Free literary fiction Kindle books for 17 Dec 17

Every Night: Romantic Suspense (The Brush of Love Series Book 1)

by Lexy Timms

USA Today Bestselling Author, Lexy Timms, delivers a beautiful tale about a young man who finds love in the least expected place.

I loved this man with every fiber of my being and with every atom that vibrated to bring my body to life.

Bryan McBride is a disappointment to his parents. Doesn’t matter he’s a successful architect and that in his spare time he builds homes for the homeless. His tattoos disrespect his family name, his business partner is too blue collar, too surfer, and Bryan’s brotherâ??who the family never talks aboutâ??died from a drug overdose.

Bryan’s passion for art is rekindled when Hailey Ryan comes into town to open a gallery. Without funds to pay for the construction of the gallery, Bryan offers to work in exchange for some of her artwork.

He’s caught off guard by the strong attraction he has to her. It’s the perfect distraction from the issues in his life he wants to avoid. Except secrets have a way of revealing themselves.

As they begin a passionate love affair, a secret Hailey is keeping threatens to ruin their relationship and possibly their lives.

Fans of Nicholas Sparks will love this sweet-with-heat love story EVERY TIME.

The Brush of Love Series:
Every Night
Every Day
Every Time



Anne of the Island

by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Anne of the Island is the third book in the Anne of Green Gables series, written by Lucy Maud Montgomery about Anne Shirley.

In the continuing story of Anne Shirley, Anne attends Redmond College in Kingsport, where she is studying for her BA.

Anne leaves Green Gables and her work as a teacher in Avonlea to pursue her original dream (which she gave up in Anne of Green Gables) of taking further education at Redmond College in Nova Scotia. Gilbert Blythe and Charlie Sloane enroll as well, as does Anne’s friend from Queen’s Academy, Priscilla Grant. During her first week of school, Anne befriends Philippa Gordon, a beautiful girl whose frivolous ways charm her. Philippa (Phil for short) also happens to be from Anne’s birthplace in Bolingbroke, Nova Scotia.

The girls spend their first year in boardinghouses and decide to set up house thereafter in a lovely cottage called Patty’s Place, near campus. The girls enter their second year at Redmond happily ensconced at Patty’s Place, along with Queen’s classmate Stella Maynard and her “Aunt Jimsie” (their chaperone), while life continues in Avonlea. Diana Barry becomes engaged to Fred Wright and Davy and Dora continue to keep Marilla busy.

Midway through their college years, Gilbert Blythe, who has always loved Anne, proposes to her but Anne rejects him; although she and Gilbert are very close, she holds sentimental fantasies about true love (all featuring a tall, dark, handsome, inscrutable hero) and does not recognize her true feelings for Gilbert. Gilbert leaves, his heart broken, and the two drift apart.



Collected Works: Volume I

by Edgar Allan Poe

Collected Works of American author Edgar Allan Poe include many poems, short stories, and one novel. His fiction spans multiple genres, including horror fiction, adventure, science fiction, and detective fiction, a genre he is credited with inventing.

These works are generally considered part of the Dark romanticism movement, a literary reaction to Transcendentalism. Poe’s writing reflects his literary theories: he disagreed with didacticism and allegory. Meaning in literature, he said in his criticism, should be an undercurrent just beneath the surface; works whose meanings are too obvious cease to be art. Poe pursued originality in his works, and disliked proverbs. He often included elements of popular pseudosciences such as phrenology and physiognomy. His most recurring themes deal with questions of death, including its physical signs, the effects of decomposition, concerns of premature burial, the reanimation of the dead, and mourning. Though known as a masterly practitioner of Gothic fiction, Poe did not invent the genre; he was following a long-standing popular tradition.

Poe’s literary career began in 1827 with the release of 50 copies of Tamerlane and Other Poems credited only to “a Bostonian”, a collection of early poems that received virtually no attention. In December 1829, Poe released Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane, and Minor Poems in Baltimore before delving into short stories for the first time with “Metzengerstein” in 1832. His most successful and most widely read prose during his lifetime was “The Gold-Bug”, which earned him a $100 prize, the most money he received for a single work. One of his most important works, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”, was published in 1841 and is today considered the first modern detective story. Poe called it a “tale of ratiocination”. Poe became a household name with the publication of “The Raven” in 1845, though it was not a financial success. The publishing industry at the time was a difficult career choice and much of Poe’s work was written using themes specifically catered for mass market tastes.



Book of Snobs

by William Makepeace Thackeray

Book of Snobs is a collection of satirical works by William Makepeace Thackeray first published in the magazine Punch as The Snobs of England, By One of Themselves. Published in 1848, the book was serialised in 1846/47 around the same time as Vanity Fair.

While the word ‘snob’ had been in use since the end of the 18th century Thackeray’s adoption of the term to refer to people who look down on others who are “socially inferior” quickly gained popularity.



At the Earth’s Core

by Edgar Rice Burroughs

At the Earth’s Core is a fantasy novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the first in his series about the fictional “hollow earth” land of Pellucidar. It first appeared as a four-part serial in All-Story Weekly from April 4-25, 1914. 

The author relates how, traveling in the Sahara desert, he has encountered a remarkable vehicle and its pilot, David Innes, a man with a remarkable story to tell.

David Innes is a mining heir who finances the experimental “iron mole,” an excavating vehicle designed by his elderly inventor friend Abner Perry. In a test run, they discover the vehicle cannot be turned, and it burrows 500 miles into the Earth’s crust, emerging into the unknown interior world of Pellucidar. In Burroughs’ concept, the Earth is a hollow shell with Pellucidar as the internal surface of that shell.

Pellucidar is inhabited by prehistoric creatures of all geological eras, and dominated by the Mahars, a species of flying reptile both intelligent and civilized, but which enslaves and preys on the local stone-age humans. Innes and Perry are captured by the Mahars’ ape-like Sagoth servants and taken with other human captives to the chief Mahar city of Phutra. Among their fellow captives are the brave Ghak, the Hairy One, from the country of Sari, the shifty Hooja the Sly One and the lovely Dian the Beautiful of Amoz.

David Innes, attracted to Dian the Beautiful, defends her against the unwanted attentions of Hooja the Sly One, but due to his ignorance of local customs she assumes he wants her as a slave, not a friend or lover, and subsequently snubs him. Only later, after Hooja slips their captors in a dark tunnel and forces Dian to leave with him, does David learn from Ghak the cause of the misunderstanding.



At the Mountains of Madness

by H.P. Lovecraft

At the Mountains of Madness is a novella by horror writer H. P. Lovecraft.

The story details the events of a disastrous expedition to the Antarctic continent in September 1930, and what was found there by a group of explorers led by the narrator, Dr. William Dyer of Miskatonic University. Throughout the story, Dyer details a series of previously untold events in the hope of deterring another group of explorers who wish to return to the continent.

The novella’s title is derived from a line in “The Hashish Man,” a short story by fantasy writer Edward Plunkett, Lord Dunsany: “And we came at last to those ivory hills that are named the Mountains of Madness…”

The story has inadvertently popularized the concept of ancient astronauts, as well as Antarctica’s place in the “ancient astronaut mythology”.

The story is told in a first-person perspective by the geologist William Dyer, a professor at Miskatonic University, in the hope to prevent an important and much publicized scientific expedition to Antarctica. Throughout the course of his explanation, Dyer relates how he led a group of scholars from Arkham’s Miskatonic University on a previous expedition to Antarctica, during which they discovered ancient ruins and a dangerous secret, beyond a range of mountains higher than the Himalayas.



Before Adam

by Jack London

Before Adam is a historical novel by Jack London. It is the story of a man who dreams he lives the life of an early hominid Australopithecine.

The story offers an early view of human evolution. The majority of the story is told through the eyes of the man’s hominid alter ego, one of the Cave People. In addition to the Cave People, there are the more advanced Fire People, and the more animal-like Tree People.

Other characters include the hominid’s father, a love interest, and Red-Eye, a fierce “atavism” that perpetually terrorizes the Cave People. A sabre-cat also plays a role in the story.



Anthem

by Ayn Rand

Anthem is a dystopian fiction novella by Ayn Rand.

It takes place at some unspecified future date when mankind has entered another dark age. Technological advancement is now carefully planned and the concept of individuality has been eliminated.

Equality 7-2521, writing by candlelight in a tunnel under the earth, tells the story of his life up to that point. He exclusively uses plural pronoun(s) (“we”, “our”, “they”) to refer to himself and others. He was raised like all children in his society, away from his parents in collective homes. Later, he realized that he was born with a “curse”, that makes him learn quickly and ask many questions. He excelled at the Science of Things and dreamed of becoming a Scholar. However, a Council of Vocations assigns all people to their Life Mandate, and he was assigned to be a Street Sweeper.

Equality 7-2521 accepts his street sweeping assignment as penance for his “Transgression of Preference” in secretly desiring to be a Scholar. He works with Union 5-3992 and International 4-8818, who is Equality’s only friend (which is another Transgression of Preference). He found an entrance to a tunnel in their assigned work area. Despite International’s protests that any exploration unauthorized by a Council is forbidden, Equality entered the tunnel and found that it contains metal tracks. Equality realized that the tunnel is from the Unmentionable Times of the distant past. He began sneaking away from his community to use the tunnel as a laboratory for scientific experiments. He stole paper and is using it to write his journal. He is now 21 years old.



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