mouthed”, rendered in English as Chrysostom. The Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches honor him as a saint and count him among the Three Holy Hierarchs, together with Basil the Great and Gregory Nazianzus. He is recognized by the Catholic Church as a saint and as a Doctor of the Church. Churches of the Western tradition, including the Roman Catholic Church, some Anglican provinces, and parts of the Lutheran Church, commemorate him on September 13.

In this work, “On the Priesthood,” St. John Chrysostom is engaged in a dialogue with his friend Basil, who had just accepted the call to the priesthood. St. Chrysostom is seeking to explain to Basil the nature of the dignity of the priestly office. 



The Mute Christian under the Smarting Rod

by Thomas Brooks

Thomas Brooks was a 17th century English non-conformist Puritan.  Brooks’ book The Mute Christian Under the Smarting Rod discusses his own experience in dealing with temptation and human weakness, and he also wrote about fighting the influence of Satan.



Apologia against Those Who Decry Holy Images

by St. John Damascene

Saint John of Damascus, also known as St.John Damascene (c. 676 – 4 December 749) was a Syrian Christian monk and priest. A polymath whose fields of interest and contribution included law, theology, philosophy, and music, before being ordained, he served as a Chief Administrator for the Islamic caliphate in Damascus, wrote works expounding the Christian faith, and composed hymns which are still in everyday use in Eastern Christian monasteries throughout the world. The Catholic Church regards him as a Doctor of the Church, often referred to as the Doctor of the Assumption due to his writings on the Assumption of Mary.

In the early 8th century AD, iconoclasm, a movement seeking to prohibit the veneration of the icons, gained some acceptance in the Byzantine empire. In 726, over the protests of the Patriarch of Constantinople, Emperor Leo III issued his first edict against the veneration of images and their exhibition in public places. A talented writer in the secure surroundings of the caliph’s court, St. John Damascene initiated a defense of holy images in three separate publications. “Apologetic Treatises against those Decrying the Holy Images,” the earliest of these works gained him a reputation. Not only did he attack the emperor, but the use of a simpler literary style brought the controversy to the common people, inciting revolt among those of Christian faith. His writings later played an important role during the Second Council of Nicaea which met to settle the icon dispute. 



Prometheus Bound

by Aeschylus

Along with Sophocles and Euripides, Aeschylus (circa 524-455 B.C.) is one of the triumvirate of Ancient Greek playwrights responsible for much of the establishment of Western drama as it exists today. Aeschylus was the first whose work survived and is credited as the Father of Tragedy, though the other two are probably better known in the West today. He was famous even among his contemporaries; Aristotle mentions how he revolutionized plays by creating more characters and having them interact with each other to produce conflict.

Some of the Ancient Greeks’ most famous characters are famous because of Aeschylus, none more so than Orestes. Aeschylus is believed to have written nearly 100 plays, but less than 10 survived, chief among them being the trilogy known as The Oresteia, consisting of the three tragedies Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers and The Eumenides. He’s also credited for Prometheus Bound, though the authorship of that one is still in dispute. 



History of Greece, Volume 3: From the Age of the Despots to the Western Colonies

by George Grote

George Grote was a 19th century historian who wrote a seminal and comprehensive multi-volume history on Ancient Greece, covering its legendary beginnings and spanning all the way to the end of Greek independence in the last few centuries BCE. His work is a must read for anyone interested in antiquity.



Adoption: The Spirit and the Cry

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



What Shall Be Done for Jesus?

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



A Sermon and a Reminiscence

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



History of Greece, Volume 10: Continuation of Historical Greece

by George Grote

George Grote was a 19th century historian who wrote a seminal and comprehensive multi-volume history on Ancient Greece, covering its legendary beginnings and spanning all the way to the end of Greek independence in the last few centuries BCE. His work is a must read for anyone interested in antiquity.

Volume 10 begins with the peace of Antalcidas to Sicily during the despotism of the elder Dionysius at Syracuse. A table of contents is included for easier navigation through the over 270 pages.



A Wise Desire

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



Commenting & Commentaries

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



What is a Revival?

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



The Existence of God, A Dialogue in Three Chapters

by S.J. Richard F. Clarke

Clarke’s The Existence of God is a dialogue outlining the arguments which prove the existence of God. Structured as a dialogue between the Catholic Saville and the skeptic Cholmeley, the witty prose highlights many of the Christian skeptic’s arguments and their refutations.



The True Estimate of Life and How to Live It

by G. Campbell Morgan

G. Campbell Morgan was one of Britain’s foremost Biblical scholars during the early 20th century, and his works on religious topics continue to be widely read today, including this one.



The Spirit of God

by G. Campbell Morgan

G. Campbell Morgan was one of Britain’s foremost Biblical scholars during the early 20th century, and his works on religious topics continue to be widely read today, including this one.



The Riches of John Bunyan

by John Bunyan

John Bunyan (1628-1688) was an English Christian writer and preacher, famous for writing Pilgrim’s Progress. Though he was a Reformed Baptist, in the Church of England he is remembered with a Lesser Festival on August 30, and on the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church (USA) on August 29.

Bunyan wrote The Pilgrim’s Progress in two parts, the first of which was published in London in 1678 and the second in 1684. He began the work in his first period of imprisonment, and probably finished it during the second. The earliest edition in which the two parts combined in one volume came in 1728. A third part falsely attributed to Bunyan appeared in 1693, and was reprinted as late as 1852. Its full title is The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come.

The Pilgrim’s Progress is arguably one of the most widely known allegories ever written, and has been extensively translated. Protestant missionaries commonly translated it as the first thing after the Bible. At one time, The Pilgrim’s Progress was considered the most widely read and translated book in the English language apart from the Bible.



Barlaam and Josaphat

by St. John Damascene

Saint John of Damascus, also known as St.John Damascene (c. 676 – 4 December 749) was a Syrian Christian monk and priest. A polymath whose fields of interest and contribution included law, theology, philosophy, and music, before being ordained, he served as a Chief Administrator for the Islamic caliphate in Damascus, wrote works expounding the Christian faith, and composed hymns which are still in everyday use in Eastern Christian monasteries throughout the world. The Catholic Church regards him as a Doctor of the Church, often referred to as the Doctor of the Assumption due to his writings on the Assumption of Mary.

Barlaam and Josaphat is a Christianized version of the story of Siddharta Gautama, known around the world today as Buddha. In the Middle Ages the two were treated as Christian saints, being entered in the Greek Orthodox calendar and in the Roman Martyrology in the Western Church as “Barlaam and Josaphat” on the date of 27 November.

According to the legend, King Abenner or Avenier in India persecuted the Christian Church in his realm, founded by the Apostle Thomas. When astrologers predicted that his own son would some day become a Christian, Abenner had the young prince Josaphat isolated from external contact. Despite the imprisonment, Josaphat met the hermit Saint Barlaam and converted to Christianity. Josaphat kept his faith even in the face of his father’s anger and persuasion. 



The Works of Alexander Hamilton: Volume 5

by Alexander Hamilton

Unfortunately, one of the best known aspects of Alexander Hamilton’s (1755-1804) life is the manner in which he died, being shot and killed in a famous duel with Aaron Burr in 1804. But Hamilton became one of the most instrumental Founding Fathers of the United States in that time, not only in helping draft and gain support for the U.S. Constitution but in also leading the Federalist party and building the institutions of the young federal government as Washington’s Secretary of Treasury.

Hamilton is also well remembered for his authorship, along with John Jay and James Madison, of the Federalist Papers. The Federalist Papers sought to rally support for the Constitution’s approval when those three anonymously wrote them, but for readers and scholars today they also help us get into the mindset of the Founding Fathers, including the “Father of the Constitution” himself. They also help demonstrate how men of vastly different political ideologies came to accept the same Constitution.

Hamilton was a prominent politician and a prolific writer who had his hand in everything from the Constitution, the Federalist Papers, and President Washington’s speeches, as well as an influential voice in policy and the formation of initial political parties. His works were compiled into a giant 12 volume series by Henry Cabot, which included everything from his speeches to his private correspondence.  This edition of Hamilton’s Works: Volume 5 includes his writings on Foreign Relations, including discussions about the French Revolution and international diplomacy with European powers



The Holy City

by John Bunyan

John Bunyan (1628-1688) was an English Christian writer and preacher, famous for writing Pilgrim’s Progress. Though he was a Reformed Baptist, in the Church of England he is remembered with a Lesser Festival on August 30, and on the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church (USA) on August 29.

Bunyan wrote The Pilgrim’s Progress in two parts, the first of which was published in London in 1678 and the second in 1684. He began the work in his first period of imprisonment, and probably finished it during the second. The earliest edition in which the two parts combined in one volume came in 1728. A third part falsely attributed to Bunyan appeared in 1693, and was reprinted as late as 1852. Its full title is The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come.

The Pilgrim’s Progress is arguably one of the most widely known allegories ever written, and has been extensively translated. Protestant missionaries commonly translated it as the first thing after the Bible. At one time, The Pilgrim’s Progress was considered the most widely read and translated book in the English language apart from the Bible.



Anti-Duhring, Herr Eugen Duhring’s Revolution in Science

by Friedrich Engels

Friedrich Engels (November 28, 1820 – August 5, 1895) was a German industrialist, social scientist, author, political theorist, philosopher, and father of Marxist theory, working in close collaboration alongside Karl Marx. In 1845, he published The Condition of the Working Class in England, based on personal observations and research. In 1848, he produced with Marx The Communist Manifesto and later he supported Marx financially to do research and write Das Kapital. After Marx’s death Engels edited the second and third volumes. Additionally, Engels organized Marx’s notes on the “Theories of Surplus Value” and this was later published as the “fourth volume” of Capital.

Engels is commonly known as a “ruthless party tactician”, “brutal ideologue”, and “master tactician” when it came to purging rivals in political organizations. However, another strand of Engels’s personality was one of a “gregarious”, “big-hearted”, and “jovial man of outsize appetites”, who was referred to by his son-in-law as “the great beheader of champagne bottles.” 

Anti-Dühring, Herr Eugen Dühring’s Revolution in Science is a detailed critique of the philosophical positions of Eugen Dühring, a German philosopher and critic of Marxism. In the course of replying to Dühring, Engels reviews recent advances in science and mathematics and seeks to demonstrate the way in which the concepts of dialectics apply to natural phenomena. Many of these ideas were later developed in the unfinished work, Dialectics of Nature. The last section of Anti-Dühring was later edited and published under the separate title, Socialism: Utopian and Scientific. 



Confederate Military History: Stonewall Jackson’s Valley Campaign of 1862

by Clement A. Evans

Confederate Military History is a 12-volume series of books written and/or edited by former Confederate general Clement A. Evans that deals with specific topics related to the military personalities, places, battles, and campaigns in various Southern United States, including those of the Confederacy.

Written with a heavy Southern slant, the articles that comprise the compendium deal with the famous events of the war. This account is of Stonewall Jackson’s famous 1862 campaign in the Shenandoah Valley, where Jackson’s “foot cavalry” marched 650 miles in less than 50 days while keeping 3 Union armies bottled up in the Shenandoah Valley. Jackson’s success kept the Lincoln Administration nervous enough to keep 50,000 men near Washington D.C. instead of allowing them to join McClellan’s Army of the Potomac during the Peninsula Campaign. Jackson then rejoined the Army of Northern Virginia and its new commander, Robert E. Lee, in time to participate in the Seven Days Battles that pushed McClellan’s army back. 



Confederate Military History: The Seven Days Battles Before Richmond

by Clement A. Evans

Confederate Military History is a 12-volume series of books written and/or edited by former Confederate general Clement A. Evans that deals with specific topics related to the military personalities, places, battles, and campaigns in various Southern United States, including those of the Confederacy.

Written with a heavy Southern slant, the articles that comprise the compendium deal with the famous events of the war. This account is of the Seven Days Battles. The Seven Days Battles was a series of six major battles over the seven days from June 25 to July 1, 1862, near Richmond, Virginia during the American Civil War. Confederate General Robert E. Lee drove the invading Union Army of the Potomac, commanded by Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan, away from Richmond and into a retreat down the Virginia Peninsula. The series of battles is sometimes known erroneously as the Seven Days Campaign, but it was actually the culmination of the Peninsula Campaign, not a separate campaign in its own right.



The Articles of Confederation of the United Colonies of New England, 1643

by Anonymous

The United Colonies of New England, commonly known as the New England Confederation, was a short-lived military alliance of the English colonies of Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut, and New Haven. Established in 1643, its primary purpose was to unite the Puritan colonies against the Native Americans. It was established as a direct result of a war which started between the Mohegan and Narragansetts. Its charter provided for the return of fugitive criminals and indentured servants, and served as a forum for resolving inter-colonial disputes. In practice, none of the goals were accomplished. The confederation was weakened in 1654 after Massachusetts refused to join the war against the Netherlands during the First Anglo-Dutch War. However the confederation regained importance during King Philip’s War in 1676.



The Libation Bearers

by Aeschylus

Along with Sophocles and Euripides, Aeschylus (circa 524-455 B.C.) is one of the triumvirate of Ancient Greek playwrights responsible for much of the establishment of Western drama as it exists today. Aeschylus was the first whose work survived and is credited as the Father of Tragedy, though the other two are probably better known in the West today. He was famous even among his contemporaries; Aristotle mentions how he revolutionized plays by creating more characters and having them interact with each other to produce conflict.

Some of the Ancient Greeks’ most famous characters are famous because of Aeschylus, none more so than Orestes. Aeschylus is believed to have written nearly 100 plays, but less than 10 survived, chief among them being the trilogy known as The Oresteia, consisting of the three tragedies Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers and The Eumenides. He’s also credited for Prometheus Bound, though the authorship of that one is still in dispute. 



The Greek Revolution

by John Lord

The Greek War of Independence was fought against the occupying Ottoman Turks from 1821-1832.  Started in part by the Filiki Eteria movement in Greece, uprising 1821 soon lead to a full scale war.  By 1828, France, Russia, and the United Kingdom pledged their support to Greece and helped defeat the Turks. In 1832, Greece was recognized as an independent country.  Greek Independence day is celebrated on March 25th. Lord’s piece on the Greek Revolution provides a brief history of the events of the revolution.



The Charter of the Dutch West India Company

by Various Authors

The Dutch West India Company was chartered by the Republic of the Netherlands and given monopoly over trade in the West Indies.  The company was instrumental in setting up the first Dutch colonies in North America, such as New Amsterdam ( present day New York).



The Peace Treaties of Westphalia

by Various Authors

The Peace of Westphalia was a series of peace treaties signed between May and October of 1648 in Osnabrück and Münster. These treaties ended the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648) in the Holy Roman Empire, and the Eighty Years’ War (1568-1648) between Spain and the Dutch Republic.
The Westphalia treaties involved the Holy Roman Emperor, Ferdinand III of the House of Habsburg, the Kingdoms of Spain, France, Sweden, the Dutch Republic, the Princes of the Holy Roman Empire, and sovereigns of the Free imperial cities and can be denoted by two major events.

  • The signing of the Peace of Münster between the Dutch Republic and the Kingdom of Spain on 30 January 1648, officially ratified in Münster on 15 May 1648.
  • The signing of two complementary treaties on 24 October 1648, namely:
  • The Treaty of Münster (Instrumentum Pacis Monasteriensis, IPM), concerning the Holy Roman Emperor and France and their respective allies.

The Treaty of Osnabrück (Instrumentum Pacis Osnabrugensis, IPO), concerning the Holy Roman Emperor, the Empire and Sweden and their respective allies.



Seven Against Thebes

by Aeschylus

Along with Sophocles and Euripides, Aeschylus (circa 524-455 B.C.) is one of the triumvirate of Ancient Greek playwrights responsible for much of the establishment of Western drama as it exists today. Aeschylus was the first whose work survived and is credited as the Father of Tragedy, though the other two are probably better known in the West today. He was famous even among his contemporaries; Aristotle mentions how he revolutionized plays by creating more characters and having them interact with each other to produce conflict.

Some of the Ancient Greeks’ most famous characters are famous because of Aeschylus, none more so than Orestes. Aeschylus is believed to have written nearly 100 plays, but less than 10 survived, chief among them being the trilogy known as The Oresteia, consisting of the three tragedies Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers and The Eumenides. He’s also credited for Prometheus Bound, though the authorship of that one is still in dispute. 



Malachi’s Message to the Men of Today

by G. Campbell Morgan

G. Campbell Morgan was one of Britain’s foremost Biblical scholars during the early 20th century, and his works on religious topics continue to be widely read today, including this one.



Commentaries on the Laws of England Book 1: The Rights of Persons

by William Blackstone

While America’s Founding Fathers looked to various sources for political philosophy, the one they turned to predominantly in the field of law was Sir William Blackstone, a barrister and patron of King George III who set out on writing a comprehensive tome of English Common Law. In addition to being a popular work, the massive 4 book Commentaries on the Laws of England brought together all of England’s legal precedents, allowing others (like the Americans) to rely on it while forming their own judicial codes. Even today, the U.S. Supreme Court frequently cites Blackstone when interpreting the Constitution.

Book 1 of Blackstone’s Commentaries looks at the rights of people, covering all kinds of relationships, including between married couples, parents and children, guardianship, and even corporations.



The World’s Famous Orations: Volume VII, Continental Europe (380-1906)

by William Jennings Bryan

William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was a tour de force in American politics around the end of the 19th century. Bryan had a long, distinguished career in politics as a liberal in the Democratic Party, including serving as Secretary of State and presidential candidate. He advocated for democracy, sought peace, and embraced evolution even while opposing the idea of Social Darwinism. Bryan came to be known as “The Great Commoner.”.

Bryan gave 500 speeches in his life and all but invented the idea of stumping for president, so who better than the brilliant, eloquent statesman to edit a compilation of the world’s most famous orations? Bryan covered the most famous speeches given by the most famous people in Western civilization from Ancient Greece to contemporary times. The World’s Famous Orations include speeches from the likes of Socrates, Cicero, Caesar, Antony, Sir Walter Raleigh, Oliver Cromwell, Tecumseh, Ben Franklin, Patrick Henry, Abraham Lincoln, and many more. In all, Bryan included 281 speeches by 213 speakers. Chosen by the best orator of his age, the orations offer readers a glimpse into history’s turning points as well as being a fantastic reference point.



Commentaries on the Laws of England Book 4: Of Public Wrongs

by William Blackstone

While America’s Founding Fathers looked to various sources for political philosophy, the one they turned to predominantly in the field of law was Sir William Blackstone, a barrister and patron of King George III who set out on writing a comprehensive tome of English Common Law. In addition to being a popular work, the massive 4 book Commentaries on the Laws of England brought together all of England’s legal precedents, allowing others (like the Americans) to rely on it while forming their own judicial codes. Even today, the U.S. Supreme Court frequently cites Blackstone when interpreting the Constitution.

In Book 4, titled Of Public Wrongs, Blackstone looks at all sorts of crimes, including the elements necessary for each crime and the legal procedures that were used in criminal trials. This book was critical for explaining concepts still taught in law school today, like intent, accessories, and principals.



All Things New: A Message to the New Converts

by G. Campbell Morgan

G. Campbell Morgan was one of Britain’s foremost Biblical scholars during the early 20th century, and his works on religious topics continue to be widely read today, including this one.



A History of Modern Europe from the Fall of Constantinople to the War of Crimea A.D. 1453-1900, Volume I: 1453-1525

by Thomas Henry Dyer

Thomas Henry Dyer’s A History of Modern Europe from the Fall of Constantinople to the War of Crimea A.D. 1453-1900 is an expansive, six volume  history of Western Europe. Volume I discusses the affairs of Western Europe from 1452-1525 A.D., including events such as the Spanish Inquisition and the rise of Martin Luther.



Predestination Calmly Considered

by John Wesley

John Wesley, along with his brother Charles, is credited with the founding of the Methodist movement. 



John Ploughman’s Talk: Plain Advice for Plain People

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



George Rogers Clark’s Memoir: The Conquest of the Illinois

by George Rogers Clark

Lieutenant-Colonel George Rogers Clark was a war hero during the Revolutionary War, when in 1778 reduced the Illinois, and early in 1779 captured Lieutenant-Governor Henry Hamilton and his force at Vincennes upon the Wabash.



European Hero Stories

by E.M. Tappan

E.M. Tappan was an American schoolteacher who wrote a number of books about the history of Europe and histories of the folklore that was cultivated across the continent.

European Hero Stories covers both famous folk tales and historic events, such as Alaric’s sack of Rome.



The Eumenides

by Aeschylus

Along with Sophocles and Euripides, Aeschylus (circa 524-455 B.C.) is one of the triumvirate of Ancient Greek playwrights responsible for much of the establishment of Western drama as it exists today. Aeschylus was the first whose work survived and is credited as the Father of Tragedy, though the other two are probably better known in the West today. He was famous even among his contemporaries; Aristotle mentions how he revolutionized plays by creating more characters and having them interact with each other to produce conflict.

Some of the Ancient Greeks’ most famous characters are famous because of Aeschylus, none more so than Orestes. Aeschylus is believed to have written nearly 100 plays, but less than 10 survived, chief among them being the trilogy known as The Oresteia, consisting of the three tragedies Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers and The Eumenides. He’s also credited for Prometheus Bound, though the authorship of that one is still in dispute. 



Life Problems

by G. Campbell Morgan

G. Campbell Morgan was one of Britain’s foremost Biblical scholars during the early 20th century, and his works on religious topics continue to be widely read today, including this one.



The Red Record: Tabulated Statistics and Alleged Causes of Lynching in the United States

by Ida B. Wells

Ida B. Wells was an early 20th century writer who documented some of the effects of Jim Crow in the South at a time when segregation was the norm there.



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