Free horror Kindle books for 18 Sep 18

Legend of the Ghost’s Woods: Shadows of the Night Volume Zero

by Michael C. Laney

The Ghost’s Woods, a vast expanse of untamed forest and swampland straddling the borders of Poe and Bennick Counties. The woods were known for being the Evil Place long before the first explorers came from Europe. Deep in the forest strange voices sometimes whispered dark secrets to those who could hear them, and a creature nearly as old as mankind roamed among the trees, watching, and occasionally claiming a victim of its own choosing.

With the tragedy that followed the founding of the small city of Ariana, Florida, the woods received their name. They had long been forgotten as being the Evil Place, but the passage of time only proved they were a haunted place, the home of something cunning and malevolent that was waiting to strike!

Here is the history of how the Ghost’s Woods became a legend. The short story prologue to Michael C. Laney’s forthcoming Shadows Of The Night Series!



Palindrome: The Prequel to Six Dead Men (The Robert Deed Series Book 1)

by Rae Stoltenkamp

The prequel novella to SIX DEAD MEN

Haddington, near Edinburgh – it’s 1975. Here change is a process slowed by tradition and the luxury of a certain distance from the swift progress of the rest of the world. Robert Deed’s 13th birthday approaches. On the cusp of adulthood, this teenager looks beyond a thing and sees inside it. It’s a trait shared with his all-seeing mother. No-one knows Robert’s strangeness better than his mother Rowena Deed. In her dreams she sees his future but knows she will not be there to see her son mature. Pushing aside her sorrow at this knowledge, she instead focuses on giving him the tools he’ll need to be a man of worth.

But this birthday brings more than a coming of age celebration for Robert. He’s about to see the glint of Death’s scythe in the corner of his eye, even touch the honed edge. Travelling the road towards his future, Robert must solve the murder of his first crush, battle his grief, and exonerate a dear friend. Is he willing and able? Can he truly trust in the so called inner wisdom of his instinct? More importantly, will his world let him?



Night Terror

by Brent Casey

Eight-year-old Kacey Matthews slept quietly in her bed. Everything seemed fine until the worse case of night terrors hit…



The Disinterment

by H.P. Lovecraft

Fist published in 1935, “The Disinterment” is a short horror story by H.P. Lovecraft.



Ex Oblivione

by H.P. Lovecraft

“Ex Oblivione” is a prose poem by American horror fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft, written in late 1920 or early 1921 and first published in The United Amateur in March 1921, under the pseudonym Ward Phillips.
It is written in first person and tells of the dreams of a presumably dying man. In his dreams, the man is walking through a valley and encounters a vine-covered wall with a locked bronze gate therein. He longs to know what lies beyond the gate.



The Thing on the Doorstep

by H.P. Lovecraft

“The Thing on the Doorstep” is a short story written by H.P. Lovecraft, part of the Cthulhu Mythos universe of horror fiction. It was written in August 1933, and first published in the January 1937 issue of Weird Tales.
Daniel Upton, the story’s narrator, begins by telling that he has killed his best friend, Edward Derby, and that he hopes his account will prove that he is not a murderer …



The Horror at Martin’s Beach

by H.P. Lovecraft

Sailors kill a 50-foot creature at sea after a lengthy battle. The creature bears strange anatomical irregularities such as a single large eye and rudimentary forelegs and six-toed feet in place of pectoral fins. After inspection by marine biologists, it is revealed to be just a juvenile. The captain who captured the creature tours the coast and profits from the corpse of the deceased creature. As the captain attempts to finish his business at Martin’s Beach, a group of swimmers are attacked. The captain and others attempt to rescue the victims but it is too late. The rescuers and the captain are hypnotized and pulled into the water by the creature’s apparently vengeful mother, to the horror of an onlooking crowd.



Supernatural Horror in Literature

by H.P. Lovecraft

Great modern American supernaturalist brilliantly surveys history of genre to 1930s, summarizing, evaluating scores of books, including works by Poe, Bierce, M.R. James, “Monk” Lewis, many others. Praised by critics as diverse as Edmund Wilson and Vincent Starrett.



The Devil in the Belfry

by Edgar Allan Poe

In an isolated town called Vondervotteimittis (wonder-what-time-it-is), the punctilious inhabitants seem to be concerned with nothing but clocks and cabbage. This methodical, boring and quiet little borough is devastated by the arrival of a devilish figure playing a big fiddle who comes straight down from a hill, goes into the belltower, brutally attacks the belfry-man and rings thirteen o’clock, to the horror of the town’s inhabitants.



The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar

by Edgar Allan Poe

“The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” is a short story by American author Edgar Allan Poe about a mesmerist who puts a man in a suspended hypnotic state at the moment of death. An example of a tale of suspense and horror, it is also, to a certain degree, a hoax, as it was published without claiming to be fictional, and many at the time of publication (1845) took it to be a factual account. Poe toyed with this for a while before admitting it was a work of pure fiction in his marginalia.
The narrator presents the facts of the extraordinary case of his friend Ernest Valdemar, which have incited public discussion. He is interested in mesmerism, a pseudoscience involving bringing a patient into a hypnagogic state by the influence of magnetism, a process that later developed into hypnotism. He points out that, as far as he knows, no one has ever been mesmerized at the point of death, and he is curious to see what effects mesmerism would have on a dying person. He considers experimenting on Valdemar, an author whom he had previously mesmerized, and who has recently been diagnosed with phthisis (tuberculosis).



The Lair of the White Worm

by Bram Stoker

In a tale of ancient evil, Bram Stoker creates a world of lurking horrors and bizarre denizens: a demented mesmerist, hellbent on mentally crushing the girl he loves; a gigantic kite raised to rid the land of an unnatural infestation of birds, and which receives strange commands along its string; and all the while, the great white worm slithers below, seeking its next victim…
Bram Stoker, creator of Dracula, is one of the most enduring and masterful influences on the literature of terror.



Memory

by H.P. Lovecraft

“Memory” is a flash fiction short story by American horror and science fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft, written in 1919 and published in May 1923 in The National Amateur.
This story takes place in the ancient valley of Nis, in vegetation-covered stone ruins described by Lovecraft in great detail. These crumbling blocks of monolithic stone now serve only for grey toads and snakes to nest under. Interspersed in the ruins are large trees that are home to little apes. Through the bottom of this valley runs the great, slimy red river called Than.



At the Mountains of Madness

by H.P. Lovecraft

At the Mountains of Madness is a novella by horror writer H. P. Lovecraft, written in February/March 1931 and originally serialized in the February, March and April 1936 issues of Astounding Stories. It has been reproduced in numerous collections since Lovecraft’s death.

Lovecraft scholar S. T. Joshi describes the novella as representing the decisive “demythology” of the Cthulhu Mythos by reinterpreting Lovecraft’s earlier supernatural stories in a science fiction paradigm.



The Nameless City

by H.P. Lovecraft

“The Nameless City” is a horror story written by H. P. Lovecraft in January 1921 and first published in the November 1921 issue of the amateur press journal The Wolverine. It is often considered the first Cthulhu Mythos story.
The Nameless City of the story’s title is an ancient ruin located somewhere in the deserts of the Arabian Peninsula and is older than any human civilization



The Dunwich Horror

by H.P. Lovecraft

In H.P. Lovecraft’s, “The Dunwich Horror”, we are told the story of Wilbur Whateley, the son of a deformed albino mother and an unknown father (alluded to in passing by the mad Old Whateley as “Yog-Sothoth”), and the strange events surrounding his birth and precocious development. Wilbur matures at an abnormal rate, reaching manhood within a decade. All the while, his sorcerer grandfather indoctrinates him into certain dark rituals and the study of witchcraft.



The Clown Picture

by Troy McCombs

Some clowns just have an appetite for children.

Following in the tradition of Stephen King’s It…

“Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls! Come see the flying trapeze twins, the lion and lion tamer, the clown and his appetite for children! Do be scared, as it helps in the digestion process!”

Nine-year-old Logan Barnes, a sweet, precocious boy who adores the circus, receives an old, worn painted picture of a clown from his mom one fateful day. Almost at once, Logan begins to feel haunted by the portrait he so desperately wants to admire. The clown in the painting, he learns, is somewhat alive, and feeds off the innocence of a child–Logan–as fuel to break through his painted prison so that he can anchor himself into the real world. Logan must face him, his worst fear come true, not only in order to save himself, but also his loved ones as well…



Poetry of the Gods

by H.P. Lovecraft

Poetry and the Gods is a short story by horror writer and poet H.P. Lovecraft in collaboration with writer Anna Helen Crofts. The story is very different from the vast majority of Lovecraft’s other work and collaborations. It does, however, bear similar themes regarding dreams as a doorway to magic realms, and slumbering gods.
The narrative follows the dream-voyage of Marcia, a young woman filled with weariness of the mundane world and all its woes. She resolves to ease her troubled soul by reading a magazine of poetry. As she does, a dream-state unfolds in which the Greek god Hermes appears and bears Marcia to the court of Zeus and the Olympians.



The Road

by Jack London

The Road is an autobiographical memoir by Jack London, first published in 1907. It is London’s account of his experiences as a hobo in the 1890s, during the worst economic depression the United States had experienced up to that time.[1] He describes his experiences hopping freight trains, “holding down” a train when the crew is trying to throw him off, begging for food and money, and making up extraordinary stories to fool the police. He also tells of the thirty days that he spent in the Erie County Penitentiary, which he described as a place of “unprintable horrors,” after being “pinched” (arrested) for vagrancy. In addition, he recounts his time with Kelly’s Army, which he joined up with in Wyoming and remained with until its dissolution at the Mississippi River.



Berenice

by Edgar Allan Poe

“Berenice” is a horror short story by Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849). First published in 1835, the tale is centered on the death of a young girl, named Berenice, and the mysterious visions of her cousin, Egaeusâ?¦



The Complete Fiction

by H.P. Lovecraft

The Nameless City
The Festival
The Colour Out of Space
The Call of Cthulhu
The Dunwich Horror
The Whisperer in Darkness
The Dreams in the Witch House
The Haunter of the Dark
The Shadow Over Innsmouth
Discarded Draft of “The Shadow Over Innsmouth”
The Shadow Out of Time
At the Mountains of Madness
The Case of Charles Dexter Ward
Azathoth
Beyond the Wall of Sleep
Celephaïs
Cool Air
Dagon
Ex Oblivione
Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family
From Beyond
He
Herbert West-Reanimator
Hypnos
In the Vault
Memory
Nyarlathotep
Pickman’s Model
The Book
The Cats of Ulthar
The Descendant
The Doom That Came to Sarnath
The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath
The Evil Clergyman
The Horror at Red Hook
The Hound
The Lurking Fear
The Moon-Bog
The Music of Erich Zann
The Other Gods
The Outsider
The Picture in the House
The Quest of Iranon
The Rats in the Walls
The Shunned House
The Silver Key
The Statement of Randolph Carter
The Strange High House in the Mist
The Street
The Temple
The Terrible Old Man
The Thing on the Doorstep
The Tomb
The Transition of Juan Romero
The Tree
The Unnamable
The White Ship
What the Moon Brings
Polaris
The Very Old Folk
Ibid
Old Bugs
Sweet Ermengarde, or, The Heart of a Country Girl
A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson
The History of the Necronomicon



The Pit and the Pendulum

by Edgar Allan Poe

The Pit and the Pendulum” is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe and first published in 1842. The story is about the torments endured by a prisoner of the Spanish Inquisition, though Poe skews historical facts. The narrator of the story is deemed guilty for an unnamed crime and put into a completely dark room. He passes out while trying to determine the size of the room. When he wakes up, he realizes there is a large, deep pit in the middle of the room. He loses consciousness again and awakens strapped on his back, unable to move more than his head. He soon realizes there is a large blade-like pendulum hanging above him, slowly getting closer to cutting through his chest. He finds a way to escape but the walls of his prison start to move and close in on him, pushing him closer and closer to falling into the pit.

The story is especially effective at inspiring fear in the reader because of its heavy focus on the senses, such as sound, emphasizing its reality, unlike many of Poe’s stories which are aided by the supernatural. The traditional elements established in popular horror tales at the time are followed but critical reception has been mixed.



He

by H.P. Lovecraft

“He” is a short story by American horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. Written August 1925, it was first published in Weird Tales, September 1926.[1]



Chosen: Episode One (The Demon Gate Series Book 1)

by Nicholas Bella

“One minute, everything was normal for me, and the next, all hell breaks loose. “
I’m a cop with the Alandale City police force. I love my job, protecting the public and getting rid of scum was what made my day. Everything was going just fine until my lunch was interrupted by some rich, arrogant jerk in an Aston Martin who thought he could just speed past my squad car and get away with it. I had no idea what I was getting myself into when I wrote Mr. Ledéo his speeding ticket, but after what happened to me, I wish I had just let him go. Maybe then, my world wouldn’t have been turned upside down and inside out.

Warning: This serial contains strong adult content not meant for sensitive eyes. The novelettes in this serial will be filled with dark, twisted, raunchy and steamy scenes between powerful, sexy men that will either offend you or get ya revved up. This series will not be pulling any punches, and it won’t apologize for hurting your feelings, either. You’ll find no fluff and ruffles here. These demons play hard and they fight dirty. There are approximately 25100 words in this novelette.



The Outsider

by H.P. Lovecraft

“The Outsider” is a short story by American horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. Written between March and August 1921, it was first published in Weird Tales, April 1926. In this work, a mysterious man who has been living alone in a castle for as long as he can remember decides to break free in search of human contact and light. “The Outsider” is one of Lovecraft’s most commonly reprinted works and is also one of the most popular stories ever to be published in Weird Tales.
“The Outsider” combines Horror, Fantasy, and Gothic Fiction to create a nightmarish story, containing themes of loneliness, the abhuman, and the afterlife. Source: Wikipedia



The Evil Clergyman

by H.P. Lovecraft

“The Evil Clergyman” is an excerpt from a letter written by American horror fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft in 1933. After his death, it was published in the April 1939 issue of Weird Tales as a short story. The story was later adapted into the unreleased 1987 anthology film Pulse Pounders.
The story begins in the attic of an ancient house. The narrator’s companion refers to the former owner of the house and the presumably violent end that befell him. He advises the narrator not to stay after dark or touch anything, especially the small object on a table, which the companion seems to fear considerably.



In the Dark

by Edith Nesbit

nice, moody, horror story. Two best friends are bedevilled by a third friend, who haunts them from grade school to adulthood. He seems to intuit things he can’t know, and always tells the truth. One friend escapes to India to get away, the other stays in England. When the escapee returns, he finds his friend shattered and half-mad. Why, is the story.



Morella

by Edgar Allan Poe

“Morella” is a short story in the Gothic horror genre by 19th-century American author and critic Edgar Allan Poe.
An unnamed narrator marries Morella, a woman with great scholarly knowledge who delves into studies of the German philosophers Fichte and Schelling, dealing with the question of identity. Morella spends her time in bed reading and teaching her husband. Realizing her physical deterioration, her husband, the narrator, becomes frightened and wishes for his wife’s death and eternal peace. Eventually, Morella dies in childbirth proclaiming: “I am dying. But within me is a pledge of that affection… which thou didst feel for me, Morella. And when my spirit departs shall the child live.”



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