Free historical fiction Kindle books for 24 Apr 17

Reluctant Mail Order Bride

by Johanna Jenkins

Mail Order Bride
A standalone short story with HEA!

Clara Grace longs for only one thing: to be free. She longs to be free of her father who has always resented her; she longs to be free of the house which still contains the ghost of her older sister who passed on a year ago. But, when her father announces that he placed a personal ad in her name seeking a husband out west and, what’s more, he has accepted a proposal on her behalf, she can’t help but think that this is not the freedom she imagined. Even though the letters Alfred Bell has written to her father (who wrote to the young man under Clara’s name) are eloquent and reveal the his intelligence and polite manner, Clara is reluctant to accept that she will be happy with a man she has never met. When she meets Alfred, however, she discovers that, like her, he is at the mercy of a demanding father. Now, Clara must make a decision. Will she stay with Alfred and face the demands of his family with him, or will she strike out to find freedom on her own?

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Virgin Love: The Virgin Romance Bundle – New Adult, Virgin Romance Stories, Billionaire Romance, First Time, College Romance, Loosing my Virginity, Bondageromance, Viking & Highlander Anthology

by Lady Aingealicia

‘She gasped as she saw a corset fall out with a pair of thigh highs. He looked at it and shook his head. Taking another sip of wine, he felt the thigh highs. They were silk. Misty just stared and went for the drink he poured her. She knew this might lead to trouble, yet she did not care..’

This is a romantic inspirational collection

Tags: Group, collection, inspirational, romance, short story, short stories



Sterling Redmond

by Kim Nathan

Set in Gilded Age America, a young woman must choose between circumstance and destiny. Orphaned as small children, Sterling Redmond and her older sister Charlotte are raised by their grandfather at the family’s Maryland country estate of Northampton. Charlotte blossoms into a famed Baltimore beauty, but Sterling is more interested in books and horseback riding than feminine pursuits. Concerned that her niece will never find a suitable husband among the local Baltimore gentry, Madame De Chant whisks Sterling away to Belle Ã?poque Paris in search of a gentleman who can understand her. In their absence, Nicholas Pembroke, the son of an English earl, takes up residence in the manor bordering Northampton. When Sterling and her aunt return to America for Charlotte’s wedding, Sterling finds that her perfect husband is living right next door. But there is a problem: he is already engaged to marry Charlotte.

Excerpt from Sterling Redmond:

“Sterling Redmond walked into the room, and Nicholas saw her for the first time. He had not yet met her, but Charlotte had told him this about her: she was dull. Her disposition was too serious. Some called her a bluestocking. In short, she was a problem. A young woman of such a prominent and influential Baltimore family was expected to secure a marriage worthy of her social status. After two seasons in Paris, where her great-aunt Madame De Chant maintained a household, she had yet to win a firm offer of marriage. There was a growing impatience among her closest family members, who wondered if her education and forthright manner prevented any positive momentum in this direction, and to make matters worse, Charlotte complained, the young woman seemed not the slightest bit interested in abandoning her independence. Charlotte painted her sister’s prospects in such a dim light that Nicholas was astonished when the supposedly awkward and plain sister walked into the drawing room, and he saw a creature quite unlike the one described to him. Two years spent in Europe had clearly transformed the younger Miss Redmond into something unrecognizable.”



A Treasure of the Redwoods

by Bret Harte

America has always had a fascination with the Wild West, and schoolchildren grow up learning about famous Westerners like Wyatt Earp, Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill Hicock, as well as the infamous shootout at O.K. Corral. Pioneering and cowboys and Indians have been just as popular in Hollywood, with Westerners helping turn John Wayne and Clint Eastwood into legends on the silver screen. HBO’s Deadwood, about the historical 19th century mining town on the frontier was popular last decade.

Not surprisingly, a lot has been written about the West, and one of the best known writers about the West in the 19th century was Francis Bret Harte (1836-1902), who wrote poetry and short stories during his literary career. Harte was on the West Coast by the 1860s, placing himself in perfect position to document and depict frontier life. 



Heart and Science

by Wilkie Collins

Wilkie Collins’s later novels are often as concerned with social issues as they are with simple storytelling-but as more and more critics are suggesting, the best of them are as readable and thought-provoking today as they were when they first appeared. Of none is this more true than of his 1883 novel Heart and Science, which Collins himself placed alongside his masterpiece The Woman in White.

Heart and Science‘s story of the struggle between strong-willed women will strike chords of sympathetic understanding with modern readers-as will its vivisectionist theme, with it’s clear parallels to the animal welfare/ animal rights debates of today.



An Episode of Fiddletown

by Bret Harte

America has always had a fascination with the Wild West, and schoolchildren grow up learning about famous Westerners like Wyatt Earp, Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill Hicock, as well as the infamous shootout at O.K. Corral. Pioneering and cowboys and Indians have been just as popular in Hollywood, with Westerners helping turn John Wayne and Clint Eastwood into legends on the silver screen. HBO’s Deadwood, about the historical 19th century mining town on the frontier was popular last decade.

Not surprisingly, a lot has been written about the West, and one of the best known writers about the West in the 19th century was Francis Bret Harte (1836-1902), who wrote poetry and short stories during his literary career. Harte was on the West Coast by the 1860s, placing himself in perfect position to document and depict frontier life. 



The Wife of his Youth and Other Stories of the Color Line

by Charles W. Chesnutt

Charles W. Chesnutt was a prominent African-American writer, lawyer, and political activist. Chesnutt was a prolific author and his books were notable for exploring the racial and social issues in the American South after the Civil War.

The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories of the Color Line is a short story collection that was published in 1899.



The Three Cities Trilogy: All Volumes

by Emile Zola

Ã?mile Zola is one of the greatest writers of the 19th century, and one of France’s best known citizens. In his life, Zola was the most important exemplar of the literary school of naturalism and a major figure in the political liberalization of France. Around the end of his life, Zola was instrumental in helping secure the exoneration of the falsely accused and convicted army officer Alfred Dreyfus, a victim of anti-Semitism. The Dreyfus Affair was encapsulated in the renowned newspaper headline J’Accuse.

More than half of Zola’s novels were part of this set of 20 collectively known as Les Rougon-Macquart. Unlike Honore de Balzac, who compiled his works into La Comedie Humaine midway through, Zola mapped out a complete layout of his series. Set in France’s Second Empire, the series traces the “environmental” influences of violence, alcohol and prostitution which became more prevalent during the second wave of the Industrial Revolution. The series examines two branches of a family: the respectable Rougons and the disreputable Macquarts for five generations. Zola explained, “I want to portray, at the outset of a century of liberty and truth, a family that cannot restrain itself in its rush to possess all the good things that progress is making available and is derailed by its own momentum, the fatal convulsions that accompany the birth of a new world.” 



From Farm Boy to Senator

by Horatio Alger Jr.

Horatio Alger Jr. was a prolific American author in the 19th century. Alger’s books often portrayed classic rags-to-riches stories which had a major effect on the United States during the Gilded Age. Alger’s writings were geared towards young adults.

From Farm Boy to Senator is a novel that tells the story of Daniel Webster, a prominent American politician in the 19th century. A table of contents is included.



Buried Alive

by Arnold Bennett

Arnold Bennett was a prolific British writer who penned dozens of works across all genres, from adventurous fiction to propaganda and nonfiction. He wrote plays like Judith and historical novels like Tales of the Five Towns.



TESLA: The Otherworld (1)

by TED LAMPRON

The year is 1906, and Nikola Tesla is desperately trying to find new investors for his newest invention of a wireless transmission station being built on his Wardenclyffe property at Shoreham, New York. After sinking all of his money into the project, he is now nearly broke and without the additional funds needed to finish building his giant transmission tower. Nikola grows increasingly depressed and becomes reclusive, spending much of his time working on a secret project called, A.R.M. The genius inventor spends much of his time at Wardenclyffe, working in a clandestine laboratory built in an underground tunnel beneath his large estate. Only he and his two lab assistants know of the project. Tesla’s newest invention is beyond the boundaries of belief and will change the world as we know it. But there are inherent dangers in the inventor’s latest creation . . . A device he calls the Alternate Reality Machine.
This is a companion novel introducing ‘The Realm of Eternal Magic’



Bound to Rise, or, Up the Ladder

by Jr. Horatio Alger

If you’ve ever used the phrase “rags to riches,” you owe that to Horatio Alger, Jr. (1832-1899), who popularized the idea through his fictional writings that also served as a theme for the way America viewed itself as a country. Alger’s works about poor boys rising to better living conditions through hard work, determination, courage, honesty, and morals was popular with both adults and younger readers.

Alger’s writings happened to correspond with America’s Gilded Age, a time of increasing prosperity in a nation rebuilding from the Civil War. His lifelong theme of rags to riches continued to gain popularity but has gradually lessened since the 1920s. Still, readers today often come across Ragged Dick and stories like it in school.



The House Behind the Cedars

by Charles W. Chesnutt

Charles W. Chesnutt was a prominent African-American writer, lawyer, and political activist. Chesnutt was a prolific author and his books were notable for exploring the racial and social issues in the American South after the Civil War.

The House Behind the Cedars, published in 1900, is Chesnutt’s first novel. The book is set in the South a few years before the Civil War and centers around a family of mixed white and black ancestry. The book is famous for its exploration of interracial relations.



From Glaciers to Mammoths (The Glacial Connection)

by Fred Brede

Did you ever wonder what you would do if you found a mammoth under your back yard. Well that’s just what happens to the Flom family when they found that the glaciers had buried a mammoth left under their farm during the last ice age.
The Flom family dairy farm was typical for Northern Wisconsin in 1969. It was located near the current day Ice Age Trail that runs through Wisconsin and was responsible for the hills, forests, lakes and swamps that make up this part of the country. To the south of this line is some of the best farm land in the country thanks to the glaciers and to the north the wooded expanse that most people thing about when they hear of Northern Wisconsin. The Flom farm is on this dividing line.
The father is trying to turn the farm over to the next generation, Daniel was trying to make it through college for Natural Resources and in the middle was what to do with the mammoth they uncovered in their gravel pit off the back forty



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