Free historical fiction Kindle books for 16 Dec 17

Warrior of the Highland

by Cassandra Michaels

** Steamy Highlander Romance that leaves little to the imagination – for mature audiences only! Contains 18 FREE Bonus Stories!!**

Abi’s father is the leader of their clan, and one day she will take over from him….That is, if the clan survives the impending battle, which will determine once and for all who gets to rule the great Scottish Highlands.

However, Abi and her father know that they have no chance of winning without uniting with another clan. When her father decides to marry her off to make it happen quicker, she has something to say.

Abi doesn’t believe that her clan’s freedom should be born from her enslavement and she’s not willing to accept that it’s the only option.

When an elderly woman comes to her one night with a legend about a broken warrior who can bring any clan to victory she sets out on a quest to find him. Can she prove that she can be the leader she is destined to be, or will she end up marrying a man she doesn’t love for the sake of her people?



Antony and Cleopatra

by William Shakespeare

Antony and Cleopatra is a tragedy by William Shakespeare. 

The plot is based on Thomas North’s translation of Plutarch’s Lives and follows the relationship between Cleopatra and Mark Antony from the time of the Sicilian revolt to Cleopatra’s suicide during the Final War of the Roman Republic. The major antagonist is Octavius Caesar, one of Antony’s fellow triumvirs of the Second Triumvirate and the first emperor of the Roman Empire. The tragedy is mainly set in Rome and Egypt, and is characterized by swift shifts in geographical location and linguistic register as it alternates between sensual, imaginative Alexandria and a more pragmatic, austere Rome.

Many consider Shakespeare’s Cleopatra, whom Antony describes as having “infinite variety,” as one of the most complex and fully developed female characters in the playwright’s body of work. She is frequently vain and histrionic enough to provoke an audience almost to scorn; at the same time, Shakespeare invests her and Antony with tragic grandeur. These contradictory features have led to famously divided critical responses. It is difficult to classify Antony and Cleopatra as belonging to a single genre. It can be described as a history play (though it does not completely adhere to historical accounts), as a tragedy (though not completely in Aristotelian terms), as a comedy, as a romance, and according to some critics, e.g. McCarter, a problem play. All one can say with certainty is that it is a Roman play, even a sequel to another of Shakespeare’s tragedies, Julius Caesar.



A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

by James Joyce

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is the first novel of Irish writer James Joyce.

A Künstlerroman in a modernist style, it traces the religious and intellectual awakening of young Stephen Dedalus, a fictional alter ego of Joyce and an allusion to Daedalus, the consummate craftsman of Greek mythology. Stephen questions and rebels against the Catholic and Irish conventions under which he has grown, culminating in his self-exile from Ireland to Europe. The work uses techniques that Joyce developed more fully in Ulysses (1922) and Finnegans Wake (1939).

A Portrait began life in 1903 as Stephen Hero–a projected 63-chapter autobiographical novel in a realistic style. After 25 chapters, Joyce abandoned Stephen Hero in 1907 and set to reworking its themes and protagonist into a condensed five-chapter novel, dispensing with strict realism and making extensive use of free indirect speech that allows the reader to peer into Stephen’s developing consciousness. American modernist poet Ezra Pound had the novel serialised in the English literary magazine The Egoist in 1914 and 1915, and published as a book in 1916 by B. W. Huebsch of New York. The publication of A Portrait and the short story collection Dubliners (1914) earned Joyce a place at the forefront of literary modernism.

In 1998, the Modern Library named the novel third on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.



A Changed Man

by Thomas Hardy

A Changed Man and Other Tales is a collection of twelve tales written by Thomas Hardy. The collection was originally published in book form in 1913, although all of the tales had been previously published in newspapers or magazines from 1881 to 1900.

There are eleven short stories and a novella The Romantic Adventures of a Milkmaid. At the end of the book there is a map of the imaginary Wessex of Hardy’s novels and poems. Six of the stories were published before 1891 and therefore lacked international copyright protection when the collection began to be sold in October 1913.

Alicia’s Diary is a short story written by Victorian novelist Thomas Hardy in 1887. It is the diary of a girl named Alicia that is a tragic romance. The story was reprinted in the 1913 collection A Changed Man and Other Tales.

A Mere Interlude is a short story by Thomas Hardy. It was first published in The Bolton Weekly Journal in October 1885. The story was reprinted in the collection A Changed Man and Other Tales (1913).



Ben-Hur

by Lew Wallace

Ben-Hur is a novel by Lew Wallace, and considered “the most influential Christian book of the nineteenth century”. It became a best-selling American novel, surpassing Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) in sales. The book also inspired other novels with biblical settings and was adapted for the stage and motion picture productions. Ben-Hur remained at the top of the US all-time bestseller list until the publication of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind (1936). The 1959 MGM film adaptation of Ben-Hur was seen by tens of millions and won eleven Academy Awards in 1960, after which the book’s sales increased and it surpassed Gone with the Wind. It was blessed by Pope Leo XIII, the first novel ever to receive such praise. The success of the novel and its stage and film adaptations also helped it to become a popular cultural icon that was used to promote numerous commercial products.

The story recounts in descriptive detail the adventures of Judah Ben-Hur, a Jewish prince from Jerusalem who is enslaved by the Romans at the beginning of the 1st century and becomes a charioteer and a Christian. Running in parallel with Judah’s narrative is the unfolding story of Jesus, from the same region and around the same age. The novel reflects themes of betrayal, conviction, and redemption, with a revenge plot that leads to a story of love and compassion.

Ben-Hur is a story of a fictional hero named Judah Ben-Hur, a Jewish nobleman who was falsely accused of an attempted assassination and enslaved by the Romans. He becomes a successful charioteer. The story’s revenge plot becomes a story of compassion and forgiveness.



O’er the Land of the Free (Ohio River Valley Series Book 1)

by Beca Sue

At the young age of 13, Virginia Hensley is told the family secret. For nearly five years the farm she loves and feels safe at has been a stop on the Underground Railroad. Virginia’s parents request that she help in the dangerous and illegal activity of transporting and hiding runaway slaves. Unforeseen situations arise, forcing the Hensley family to take risks that put the entire family in danger.
In the fall of 1860, Abraham Lincoln is elected President. Soon after taking office in March of 1861, a battle is fought at Fort Sumter in South Carolina. The dividing line is drawn, as eleven southern states secede from the Union, and the South becomes the Confederacy. The Underground Railroad comes to a halt, but Reuben, the oldest Hensley son, answers the call to go fight for the Union forces. A heartbreaking four year war follows as fellow countrymen take up arms against one another, resulting in mass casualties and destruction.



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