Free history Kindle books for 24 Dec 15

SIGHT FROM ABOVE: Amazing photos book: The Holy Land: Discover the Great Sites of History from the Air – Included the sites for Christian holy places- Christian book, Tourist & Travel guide book

by Avi Hartmann

SIGHT FROM ABOVE

Sight From Above invites you to take a new look at the land of Israel and its beautiful views and holy sites from a different perspective

For thousands of years, it was a desired location for great empires, and many different cultures passed through this place. The spiritual essence of the large Monotheistic religions was created here. It is Christ’s birthplace, he who introduced morality, equality and grace to the world. The fascinating story of two-thousand years worth of History is brought here in an enlightening sense. The book entices curiosity with its beautifully written stories and alluring images.

The land of Israel and its holy sites are shown in this book in all their grandeur, grace and beauty, in the Sight From Above.



The First Christmas

by Yashi Nozawa

A non-fiction brief history of Christmas and associated interesting problems. The author treated the subject as a simple historical event of his research object, so this book is not a religious book as its title might suggest. The first chapter focuses on discovering the origin of a Christmas celebration as a religious ritual. This simple task was involved finding answers to several important questions, such as when and where Jesus born? When and which church officials decided the date of Christmas? Did they select the correct date? If not, then what date and for what reason did they choose it? Once the first Christmas question is settled in chapter one, the following four chapters deal with the questions of when, where, and who did perform the first Christmas celebration in America. Again the simple inquiry leads us to a tangled web of the incomplete history of many earlier explorers and settlers. It includes the history of European explorers and their mutual conflicts in the period after the discovery of America by Columbus but before the Puritans’ landing on Plymouth Rock. This book also describes Leif Erikson’s North American settlement and related questions about its exact location. Probably the most intriguing subject is the possibility of pre-Columbian European settlers within the confines of the continental United States. Speculation about the existence of these unconfirmed settlements was triggered by the discovery of several rune-stones, which carried the inscription of rune alphabets, Norsemen’s written language. In the last two chapters, the author describes the Japanese Christmas celebration as an example of Christmas in a non-Christian country. Since Japan is the author’s native country, he has observed the evolution of Christmas there throughout the past sixty plus years since the end of World War II. It was refreshingly interesting compared to the traditional Japanese activities during the month of December.



The Gévaudan Tragedy: The Disastrous Campaign of a Deported ‘Beast’

by Karl-Hans Taake

In the 1760s, in the former County of Gévaudan, located in southern France, and in adjacent areas, about one hundred children, youths, and women were killed by an alien “beast”; numerous other humans survived the attacks, many of them seriously injured. The series of attacks is confirmed by a great variety of historical documents and is not called into question by scientists. The “beast” showed an unusual behaviour, extremely threatening for the rural communities of Gévaudan: it ambushed humans not only on pastures and in fields, but even entered villages to prey on inhabitants in front of their houses. The appearance of the “beast” also had economically dramatic consequences for the already impoverished region: trade nearly came to a standstill, fields were no longer tilled. Historians dealing with the events conclude that wolves or a hybrid of a domestic dog and a wolf caused the attacks. But this view is not consistent with reports of the attacked persons and of those who rushed to help them or pursued the “beast”. Furthermore, the wolf hypothesis is not compatible with zoological facts. This book traces the story of the “beast” and its victims; it deals extensively with the identity of the “beast”, and proves that in Gévaudan a manmade catastrophe occurred.



Feathers of Inheritance

by Lori Venturella

Feathers of Inheritances is the story of two generations. One, is that of a girl, who at a tender age, fell from a tree and became paralyzed from the waist down. She becomes a quiet observer of the world around her, until love finds her. It also, tells the story of Paul Wallace. In three years he goes from being a confederate soldier, to a prisoner on Rock Island Prison, to a U.S Volunteer in the wild Kansas Territory. By the time he is mustered out he is considered a traitor and is unable to return home. It is through these two generations that we learn inheritance is passed down, not only through blood, but through sacrifice and hope.



DRAFTED and SERVED: Edward Skip Swain – One Citizen Soldier’s Experiences In Vietnam

by Stephen Banks

This is the story in words and more than 150 photographs of Skip Swain – a young guy from Kenmore, New York, who in 1968 at age nineteen was drafted and sent to Vietnam. The book focuses extensively on Swain’s training and ultimate service as an infantryman with a one of a kind outfit: B Company “The Warlords,” 123rd Aviation Battalion, Americal Division. The Warlords’ unique and dangerous mission was to fly around looking for the enemy and when they found him, rather than kill him their goal was to “snatch” him for interrogation. The book recounts in detail Swain’s and The Warlords’ actions and contributions during his fourteen months in Vietnam. The Warlords became very good at what they did – capturing hundreds of the enemy. Their success earned them fame – as well as a bounty on their heads. Using the results of many hours of interviews, as well as hundreds of other sources including: Army records, unit histories, personal recollections, photos, e-mail, books, newspapers, magazines, and Web sites, the author tells the story – frequently in the men’s own words – of the anxiety, the excitement, the sacrifices, the often humorous attempts to relieve stress, and the fear as Swain and his buddies did what our country asked of them.



Exceptional Americans 2: The Capitalists

by Donald Surber

“Exceptional Americans 2, The Capitalists” is a tribute to the people who the people who built the world’s greatest economy, from Stephen Girard, the father of philanthropy, to Elizabeth Holmes who is revolutionizing the health industry.



History of the Later Roman Empire from the Death of Theodosius I to the Death of Justinian

by J.B. Bury

J.B. Bury was a celebrated historian who wrote around the turn of the 19th century.  His classics on the Roman Empire and Greece still stand among the best texts on the classical civilizations.



The Works of Alexander Hamilton: Volume 8

by Alexander Hamilton

Unfortunately, one of the best known aspects of Alexander Hamilton’s (1755-1804) life is the manner in which he died, being shot and killed in a famous duel with Aaron Burr in 1804. But Hamilton became one of the most instrumental Founding Fathers of the United States in that time, not only in helping draft and gain support for the U.S. Constitution but in also leading the Federalist party and building the institutions of the young federal government as Washington’s Secretary of Treasury.

Hamilton is also well remembered for his authorship, along with John Jay and James Madison, of the Federalist Papers. The Federalist Papers sought to rally support for the Constitution’s approval when those three anonymously wrote them, but for readers and scholars today they also help us get into the mindset of the Founding Fathers, including the “Father of the Constitution” himself. They also help demonstrate how men of vastly different political ideologies came to accept the same Constitution.

Hamilton was a prominent politician and a prolific writer who had his hand in everything from the Constitution, the Federalist Papers, and President Washington’s speeches, as well as an influential voice in policy and the formation of initial political parties. His works were compiled into a giant 12 volume series by Henry Cabot, which included everything from his speeches to his private correspondence.  This edition of Hamilton’s Works: Volume 8 includes his Miscellaneous Papers covering events from 1787-1801, such as the French Revolution and the debate over taxation, as well as drafting speeches for President Washington, Washington’s Farewell Address, relations with Native Americans, and more



Germany, Turkey and Armenia: A Selection of Documentary Evidence Relating to the Armenian Atrocities from German and Other Sources

by Anonymous

This is a contemporary history that documents the Armenian Genocide at the hands of the Ottoman Turks in the early 20th century. From the intro:

“The blue book as to the treatment of the Armenians which has recently been issued (Miscellaneous, No. 31, 1916) contains a large mass of evidence relating to facts which, incredible as they are, have been so incontrovertibly established that no doubt as to their existence can possibly be entertained by any reasonable person. The greater part of the documents included in the blue book does not, however, throw much light on the attitude taken by the German public and the German Government with reference to the crimes which have been committed. The object of this pamphlet is to bring before the public a collection of documents specially selected for the purpose of throwing light on this subject. Some of them are included in the blue book, but the documents Nos. 1, 6, 9, 10 and 12 have not, as yet, been published in Great Britain or the United States. The two documents printed in the Appendix have no direct bearing on the questions relating to the German attitude. But as they came into the possession of the British authorities after the publication of the blue book and are of special interest as giving the impressions of two intelligent Turkish officers,1 it was thought right to include them. 

A perusal of the documents included in this collection must convince the reader of three things: (1) that the Germans in Armenia are as full of indignation, and as anxious to see a stop put to the methods of extermination applied by the Turkish Government, as the most ardent friends of the Armenian cause in this country; (2) that, owing to the wilful or reckless perversion of the facts in the German press and the German pamphlet-literature, and owing also to the indifference and credulity of the general German public, the true state of things is unknown or ignored by the majority; (3) that the German Government could have stopped the outrages if they had desired to do so and that their non-interference was not in any way due to ignorance of the true facts.”



Discipleship

by G. Campbell Morgan

G. Campbell Morgan was one of Britain’s foremost Biblical scholars during the early 20th century, and his works on religious topics continue to be widely read today, including this one.



Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom

by Ellen Craft

This is a 19th century memoir written by a slave who escaped the South before the Civil War. Here’s an excerpt from the intro:

“Having heard while in Slavery that “God made of one blood all nations of men,” and also that the American Declaration of Independence says, that “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these, are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness;” we could not understand by what right we were held as “chattels.” Therefore, we felt perfectly justified in undertaking the dangerous and exciting task of “running a thousand miles” in order to obtain those rights which are so vividly set forth in the Declaration.

I beg those who would know the particulars of our journey, to peruse these pages.

This book is not intended as a full history of the life of my wife, nor of myself; but merely as an account of our escape; together with other matter which I hope may be the means of creating in some minds a deeper abhorrence of the sinful and abominable practice of enslaving and brutifying our fellow-creatures.”



The History of the Standard Oil Company: Volume 1 of 2

by Ida Tarbell

Ida Tarbell was a famous journalist and author who wrote a bunch of scathing works about the robber barons and monopolies at the turn of the century, helping steer public opinion towards the kind of progressive policies and anti-trust laws passed by President Theodore Roosevelt in the early 1900s.



Science and Health, with Keys to the Scriptures

by Mary Baker Eddy

Among the various religious movements of the 19th century, few have had as widespread an influence as Christian Science, the religious system devised by a fragile little lady named Mary Baker Eddy. Eddy was a religious woman who suffered an injury in the 1860s that led her to found a new church premised most notably on the belief that people need not turn to medicine or drugs to heal themselves but simply to reach a better understanding of the nature of God.  
 
Just before founding this new church, Eddy published her movement’s seminal text, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (1875), which laid out her expansive views about Christianity, and the metaphysical reasons she believed that people could overcome illness without relying on man-made technology. In effect, since sin, disease, and death are not God’s making, men could also shed them by becoming closer to God. In addition to founding her church and authoring that seminal book, Eddy wrote voluminously over the coming decades, helping establish both the Christian Science Journal and most famously the Christian Science Monitor. 
 
Not surprisingly, Eddy’s religious teachings were controversial, but so was the woman herself. She was embroiled in all sorts of disputes, including whether she had plagiarized the teachings of her contemporary, Phineas Quimby. Despite having famous critics like Mark Twain attacking her teachings, and others questioning whether they were even hers, the Church grew to include hundreds of thousands of followers in the early 20th century. While that number has dwindled over recent decades, the Church and its institutions are still going strong today.



The Canons of Dort: The Decision of the Synod of Dordt on the Five Main Points of Doctrine in Dispute in the Netherlands

by Anonymous

The Canons of Dort, or Canons of Dordrecht, formally titled The Decision of the Synod of Dort on the Five Main Points of Doctrine in Dispute in the Netherlands, is the judgment of the National Synod held in the Dutch city of Dordrecht in 1618-19. At the time, Dordrecht was often referred to in English as Dort. Today, the Canons of Dort form part of the Three Forms of Unity, one of the confessional standards of many of the Reformed churches around the world, including the Netherlands, South Africa, Australia, and North America. Their continued use as a standard still forms an unbridgable problem preventing close cooperation between the followers of Jacob Arminius, the Remonstrants, and Dutch Reformed Churches.

These canons are in actuality a judicial decision on the doctrinal points in dispute from the Arminian controversy of that day. Following the death of Arminius (1560-1609), his followers set forth a Remonstrance (published in 1610) in five articles formulating their points of departure from the stricter Calvinism of the Belgic Confession. The Canons are the judgment of the Synod against this Remonstrance. Regardless, Arminian theology later received official acceptance by the State and has since continued in various forms within Protestantism.

The Canons were not intended to be a comprehensive explanation of Reformed doctrine, but only an exposition on the five points of doctrine in dispute. These Canons set forth what is often referred to as the Five Points of Calvinism. 



God’s Methods with Man

by G. Campbell Morgan

G. Campbell Morgan was one of Britain’s foremost Biblical scholars during the early 20th century, and his works on religious topics continue to be widely read today, including this one.



Twofold Use of the Law & Gospel

by Martin Luther

Martin Luther was one of the most influential men of the last millennium, and the man most responsible for the Reformation that split the Catholic Church in the 16th century. A German theologian, Luther wrote at length criticizing the Church and sparked the Reformation, all while being one of the most read authors on the continent in his lifetime. His teachings included important departures from Church dogma, including the claim that absolution of sin could not be purchased. Today his 95 Theses are among the most famous works in the world.



To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation

by Martin Luther

Martin Luther was one of the most influential men of the last millennium, and the man most responsible for the Reformation that split the Catholic Church in the 16th century. A German theologian, Luther wrote at length criticizing the Church and sparked the Reformation, all while being one of the most read authors on the continent in his lifetime. His teachings included important departures from Church dogma, including the claim that absolution of sin could not be purchased. Today his 95 Theses are among the most famous works in the world.



A History of Egypt from the Earliest Times to the Persian Conquest

by James Henry Breasted

James Henry Breasted’s A History of Egypt from the Earliest Times to the Persian Conquest is an expansive history covering the period from the dawn of civilization to the 6th century B.C.



A History of the Eastern Roman Empire from the Fall of Irene to the Accession of Basil I

by J.B. Bury

J.B. Bury was a celebrated historian who wrote around the turn of the 19th century.  His classics on the Roman Empire and Greece still stand among the best texts on the classical civilizations.



Crescent and Iron Cross

by E.F. Benson

Edward Frederic Benson was an English archaeologist and writer. Benson’s most famous works are the Mapp and Lucia series about Emmeline “Lucia” Lucas and Elizabeth Mapp.



On Prayer

by Tertullian

Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, commonly referred to as Tertullian (c. 160 – c. 220 AD), was raised in Carthage. He was thought to be the son of a Roman centurion, a trained lawyer, and an ordained priest. These assertions rely on the accounts of Eusebius of Caesarea, Church History,  and St. Jerome’s De viris illustribus (On famous men).

Tertullian is the first Christian author to produce an extensive corpus of Latin Christian literature. He also was a notable early Christian apologist and a polemicist against heresy. Tertullian has been called “the father of Latin Christianity”and “the founder of Western theology.” Though conservative, he did originate and advance new theology to the early Church. He is perhaps most famous for being the oldest extant Latin writer to use the term Trinity (Latin trinitas),and giving the oldest extant formal exposition of a Trinitarian theology.[Other Latin formulations that first appear in his work are “three Persons, one Substance” as the Latin “tres Personae, una Substantia” . He wrote his trinitarian formula after becoming a Montanist; his ideas were at first rejected as heresy by the church at large, but later accepted as Christian orthodoxyScant reliable evidence exists to inform us about Tertullian’s life. Most history about him comes from passing references in his own writings.



The Coming Prince: The Marvelous Prophecy of Daniel’s Seventy Weeks Concerning the Antichrist

by Sir Robert Anderson

Sir Robert Anderson was an Assistant Commissioner of the London Metropolitan police, as well as a theologian and writer.  Anderson’s best known works include The Coming Prince and The Silence of God.



A God Ready to Pardon

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



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