Free history Kindle books for 26 Dec 15

The War of Independence

by John Fiske

John Fiske was a 19th century American historian who wrote several acclaimed books about the Revolutionary War and the colonial era, including this one.



The First Charter of Virginia: The Charter of 1606

by Anonymous

The Charter of 1606, also known as the First Charter of Virginia, is a document from King James I of England to the Virginia Company assigning land rights to colonists for the stated purpose of propagating the Christian religion. The land is described as coastal Virginia and islands near to the coast, but the surveying numbers correspond to modern day South Carolina to Canada. The land itself would remain the property of the King, with the London Company as the King’s tenant, and the settlers as subtenants. The colony’s government at first consisted of a council residing in London. The document designated the London Company as responsible for financing the project, which included recruiting settlers and providing for their transport and supplies.

King James I formed the Virginia Company, which itself consisted of a pair of separately managed companies called the London Company and the Plymouth Company. Both of these companies were to operate under the Charter of 1606, but in different regions within the same range, and without building colonies within 100 miles (160 km) of each other. The London company was a group of entrepreneurs from London to live and rule in North America. The Virginia Company started its settlement in Chesapeake, Virginia. King James has granted the Virginia Company the power and authority to operate and run their lives and to enjoy many freedoms.

The charter contains only one statement of purpose, a religious mission: “propagating of Christian religion”. King James I also intended to spread Christianity to those already living in what was to become the English colonies. The charter also granted those that are born in the colonies all the rights of British citizens elsewhere and that they will be compensated and protected in case they were robbed or spoiled by anyone. 



The Condition of the Working-Class in England in 1844

by Friedrich Engels

Friedrich Engels (November 28, 1820 – August 5, 1895) was a German industrialist, social scientist, author, political theorist, philosopher, and father of Marxist theory, working in close collaboration alongside Karl Marx. In 1845, he published The Condition of the Working Class in England, based on personal observations and research. In 1848, he produced with Marx The Communist Manifesto and later he supported Marx financially to do research and write Das Kapital. After Marx’s death Engels edited the second and third volumes. Additionally, Engels organized Marx’s notes on the “Theories of Surplus Value” and this was later published as the “fourth volume” of Capital.

Engels is commonly known as a “ruthless party tactician”, “brutal ideologue”, and “master tactician” when it came to purging rivals in political organizations. However, another strand of Engels’s personality was one of a “gregarious”, “big-hearted”, and “jovial man of outsize appetites”, who was referred to by his son-in-law as “the great beheader of champagne bottles.” 



A Neglected Duty

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



What Was Become of Peter?

by Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers”. Spurgeon was to 19th century England what D. L Moody was to America. Although Spurgeon never attended theological school, by the age of twenty-one he was the most popular preacher in London.

A strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times each week at different places. Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later the Metropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years, despite the fact he was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally, and he also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works, including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.



Lysistrata

by Aristophanes

Aristophanes was one of the Ancient Greeks’ most famous playwrights, and some of his works survived to the modern day, including this one.



Swiss Heroes

by George P. Upton

George P. Upton was an American journalist who translated and wrote several works about European history, including this one.



Socialism: Utopian and Scientific

by Friedrich Engels

Friedrich Engels (November 28, 1820 – August 5, 1895) was a German industrialist, social scientist, author, political theorist, philosopher, and father of Marxist theory, working in close collaboration alongside Karl Marx. In 1845, he published The Condition of the Working Class in England, based on personal observations and research. In 1848, he produced with Marx The Communist Manifesto and later he supported Marx financially to do research and write Das Kapital. After Marx’s death Engels edited the second and third volumes. Additionally, Engels organized Marx’s notes on the “Theories of Surplus Value” and this was later published as the “fourth volume” of Capital.

Engels is commonly known as a “ruthless party tactician”, “brutal ideologue”, and “master tactician” when it came to purging rivals in political organizations. However, another strand of Engels’s personality was one of a “gregarious”, “big-hearted”, and “jovial man of outsize appetites”, who was referred to by his son-in-law as “the great beheader of champagne bottles.” 



Confederate Military History: The Chancellorsville Campaign and Death of Jackson

by Clement A. Evans

Confederate Military History is a 12-volume series of books written and/or edited by former Confederate general Clement A. Evans that deals with specific topics related to the military personalities, places, battles, and campaigns in various Southern United States, including those of the Confederacy.

Written with a heavy Southern slant, the articles that comprise the compendium deal with the famous events of the war. This account is of the Chancellorsville Campaign of April-May 1863, which culminated with the Battle of Chancellorsville. Despite being heavily outnumbered, General Robert E. Lee daringly split his army in the face of the Army of the Potomac and sent Stonewall Jackson’s corps across the Union’s left flank. Jackson’s march and attack greatly surprised the XI Corps, routing it and eventually disrupting General Joe Hooker’s plans. The battle would eventually result in the Army of Northern Virginia’s most impressive tactical victory, but it would cost them Stonewall Jackson, who was mortally wounded at the height of his glory and died days after the battle. 



Erik the Red, Leif the Lucky, and Other Pre-Columbian Discoverers of America

by George P. Upton

George P. Upton was an American journalist who translated and wrote several works about European history, including this one about the most famous Vikings.



Two Conventions: Politics at the 1948 and 2016 Democratic Party Conventions in Philadelphia

by Stanley Cutler

A wide-ranging exploration of the changes in American politics and society using the tools of rhetorical criticism. As a benchmark, the historic 1948 Democratic Party Convention provides a way to understand the effects of the State primary elections and communication technologies on democratic institutions and public discourse.



True Stories of the OSS and CIA: Secrets, Lies and Deception

by Mike Rothmiller

These are the TRUE accounts of the OSS and CIA. These essays were expertly written for classified use of CIA personnel. They have NOT been edited. All the essays were classified from CONFIDENTIAL TO TOP-SECRET.

Studies include; WW2 secret ops, covert action, truth drugs for interrogation, cover in unconventional operations, CIA in the academic world, the covert collection of scientific information and spies. This is just a sampling of the top-secret essays included in the book.

The United States Intelligence community as known to the public is comprised of 17 agencies that work separately, and at times, in concert to conduct intelligence activities in the field of foreign relations and national security. Members of this community include intelligence agencies, military intelligence, and civilian intelligence and analysis offices within federal executive departments.

Most intelligence operations are conceived and carried out by patriots in the interest of national security or during time of war. However, not all intelligence operations were successful and many were based in the theory that the end, justifies the means. At times, distasteful actions and assassinations are undertaken to safeguard the masses or protect national interest. This is not to say that all governmental intelligence operations were undertaken to safeguard the country and our freedoms. Some were ordered by various presidents to crush their political rivals.

Interestingly, the CIA is notorious for secrecy and more often than not, the agency refuses to release documents requested in a Freedom of Information Request (FOIA) or under a Mandatory Declassification Request (MDR). Here’s the interesting twist. These studies contain a wealth of details and informative footnotes identifying the source. Even if you filed a FOIA for all the documents contained in the footnotes, it would take years to obtain themâ??if the CIA would provide the documents. So, in an unexpected turn of events the CIA has opened Pandora’s Box allowing us to review information they thought would remain secret, and in some cases, would prefer remained secret. But the documents are available for review, if you know where and how to secure them. As individual stories they are indeed interesting, taken as a whole, they truly enlighten and demonstrate the enormous scope of the intelligence community.

As you read these remarkable stories you’ll gain an appreciation for the work and exploits of these men and women; and a basic understanding of how complex and daunting the world of intelligence gathering is. You may not agree with the methods employed or the outcome, but the veil of secrecy keeping intelligence Ops in the dark will be partially removed providing a rare insider’s glimpse into decades of intelligence operations, the thought process of intelligence officers and the magnitude of some operations. Taken in their full context, these were truly remarkable undertakings.

These stories are just the tip of the iceberg illustrating the wide spectrum of intelligence activities carried out by the OSS and todays CIA. You’ll notice that some names have been blackened out and some information redacted, this was done by the CIA.

These stories are as intriguing, informative and frightening as the best spy novels.

In closing, you are about to enter the world of secrets, lies and deception. Your life will never be the same.



The Westminster Confession of Faith and Westminster Shorter Catechism

by Anonymous

The Westminster Confession of Faith is a Reformed confession of faith, in the Calvinist theological tradition. Although drawn up by the 1646 Westminster Assembly, largely of the Church of England, it became and remains the â??subordinate standard’ of doctrine in the Church of Scotland, and has been influential within Presbyterian churches worldwide.

In 1643, the English Parliament called upon “learned, godly and judicious Divines”, to meet at Westminster Abbey in order to provide advice on issues of worship, doctrine, government and discipline of the Church of England. Their meetings, over a period of five years, produced the confession of faith, as well as a Larger Catechism and a Shorter Catechism. For more than three centuries, various churches around the world have adopted the confession and the catechisms as their standards of doctrine, subordinate to the Bible.
The Westminster Shorter Catechism (also known simply as the Shorter Catechism or WSC) was written in the 1640s by English and Scottish divines. The assembly also produced the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Westminster Larger Catechism. The three documents are considered by many Protestants to be the grandest doctrinal statements to come out of the English Reformation. Completed in 1647, it was presented to the Long Parliament on 14 April 1648.

The purpose of the Shorter Catechism is to educate lay persons in matters of doctrine and belief. The WSC is in a simple question and answer format to facilitate memorization. Typically, parents and the church would use the shorter catechism to train their children in the ways of the Lord. New converts are also given the WSC as well as the Confession of Faith and Holy Scripture to study. Various denominations have used the Westminster Confession and Catechism to instruct their members.



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