Free literary fiction Kindle books for 30 Jun 16

Adult Bedtime Stories: Erotic Romance Novels – Romantic Short Story Anthology of Billionaire Romance, Highlander Romance, Viking Romance, New Adult, Romantic Comedy, Mail Order Bride Romance Novels

by Lady Aingealicia

‘Slowly he kissed his way down as she let him do what he wanted. She felt his hands rip away her lace panties. She gasped and gave a small chuckle. He lifted her onto a bench and laid her down, spreading her legs as she looked at him and noticed the sixpack he had. Tracing her nails along the edges to the top of his pants, she undid the belt and unzipped them. As they fell to the ground, she felt how hard he was and knew she needed to feel him inside her..’

This is a romance short story collection

Tags: XXL, Short Stories, Romance, Thriller, Collection



The Great Gatsby (Kindle Edition)

by Francis Scott Fitzgerald

In 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write “something new–something extraordinary and beautiful and simple + intricately patterned.” That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald’s finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author’s generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald’s–and his country’s–most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter–tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning–” Gatsby’s rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream.

It’s also a love story, of sorts, the narrative of Gatsby’s quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan. The pair meet five years before the novel begins, when Daisy is a legendary young Louisville beauty and Gatsby an impoverished officer. They fall in love, but while Gatsby serves overseas, Daisy marries the brutal, bullying, but extremely rich Tom Buchanan. After the war, Gatsby devotes himself blindly to the pursuit of wealth by whatever means–and to the pursuit of Daisy, which amounts to the same thing. “Her voice is full of money,” Gatsby says admiringly, in one of the novel’s more famous descriptions. His millions made, Gatsby buys a mansion across Long Island Sound from Daisy’s patrician East Egg address, throws lavish parties, and waits for her to appear. When she does, events unfold with all the tragic inevitability of a Greek drama, with detached, cynical neighbor Nick Carraway acting as chorus throughout. Spare, elegantly plotted, and written in crystalline prose, The Great Gatsby is as perfectly satisfying as the best kind of po



ROMANCE: Stepbrother’s Needs (Coming of Age Contemporary Romance)

by Kristina Royer

ROMANCE

We all look for someone that we can spend the rest of our life with laughing, playing, dancing, growing. But what if the person you are ready to give all to, including you body mind and soul is actually the person will crush you down? What if he’s really not the person he who says he is?

Enter the mind and world of Lauren, a simple woman who has big dreams. And when love came along she felt scared… just like everybody else when it first land right in front of us. Read how she’ll handle all emotions that everyone is so afraid to face. If you’re looking something philosophical, mind opening, this story is written for you!

Click BUY Now!

This book will definitely make you laugh. If you’re looking for something funny and sweet this book is definitely for you!



The Great Gatsby

by Francis Scott Fitzgerald

In 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write “something new–something extraordinary and beautiful and simple + intricately patterned.” That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald’s finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author’s generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald’s–and his country’s–most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter–tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning–” Gatsby’s rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream.

It’s also a love story, of sorts, the narrative of Gatsby’s quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan. The pair meet five years before the novel begins, when Daisy is a legendary young Louisville beauty and Gatsby an impoverished officer. They fall in love, but while Gatsby serves overseas, Daisy marries the brutal, bullying, but extremely rich Tom Buchanan. After the war, Gatsby devotes himself blindly to the pursuit of wealth by whatever means–and to the pursuit of Daisy, which amounts to the same thing. “Her voice is full of money,” Gatsby says admiringly, in one of the novel’s more famous descriptions. His millions made, Gatsby buys a mansion across Long Island Sound from Daisy’s patrician East Egg address, throws lavish parties, and waits for her to appear. When she does, events unfold with all the tragic inevitability of a Greek drama, with detached, cynical neighbor Nick Carraway acting as chorus throughout. Spare, elegantly plotted, and written in crystalline prose, The Great Gatsby is as perfectly satisfying as the best kind of poem
The Great Gatsby is a novel by the American author F. Scott Fitzgerald. First published on April 10, 1925, it is set on Long Island’s North Shore and in New York City during the summer of 1922.

The novel takes place following the First World War. American society enjoyed prosperity during the “roaring” 1920s as the economy soared. At the same time, Prohibition, the ban on the sale and manufacture of alcohol as mandated by the Eighteenth Amendment, made millionaires out of bootleggers. After its republishing in 1945 and 1953, it quickly found a wide readership and is today widely regarded as a paragon of the Great American Novel, and a literary classic. The Great Gatsby has become a standard text in high school and university courses on American literature in countries around the world, and is ranked second in the Modern Library’s lists of the 100 Best Novels of the 20th Century.



The Vale of Health

by Chris Bell

“I’ve not been well. Too much noise in my head, a kind of teetering, skittering feeling as though everything’s about to come crashing down. I’m in need of a different sort of distraction; something grounded, with less noise than the internet. The look of one of the trees in the park opposite my study in the summer light; that occulting of sun on leaves stirring in the breeze â?? so complex; such a manyness of brightnesses and shade â?? reminds me there is something larger than us in a way my computer cannot, and I need to be reminded of that.” A short story about a painting that has a life of its own… The Vale of Health is a part of London’s Hampstead Heath, supposedly so called because the area was spared by the Great Plague of 1665-1666. This Chris Bell short story was inspired by a Henry Lamb portrait of the writer Lytton Strachey, a man who was something of a stranger to good health, in spite of the fact that he sat for Lamb in his Vale of Health studio over a period of several years. Henry Lamb’s portrait of Lytton Strachey can be viewed online at the Tate Collection’s website.



Scudder’s Gorge

by Geoffrey Craig

Scudder’s Gorge shines a harsh light on what man is capable of doing to his fellow man, beginning with the day of the “bomb” in Hiroshima and then moving backwards in time to Eighteenth Century Vermont to a village founded by post-Revolutionary settlers. Nestled between pine-clad ridges, the valley is home to a small band of Abenaki. The settlers and Native Americans trade with each other and live in peace until a love affair blossoms between a young Abenaki and the daughter of a village elder. A crime reverberates down the generations, leading Everett Scudder and his daughter, Roseanne, to struggle for the dignity of all people.

Geoffrey Craig’s fiction, poetry and drama have appeared in numerous literary journals. He has received two Pushcart Prize nominations. Wilderness House Literary Review serialized his verse novel, The Brave Maiden, and his novella, “Snow”. Four of his full-length plays (one co-authored) and nine of his one-acts have been produced. He has directed productions of five of his plays with three more in rehearsals. Geoffrey has an MBA and an MA in history. He served in the Peace Corps and had a successful career in banking before turning to writing. Scudder’s Gorge is his first prose novel.



Destiny by chance: A Contemporary Romance Fiction Novel

by Margaret Ferguson

…In a breath of a moment, Destiny loses everything she cares anything aboutâ??her son, her husband, her faith and even herself. How does one overcome the guilt of still being alive?  Will the pain she encounters on the road to recovery be too much to bear or is she strong enough to begin again? Is her tattered heart truly closed off forever, or is there really another chance?



THE VOICE OF THE VICTIM

by Robert Trainor

NOTE: This novel can also be purchased with four other novels of mine for $3.99 in an anthology entitled 5 Novels. The Voice of the Victim is also contained in The Blackwater Novels, which can be purchased for $3.99.

Originally entitled Sarcasm, Murder, and Outrageâ?¦not only is this a clever murder mystery, but it also doubles as a satirical tour through Darwin City and the modern world of guns, murder, and mayhemâ?¦a mixture of slapstick comedy, dark premonitions, and a sweeping indictment of everything that Western culture has ever producedâ?¦sassy and extremely irreverentâ?¦sometimes romantic and poetic, sometimes mocking and belligerentâ?¦too bizarre for some, too intense for others…never trite but always real…this is the most controversial book that you will ever read.

What follows is the Preface.

During the month of June, in 1999, I became entangled in a number of tragic events that completely altered the way I came to look at life. Although these incidents remained only locally significant and were not widely reported in the national media, they are certainly dramatic enough to merit their space in print. Beyond that, however, I discovered something that is far more important to me than the juvenile thrill of seeing my name on the cover of a book: As the detection of a certain clue at a murder scene points inevitably to the perpetrator, the experience of becoming a living victim led me to a realization that is actually–despite many humorous interludes–the subject of what you are about to read.

For legal, ethical, and poetical reasons, I have changed the names of everyone who was involved in these crimes as well as the city where they occurred. The names I have chosen were not arrived at casually but are an artistic attempt to portray the essential and true character of contemporary life. It will be said that I exaggerate or that I am cynical and bitter, but I view myself as an advocate for all the vanishing victims of our world because I have experienced, in my mind, the sounds of their screams. They have not gone gently into oblivion but are screaming, screaming to be heard. The modern-day martyrs have something to tell us, and it is, in my opinion, far more relevant than what the living are propagating, which amounts to nothing.



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