Free biographies and memoirs Kindle books for 23 Dec 15

Life Takes Guts

by Sue Hurley

Life Takes Guts is my story about the tragedies I’ve experienced and come through that have made me a better person. With determination, courage, faith and a never give up spirit, I am proud of who I have become today. Because of that fact, I was able to overcome all odds that may have caused many to give up and quit.

My story took a sharp life turn when I was two years old. Tragically, I lost my father in an automobile accident. Soon afterward, my grief stricken mother met a man who wined her and dined her, primarily for her insurance money. I was four when this same man was brought into my life as my stepfather. He abused me emotionally, sexually, physically and mentally from that day until I was sixteen.

I was removed from our home by authorities and placed into two different foster homes during my senior year of high school. Found myself pregnant at eighteen by a man I loved, yet had no idea he was married. At nineteen I became a mother to my daughter, Hannah. Sadly, at twenty-one I became pregnant by another man I barely knew and gave that child up for adoption at birth.

When Hannah was seven, I married. The only problem was at the time I had no idea he was an alcoholic. He was abusive physically, mentally and emotionally. During the years of our marriage, I had two sons, Kenneth and Michael. After ten years of listening to his empty promises to get sober, I finally had the courage to leave. Thank God I did, for my children and myself.

After that time, I traveled around Michigan while working for a National Food Service Management Company. Later in Reno, Nevada, I worked various jobs while supporting my two children. After being terminated from a good job while trying to buy a home, I made the decision to move to Hawaii, land of paradise, on New Year’s Eve in 1979, and start a new life in paradise with my youngest, Michael who was eight. Kenneth was visiting his father in Michigan at that time.

In Hawaii, I rented a five bedroom house and was able to make the monthly payment by renting out the extra bedrooms. I followed my Grandmother’s example of how she managed with six children. Eventually, I was able to buy that house, including the ground lease. After it appreciated in value, I started a short term rental business in Waikiki by purchasing two one bedroom units. That soon grew from two into eight units total.

I was the first Caucasian (Haole) who was hired by the Department of Education Food Service Department in Hawaii.

This is the story of hardships suffered and extreme challenges I faced during the course of my life. And how, by the grace of God, I was able to pull through and come out on the other side.

Remember, God will never give us more than we can handle. Let your feet hit the floor every day and trust Him to do the rest. I hope my story will serve as an inspiration to others who may find themselves in seemingly unbearable situations as I once did. I am here to tell you, there is hope for a better day, if you will allow yourself to believe and make that decision to move forward, day by day. I am here, as living proof that it can be done.

Mahalo Nui Loa,

Thank you very much, Sue Hurley



Plutarch’s Lives: Life of Alexander the Great

by Plutarch

Plutarch was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist known primarily for his Parallel Lives and Moralia. Thanks to his writings and lectures Plutarch became a celebrity in the Roman Empire. At his country estate, guests from all over the empire congregated for serious conversation, presided over by Plutarch in his marble chair. Many of these dialogues were recorded and published, and the 78 essays and other works which have survived are now known collectively as the Moralia.

Plutarch’s best-known work is the Parallel Lives, a series of biographies of famous Greeks and Romans, arranged in pairs to illuminate their common moral virtues and vices. The surviving Lives contain 23 pairs, each with one Greek Life and one Roman Life, as well as four unpaired single Lives. Some of the Lives, such as those of Heracles, Philip II of Macedon and Scipio Africanus, no longer exist; many of the remaining Lives are truncated, contain obvious lacunae or have been tampered with by later writers. Extant Lives include those on Aristides, Pericles, Pompey, Julius Caesar, Cicero, Cato the Younger, Mark Antony, and Marcus Junius Brutus.

Plutarch also wrote a series of biographies, including the biographies of Demetrius, Pyrrhus, Agis and Cleomenes, Aratus and Artaxerxes, Philopoemen, Camillus, Marcellus, Flamininus, Aemilius Paulus, Galba and Otho. 



Germania

by Tacitus

Tacitus is one of the most famous Roman historians. Tacitus is best known for The Annals and Histories, covering the history of Ancient Rome in very minute detail, but he also wrote Germania, a fascinating description of the Germanic people as seen from the Roman point of view circa 100 A.D.



Plutarch’s Lives: Life of Alcibiades

by Plutarch

Plutarch was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist known primarily for his Parallel Lives and Moralia. Thanks to his writings and lectures Plutarch became a celebrity in the Roman Empire. At his country estate, guests from all over the empire congregated for serious conversation, presided over by Plutarch in his marble chair. Many of these dialogues were recorded and published, and the 78 essays and other works which have survived are now known collectively as the Moralia.

Plutarch’s best-known work is the Parallel Lives, a series of biographies of famous Greeks and Romans, arranged in pairs to illuminate their common moral virtues and vices. The surviving Lives contain 23 pairs, each with one Greek Life and one Roman Life, as well as four unpaired single Lives. Some of the Lives, such as those of Heracles, Philip II of Macedon and Scipio Africanus, no longer exist; many of the remaining Lives are truncated, contain obvious lacunae or have been tampered with by later writers. Extant Lives include those on Aristides, Pericles, Pompey, Julius Caesar, Cicero, Cato the Younger, Mark Antony, and Marcus Junius Brutus.

Plutarch also wrote a series of biographies, including the biographies of Demetrius, Pyrrhus, Agis and Cleomenes, Aratus and Artaxerxes, Philopoemen, Camillus, Marcellus, Flamininus, Aemilius Paulus, Galba and Otho. 



Battles & Leaders of the Civil War: General William B. Franklin’s Notes of the Maryland Campaign

by William B. Franklin

William Buel Franklin (February 27, 1823 – March 8, 1903) was a career United States Army officer and a Union Army general in the American Civil War. He rose to the rank of a corps commander in the Army of the Potomac, fighting in several notable early battles in the Eastern Theater. Franklin was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers but quickly rose from brigade to corps command in the Army of the Potomac, seeing action in the Peninsula Campaign, the Battle of Antietam, and the Battle of Fredericksburg. At Antietam, his VI Corps was in reserve and he tried in vain to convince Maj. Gen. Edwin V. Sumner to allow his corps to exploit a weakened position in the Confederate center.

Franklin’s notes of the Maryland Campaign were included as part of the well known Battles & Leaders of the Civil War Series, offering a primary account of the events leading up to the Battle of Antietam and including some of the correspondence among the Lincoln Administration’s top officials in the War Department. 



Parallel Lives: Comparison of Poplicola with Solon

by Plutarch

Plutarch was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist known primarily for his Parallel Lives and Moralia. Thanks to his writings and lectures Plutarch became a celebrity in the Roman Empire. At his country estate, guests from all over the empire congregated for serious conversation, presided over by Plutarch in his marble chair. Many of these dialogues were recorded and published, and the 78 essays and other works which have survived are now known collectively as the Moralia.

Plutarch’s best-known work is the Parallel Lives, a series of biographies of famous Greeks and Romans, arranged in pairs to illuminate their common moral virtues and vices. The surviving Lives contain 23 pairs, each with one Greek Life and one Roman Life, as well as four unpaired single Lives. Some of the Lives, such as those of Heracles, Philip II of Macedon and Scipio Africanus, no longer exist; many of the remaining Lives are truncated, contain obvious lacunae or have been tampered with by later writers. Extant Lives include those on Aristides, Pericles, Pompey, Julius Caesar, Cicero, Cato the Younger, Mark Antony, and Marcus Junius Brutus.

Plutarch also wrote a series of biographies, including the biographies of Demetrius, Pyrrhus, Agis and Cleomenes, Aratus and Artaxerxes, Philopoemen, Camillus, Marcellus, Flamininus, Aemilius Paulus, Galba and Otho. 



If you want to run far, run together (The diary of an average runner Book 2)

by Mark Cameron

Exercise is not an activity for me, it’s part of my life, just as work is. I get annoyed with myself if I take the long route around the house when getting ready to go out, backtracking is like rework to me, it annoys me loads and I end up questioning how I can be better next time. My book not only covers my running, but also how it links with my continuous improvement day job, the two merge into just the way I live my life.

The follow up to my first book, the best selling “Diary of an average runner: Never, ever, give up”, this is the story of my comeback from the injury which sadly ended 2014 for me, and the fabulous opportunities that came as a result of this. This book does not just focus on running, I also cycled, I ate cake, I met friends, I visited new places, I had holidays; and I worked; these are all in the book.

My story is not unique, I’ve met many great people through my life who have done far greater things than me, they have inspired me and motivated me to push myself out of my own comfort zone. I hope as you read this you will see some of yourself in this book, to maybe have a laugh at my expense, to look at and question yourself a little and think “why?”

I really hope you enjoy reading this book as I enjoyed living it.

Thank you .

Mark



Battles & Leaders of the Civil War: Hand-To-Hand Fighting at Spotsylvania

by G. Norton Galloway

George Norton Galloway 1841-1904) was a Union soldier with the 95th Pennsylvania who fought during the Overland Campaign. As Commanding General of the United States Army from 1864 to 1865, Ulysses S. Grant confronted Robert E. Lee in a series of very high casualty battles known as the Overland Campaign that ended in a stalemate siege at Petersburg. During the siege, Grant coordinated a series of devastating campaigns launched by William Tecumseh Sherman, Philip Sheridan, and George Thomas. Finally breaking through Lee’s trenches at Petersburg, the Army of the Potomac captured Richmond, the Confederate capital, in April 1865. Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox. Soon after, the Confederacy collapsed and the Civil War ended.

After the war, Galloway wrote an account of the hand to hand fighting at Spotsylvania Court House, some of the bloodiest fighting of the war. The fighting took place due to a salient in the Confederates’ line that became known as the “Bloody Angle.” Galloway’s account became part of the well known Battles & Leaders series, full of primary accounts by the Civil War’s soldiers. 



Battles & Leaders of the Civil War: Meade at Gettysburg

by Francis A. Walker

George Gordon Meade (December 31, 1815 – November 6, 1872) was a career United States Army officer and civil engineer. During the Civil War he served as a Union general, rising from command of a brigade to command of the Army of the Potomac just days before the Battle of Gettysburg. Naturally, he is best known for defeating Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia at Gettysburg in July 1863.

Meade’s Civil War combat experience started as a brigade commander in the Peninsula Campaign and the Seven Days Battles. As a division commander he had notable success at the Battle of South Mountain and assumed temporary corps command at the Battle of Antietam after “Fighting Joe” Hooker was injured in the morning of the Battle. His division was arguably the most successful during the assaults at the Battle of Fredericksburg.
In 1864-65, Meade continued to command the Army of the Potomac through the Overland Campaign, the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign, and the Appomattox Campaign, but he was overshadowed by the direct supervision of the general in chief, Ulysses S. Grant, who accompanied him throughout these campaigns. He also suffered from a reputation as a man of short, violent temper who was hostile toward the press and received hostility in return. After the war he commanded several important departments during Reconstruction.

In one of the articles from the well known Battles & Leaders series, General Francis A. Walker wrote an account of Meade’s experience and actions during the Battle of Gettysburg. This edition of Meade at Gettysburg is specially formatted with pictures of Gettysburg’s important commanders.



Battles & Leaders of the Civil War: General Jacob D. Cox at Antietam

by Jacob D. Cox

Jacob Dolson Cox, (Jr.) (October 27, 1828 – August 4, 1900) was a Union Army general during the American Civil War, and later a Republican politician from Ohio. At the beginning of the Maryland Campaign, Cox’s brigade became the Kanawha Division of the IX Corps of the Army of the Potomac. When corps commander Maj. Gen. Jesse L. Reno was killed at the Battle of South Mountain, Cox assumed command of the IX Corps. He suggested to Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside, formally the commander of IX Corps, but who was commanding a two-corps “wing” of the Army, that he be allowed to return to division command, which was more in keeping with his level of military expertise. Burnside refused the suggestion, but at the Battle of Antietam, kept Cox under his supervision. The poor showing of the corps around “Burnside Bridge” at Antietam is generally attributed to Burnside, not Cox.

Cox’s account of the Battle of Antietam, part of the well known Battles & Leaders of the Civil War Series, discusses the strategy and tactics of the battle, as well as the controversy over whether McClellan should have chased the retreating Army of Northern Virginia after the battle. 



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