Free literary fiction Kindle books for 21 Dec 15

Damn, Girl. That Sucks.

by Mary Kate Kopec

When everything going all wrong might just be everything going all right â?¦

Ivy Baines, an aspiring playwright, has been up against it in her life. She has learned to bounce back and keep on going. But this next week might just do her in. Her whole life â?¦ everything she has worked for â?¦ it all crumbles. If Ivy can tell you anything, it’s that mean people really do suck.

Mary Kate Kopec brings you her latest in a humorous, heartwarming, tug-on-your-heartstrings story about when life gets hard, the friends who are there to catch you when you fall, and the men who make it messy â?¦ or sometimes, even â?¦ special.



Alcatraz

by Max Brand

Max Brand was the pen name of American author Frederick Schiller Faust.  Brand was best known for writing Western novels, and many films have been adapted based on his stories.



Little Red Riding Drawers

by Devlin O’Neill

Who is Pieter Lupus? Of more importance to Deepa Pryor-Nodiss, what is Lupus, and how will he impact her safe and sane but very uneventful life? Devlin O’Neill’s newest heroine is a red-headed minx looking for adventure. She finds all she can manage and more when she runs headlong into someone who is either her worst nightmare or her dream come true. Which will the mysterious stranger prove to be, and — just as important for O’Neill fans — how will he establish his role in the life of the headstrong young woman who is unwittingly begging for his guiding hand? This fantasy novella will answer all these questions and much more.



Cast Upon the Breakers

by Jr. Horatio Alger

If you’ve ever used the phrase “rags to riches,” you owe that to Horatio Alger, Jr. (1832-1899), who popularized the idea through his fictional writings that also served as a theme for the way America viewed itself as a country. Alger’s works about poor boys rising to better living conditions through hard work, determination, courage, honesty, and morals was popular with both adults and younger readers.

Alger’s writings happened to correspond with America’s Gilded Age, a time of increasing prosperity in a nation rebuilding from the Civil War. His lifelong theme of rags to riches continued to gain popularity but has gradually lessened since the 1920s. Still, readers today often come across Ragged Dick and stories like it in school.



Revenants

by Daniel Mills

The year is 1689. Situated on the northern boundary of the Massachusetts Bay colony, the town of Cold Marsh is a place of secrets, a village characterized by repression and guilt. Fourteen years have passed since the outbreak of King Philip’s War. During that summer, the men of Cold Marsh surrounded and destroyed a nearby Native American encampment, massacring the inhabitants. Now darkness has come to the village. Two of the town’s young women have vanished under mysterious circumstances, and the country seethes with rumors of witchcraft and devilry. Even their God has abandoned them. When a third young woman disappears, the men of the village determine to leave the safety of the village and enter the other world of the woods in search of her, each man haunted by the Jack o’ lanthorn of his own unspeakable secrets.

Revenants is a lyrical evocation of the colonial landscape, a poetic meditation on the hills and wilds of that vanished country. It also brings back to life, with breathing intimacy, the inner landscape of sombre repression known to the settlers of New England. In the words of H.P. Lovecraft: “Divorced from the enlightenment of civilization, the strength of these Puritans turned into singular channels; and in their isolation, morbid self-repression, and struggle for life with relentless Nature, there came to them dark furtive traits from the prehistoric depths of their cold Northern heritageâ?¦ Erring as all mortals must, they were forced by their rigid code to seek concealment above all else; so that they came to use less and less taste in what they concealed.”



Paul Prescott’s Charge

by Jr. Horatio Alger

If you’ve ever used the phrase “rags to riches,” you owe that to Horatio Alger, Jr. (1832-1899), who popularized the idea through his fictional writings that also served as a theme for the way America viewed itself as a country. Alger’s works about poor boys rising to better living conditions through hard work, determination, courage, honesty, and morals was popular with both adults and younger readers.

Alger’s writings happened to correspond with America’s Gilded Age, a time of increasing prosperity in a nation rebuilding from the Civil War. His lifelong theme of rags to riches continued to gain popularity but has gradually lessened since the 1920s. Still, readers today often come across Ragged Dick and stories like it in school.



A New Kind of Zeal 2: The Price of Redemption

by Michelle Warren

A New Kind of Zeal: The Price of Redemption is the sequel to A New Kind of Zeal

Three months have passed since Tristan Blake confronted Joshua Davidson, between the Beehive and Saint Peter’s Cathedral. The Governor General Anita Mayes has taken direct control of New Zealand, sending the humiliated Prime Minister James Connor to the back benches of the New Conservative Party. Rachel Connor has taken up work at Hardwater Hospital in Wellington, while John Robertson, her husband, is spending more and more time in the Cathedral. The Bishop, Mark Blake, has been laid off for improper conduct, but the Anglican Archbishop has chosen to reinstate him.

Selena Blake is reconciled to her father, but hasn’t begun to come to terms with her part in the events of Joshua Davidson.

Alex Kensington remains hidden, disguised behind all the others. He is the key: the mastermind behind Joshua’s demise. But the driving force behind Alex is the spirit of his father: a man who will never be appeased until he achieves, through Alex, total control of New Zealand.

Rau Petera has good news to bring, on the shores of Oriental Bay. But Aotearoa is uneasy: independence has been taken under siege. A new election must take place, formed by the Governor General, but Alex’s father Kensington is moving into position.

Who will rule New Zealand? What forces, in the struggle for independence, will win?



The Man in the Room

by Dennis Ruane

When Saint Mathew’s High School is slated for demolition, irreverent, lovelorn, Duane Ryan journeys to Homewood, Pennsylvania to see his alma mater one last time. Struggling with alcoholism, burdened with negativism, Duane immerses himself in scenes and personalities from his past, hoping to find inspiration to restart an art career that has been stalled for years.

While reliving his school days and reminiscing about the wayward path he has followed in the decades since, the artist becomes involved with an enigmatic woman who revives questions about his past and brings him into conflict with his high school nemesis, Father Thomas McGee. Confrontation with the priest uncovers a startling mystery, the unraveling of which leads Duane to a new perspective on his career and ultimately changes the course of his life.



Got a new Kindle or know someone who has? Check out the ultimate guide to finding free books for your Kindle. Also available in the UK.