Free war Kindle books for 01 Feb 18

nelyazuyasvu

by Pakret Poloeva

nelyazuyasvu



peobdeimon

by Chil Karnevski

peobdeimon



THE DECEIT: Love in War

by Hardeep Singh Ghuman

“Over time letters from Galina reduced in numbers. Maxim pondered over the fact and came to the conclusion that it was his severe injury that has discouraged Galina from keeping the relationship going. Who would want to spend the rest of her life with someone who was grievously wounded and disfigured for life? Physical pain and mental agony, coupled with isolation and uncertainty took the better of him and he fell into a mental chasm. In his weak moments, he began finding solace in Veronika’s company. After her duty hours, Veronika would come back to the ward to spend time with the man she had started to like. They shared many things in common – their choice of principles in life, of music, of food, of idea of love, of relationship – almost everything matched. They would sit together in the lawns outside for hours in the early morning or late evening and share their thoughts. Veronika hailed from the Upper Volga Region, a region thousands of miles from Maxim’s. Their culture was different but that hardly mattered, for Maxim and Veronika felt they had most things in common. Galina was out of sight, Veronika was before his eyes every day. He did love Galina but did not want to force his decision upon her. If she felt that Maxim was no more the right choice for her, so be it. Or was it just an excuse for him to continue his bonding with Veronika? Maxim was a sensitive man and like all real men he cried, too. He would find time and place to cry – in the lawn outside when he was alone or in his bed at night, although he never wanted other people to see his frailty. He might have been infirm but he was not frail. Most of us refuse to see the real us. The real us are frail and seek refuge in good things of life, cowering behind a thick veil of excuses. We often fall from grace, we often fail to see the brighter side of life, and we often fail to see the good things coming our way. Most of us are too busy going the easy way forward rather than bracing up for challenges that our life throws at us. Maxim was no exception. He cowered and his mind crippled more than his body and in one of the weakest moments professed his love for Veronika one evening. Veronika simply looked into his deep eyes, kissed his hand and tears welled into her emerald eyes. Maxim seemed to have resigned to his fate and Veronika was more than welcoming.”

“The Gorilla had the reputation of being the ultimate nationalist and the most brutal man in service in the Soviet Army. He had an underprivileged childhood, much like Saddam Hussein of Iraq. Like Saddam, he was nobody’s child; he was born out of wedlock, his mother and all her relatives abandoned him, no one knew who his father was, and the child was literally thrown for dead. Born and thrown in Novobirsk, this slender body was picked up by a destitute, cared for by another woman after his protector died of hunger, brought up by yet another man, a priest, after the woman was stabbed by a mugger, and ultimately cared for by some God fearing man after the priest was jailed for a murder, the Gorilla was the courage personified. A huge man with strong, muscular body, he particularly enjoyed torturing those who ever gave a hint of being anti Soviet. Better part of his life had been spent in torture chambers where he would devise amazingly unique methods to inflict pain on his victims. While in the custody of the priest, he was brought up in the most loving and peaceful ways imaginable but it was his brain, his heart and his vision that all combined to turn him into an axis of evil. He chose not to marry and he chose to annihilate enemies of the State. He was a curious mix of bland and enigma. He was General Gorilla. Abominable, but highly efficient.”

A sensitive love story rolling from Kamchatka Peninsula to Afghanistan, and back.



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